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For when your thoughts are drifting to things not so movie, or if you're feeling trivially inclined.
591

Food... Let's talk about food.
Topic by: jross3
Posted: April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST
Last Reply: May 30, 2004 - 7:43 AM PDT

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author topic: Food... Let's talk about food.
jross3
post #1  on April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST  
I'm hungry. I'm always hungry.. and I eat against the rules, too. Lots of pasta - just about every lunch I eat is pasta, either Mac&Cheese or instant ramen (with chicken bites, yummy!). I don't get much exercise, but I still stay pretty close to a fair weight for my height.
Atkins can suck my noodles. Yet some of my friends won't eat bread anymore. Can you imagine? No bread! How can you make a sandwich without bread?
They even serve open-faced sandwiches (which is an oxymoron no mattter how you look at it) without bread now (they'll ask you if you want with or without bread). It's still called a sandwich, even though it has no bread, which would not have been "sandwiching" the meat even if it was there. Isn't there a better name for this dish?

Question: Are there any vegetarians in the audiance?
I've been told that after many years without meat, you become intolerant to it even to the point of sickness. Could there really be truth to this?

Here's a marinade for the meat lovers: 60% your favorite mild sauce (KC Masterpiece), 40% your fav. spicy (Red's Hot from Red's Backwoods BBQ). Add some onions (I used onion powder, seemed to work better), paprika, and a little salt. Soak some boneless chicken in it overnight then bake it, with the leftover sauce in the bottom of the pan. Just make sure to put it all in one pan, or that the suce is deep enough that it won't burn... (ours made lots of smoke but the chicken was fine)

How about the Quizzno's commercials? Those rats are freaky, but interesting. There's one on Cartoon Network based on the Space Ghost show that forces you to stare at the sub... I want to put you in my mouth, quizzno's sub!

Yummy! What's your favorite food?
hamano
post #2  on April 1, 2004 - 10:48 PM PST  
I'm warning you, don't get me started. I promised IronS!
hamano
post #3  on April 1, 2004 - 10:49 PM PST  
Actually, you know what? If we start a food thread on purpose, do you think it will turn into a film or anime thread after a few posts?
dh22
post #4  on April 2, 2004 - 9:42 AM PST  
I agree. I am a carb junky. I love bread. I love pasta. I love rice. I love Ramen noodles. They are the cheapest and best food you can get. I could live off them noodles and spend like 5 bucks a months. I don't use the whole packet. I use maybe a third. They put too much salt in it.
IronS
post #5  on April 2, 2004 - 10:01 AM PST  
> On April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Can you imagine? No bread! How can you make a sandwich without bread?
> ---------------------------------

A couple of nights ago, I had dinner at McNear's in Petaluma and they offer their burgers without bun and with veggies or salad. I was so thrilled. Before this whole Atkins diet rage, restaurants would charge me extra for the veggies (as a side).

I'm not always good. Just yesterday, I had some pecan brittle. My friend's mother made it so I had to have some (can't turn down homemade food). Speaking of homemade, where's your recipe for "sex cookies", The HAMster?
jross3
post #6  on April 2, 2004 - 10:06 AM PST  
> On April 1, 2004 - 10:49 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Actually, you know what? If we start a food thread on purpose, do you think it will turn into a film or anime thread after a few posts?
> ---------------------------------

That's what I'm hoping to find out. But there will be one or two posts connecting it to something... then it's back to food, no doubt.
jross3
post #7  on April 2, 2004 - 10:11 AM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 10:01 AM PST IronS wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST jross3 wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Can you imagine? No bread! How can you make a sandwich without bread?
> > ---------------------------------
>
> A couple of nights ago, I had dinner at McNear's in Petaluma and they offer their burgers without bun and with veggies or salad. I was so thrilled. Before this whole Atkins diet rage, restaurants would charge me extra for the veggies (as a side).
> ---------------------------------

Really? Does that mean extra veggies, or does it usually not include anything at all (a reastaraunt burger without lettuce and pickles? I've never heard of such a crime!).
But I'd say "some peanut brittle" doesn't count as being bad, unless you ate it as a small meal (but I wouldn't blame you, my granny makes good peanut brittle too).
IronS
post #8  on April 2, 2004 - 10:51 AM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 10:11 AM PST jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Really? Does that mean extra veggies, or does it usually not include anything at all (a reastaraunt burger without lettuce and pickles?

There were still lettuce, tomtaoes and a pickle. Usually, burgers come with fries, but this one didn't and had veggies or salad instead.

> But I'd say "some peanut brittle" doesn't count as being bad, unless you ate it as a small meal (but I wouldn't blame you, my granny makes good peanut brittle too).
> ---------------------------------

It's bad for me, allergy-wise. That's what I mean. And all that sugar isn't good for my skin either. But, boy, was it yummy! I offered to share but the other people in the office had more self-control.
hamano
post #9  on April 2, 2004 - 10:58 AM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 10:11 AM PST jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> But I'd say "some peanut brittle" doesn't count as being bad, unless you ate it as a small meal (but I wouldn't blame you, my granny makes good peanut brittle too).
> ---------------------------------

I believe she said "pecan brittle"... Hmmm... I'd dip half of that in melted dark chocolate and let it cool.... Mmmmm

Well, since she asked, here is the recipe for Sex Cookies. Our Hungarian-American friend in college got the recipe from his mom, who called it Ishler. It's actually quite good right after sex, if you have an opportunity to indulge in both.

Mix 1.5 cups flour, .5 cups ground hazlenuts, .75 cups unsalted butter, 1 tsp. vanilla extract, .5 teaspoon lemon juice, and .75 cups sugar. Form this dough into a cylinder about 2 inches wide and wrap in foil or plastic wrap. Throw this log into the freezer for a while. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Take the stiff log of dough out and use a sharp knife to cut cookie slices. About a quarter inch thick. Put the slices on a cookie sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Slide the cookies out on a cooling rack.

Melt a coupla squares of bittersweet chocolate, or your favorite dark chocolate bar. Take 2 cookies and spread some raspberry preserve on one, then use the other to make a sandwich. Spread melted chocolate on top of the sandwich cookie. Put a whole blanched almond in the middle of the chocolate. Let the thing cool in the fridge.

You should end up with a buncha sandwich cookies, raspberry preserve in the middle and chocolate on top. Hold the cookie between your thumb and forefinger, with the forefinger resting on the almond. This way you won't get melted choco on your finger. Eat the cookie's edges, then pop the middle with the almond in your mouth. Good with dark, continental style coffee. Try feeding one to your lover while you're... um.... embracing...
jross3
post #10  on April 2, 2004 - 11:04 AM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 10:51 AM PST IronS wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> It's bad for me, allergy-wise.
> ---------------------------------

oh, right. I guess I'm lucky; the only food I'm particularly fond of and allergic to is chocolate (all my allergies seem to be medical; lots of anti-biotics give me hives bad enough to make my throat swell and kill me). I don't get hives or anything, but I sneeze uncontrolably. I'm not sure why, but I've had to deal with it all my life; I could sneeze almost nonstop for five minutes after eating a chocolate bar. Not much compared to the tragedy you've suffered, though.
hamano
post #11  on April 2, 2004 - 11:07 AM PST  
Oh, I'm getting all sad again! I retract my recipe!
HOngchua
post #12  on April 2, 2004 - 11:29 AM PST  
> On April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> How can you make a sandwich without bread?

Actually, you're not supposed to eliminate carbs. You're supposed to reduce simple carbs and go for complex carbs. My spouse happens to be a food scientist and there is some logic to Atkins diets. My recommendation is that you substitute whole wheat breads.


> Here's a marinade for the meat lovers....

Good meat brings out its own flavors too with minimum amounts of marinade. A good meat is flap steak which has a light marbling of fat (thus the flavor). We'll usually just marinate this with olive oil, garlic powder (for convenience), salt and pepper, and papayne-based meat tenderizer (from papaya). When grilled on high heat, the result is a very tender and tasty slim slab of beef which can be served hot over a Caesar or Greek-style salad. It can be also used in tacos or quesadillas.

For summer, a nice condiment to your meats would be the papaya and mango salsa sold at Trader Joe's. This has a fresh, spicy and sweet taste that's excellent for the warmer weather.


> How about the Quizzno's commercials? ...

Quizzno's. Good value for fueling-up but I wasn't taken with the taste. I personally prefer a lot more "bite 'n spice" to my foods. Toasting the bread and melting the cheese is still definitely a plus.

I had a nice beef okonomiyaki up in Japantown last weekend at the restaurant next to Kinokuniya's stationery shop. The sauce made the difference. I saw the chef at Benihana's making one and our daughter's piano teacher says that the okonomiyaki at that restaurant isn't bad either. Still, I wish I could get a recommendation for some really GOOD okonomiyaki.
hamano
post #13  on April 2, 2004 - 11:40 AM PST  
Okonomiyaki - one of my specialties! I don't really have a recipe.... I just mix it the way mom showed me. For starch I use grated nagaimo in addition to flour, for a more tender, lighter texture.
HOngchua
post #14  on April 2, 2004 - 12:07 PM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 11:40 AM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Okonomiyaki - one of my specialties! ...
> ---------------------------------


So what's in yours? Beef, pork, seafood, ...? Do you have a homemade sauce or do you use packaged?

hamano
post #15  on April 2, 2004 - 12:21 PM PST  
It's like a Japanese pizza so ingredients can vary widely, but I usually put chunks of cooked shrimp in the batter, along with the shredded cabbage. I fry up some thin sliced pork cut into inch wide pieces, usually pork belly (what they make bacon with) but also less fatty cuts.

Batter: I put the shredded cabbage in a mixing bowl, mix it with the grated nagaimo, add salt and white pepper, a little vegetable oil, one or two eggs, and I add water and flour a bit by bit until a batter-like consistency is achieved.

You put the pork on a skillet and spread them in a round shape, then drop some batter on top. You can use thin sliced beef or ground chicken, too. When the batter looks cooked around the edges, you flip the whole thing over.

When it's done on both sides, I put on sauce, shaved bonito, aonori-ko (a seaweed powder), and chopped up pickled ginger. I also put dollops of kewpie mayonnaise on top (some people use mustard). The sauce is a mixture of ketchup, soy sauce, and worcestershire sauce, but I use Bulldog brand Tonkatsu sauce and it works fine.
HOngchua
post #16  on April 2, 2004 - 12:55 PM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 12:21 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> ... I usually put chunks of cooked shrimp in the batter, along with the shredded cabbage. I fry up some thin sliced pork cut into inch wide pieces, usually pork belly (what they make bacon with) but also less fatty cuts.
>

That sounds pretty good! The waitress recommended the seafood okonomiyaki but my wife was already getting tempura prawns so I decided on beef. The sauce could have been tonkatsu sauce with some extra mayonnaise but it also could have also been the chef's own concoction - it had a nice tangy flavor to it.

I'd like to have a go at it one of these days. I know that everyone's got their own version of okonomiyaki but have you got any suggestions for a good recipe book?
jross3
post #17  on April 2, 2004 - 1:20 PM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 11:29 AM PST HOngchua wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Good meat brings out its own flavors too with minimum amounts of marinade.
> ---------------------------------

Yay! I knew there was another person out there like me. I just love a good steak without any bbq sauce or marinade. Sometimes I get some A1 sauce (Bold and spicy, yeah!), but a good steak is a joy in itself.
'course, there's always a time for a marinade. There's a local butcher with a wonderful sauce; we always get one of his steaks for a special occasion. It took a lot of pressure to get him to start selling it, but he'll never give out the recepie. Stingy!
AFleming
post #18  on April 2, 2004 - 1:30 PM PST  
> On April 1, 2004 - 9:53 PM PST jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Question: Are there any vegetarians in the audiance?
> I've been told that after many years without meat, you become intolerant to it even to the point of sickness. Could there really be truth to this?
>
> Yummy! What's your favorite food?
> ---------------------------------

I was a vegetarian for 5 years and didn't have any problems scarfing the Checkers Champ with Cheese that broke my fast. (Checkers was on my walk home from class, heehee). I've heard that from other people though.

My favorite food is a toss-up between spagetti and jambalaya. Oh, so good.

I lived off ramen all through my undergrad. I can barely stomach the stuff now. I had a Filipino roomate that used to make ramen with egg white (like the way egg-drop soup is made only less soupy) and okra. It was actually really good though I've never been brave enough to try it myself.
hamano
post #19  on April 2, 2004 - 2:05 PM PST  
> On April 2, 2004 - 12:55 PM PST HOngchua wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I'd like to have a go at it one of these days. I know that everyone's got their own version of okonomiyaki but have you got any suggestions for a good recipe book?
> ---------------------------------

I don't know any Okonomiyaki Cookbooks per se.... This looks like a good basic recipe. I just replace some of the flour/water with grated nagaimo.

I think a great steak really needs no seasoning except a good sprinkle of salt. My favorite cut is rib-eye, or Delmonico steak. It's basically the same as prime-rib, just not roasted. If you can get a really properly AGED steak, go for it. It's brought to the point of almost spoiling, but not quite. No tenderizing necessary, and the flavor is at maximum. Just grill it or pan fry it with salt and a bit of pepper. Some people swear by French style seasoned or herbed butters with their steak, but I don't need my meat to be THAT rich.

One of the best steaks I've ever had... It was a thick slice of roast prime rib, bone-in, rare. They took this and grilled it for a minute per side over hot mesquite coals. Tender and beefy!

My favorite way to go Asian with a steak... no teriyaki for me! I sautee strips of steak with pieces of onion, cabbage and green pepper. I dip this in a sauce made with soy sauce, water, grated garlic and chopped scallion. Great with rice! Great cooked at the table on an electric or portable gas skillet!
DBooher
post #20  on April 2, 2004 - 3:07 PM PST  
Actually a new study has discovered that completely cutting carbs out of your diet causes you to become extremely moody (grumpy). Everything must be eaten in moderation. (However moderation and I don't get along) I love food. Love love love food but I cannot cook. My mother is the "over-cooking" type; u stay in her house long enuff and u will get fat. Luckily I'm blessed with a quick metabolism, which will fade...*sigh.* I do lots of yoga and running (in between my anime marathon watching) But I cannot part w/ my Goerge Forman lean mean grill; I wait until I'm hungry now! B4 I cook anything; can someone give me a simple (maybe quick) yet o'so delicious recipe for chicken or beef! I love pasta with cheese sauce too! Great now I'm hungry.
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