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For when your thoughts are drifting to things not so movie, or if you're feeling trivially inclined.
591

Reading more than subtitles?
Topic by: Tiger
Posted: May 18, 2006 - 1:26 PM PDT
Last Reply: May 31, 2006 - 10:06 PM PDT

page  1  2      prev | next
author topic: Reading more than subtitles?
Tiger
post #1  on May 18, 2006 - 1:26 PM PDT  
Cinema is wonderful, but books enhance my joie de vivre like nothing else - except my wife.


Recently read and enjoyed:

The Penultimate Peril [2005] Lemony Snicket

Red Planet [1949] Robert Heinlein

Adam Bede [1858] George Eliot

The Little Guide to Your Well-Read Life [2005] Steve Leveen

The Golden Compass [1995] Philip Pullman

Lamb [2002] Christopher Moore

Rats [2004] Robert Sullivan


I'm sure many GreenCinephiles are of a like mind...?
hamano
post #2  on May 18, 2006 - 1:42 PM PDT  
> I'm sure many GreenCinephiles are of a like mind...?

Yeah, Tiger, so much so we started a book thread just yesterday! Come join us THERE.
kohnfused1
post #3  on May 18, 2006 - 1:44 PM PDT  
Have you tried chiming in on this this thread?
kohnfused1
post #4  on May 18, 2006 - 1:45 PM PDT  
> On May 18, 2006 - 1:42 PM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > I'm sure many GreenCinephiles are of a like mind...?
>
> Yeah, Tiger, so much so we started a book thread just yesterday! Come join us THERE.
> ---------------------------------

Damn! Beaten again. Aaargh!

Well, at least Tiger knows where to go know.
hamano
post #5  on May 18, 2006 - 1:56 PM PDT  
Hah! Don't bother starting a thread about The DaVinci Code either...
Ursus
post #6  on May 18, 2006 - 5:53 PM PDT  
Ok.

Now I am convinced that Hammy and Kohn are two wacky neighbors who live next to each other and never sleep, in their constant, but wacky and lovable battles to "one-up" each other every week in convenient 24 min. episodes.

Also, "The Man" just picked me to a be a Nielson ratings bitch.

Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!! I shall control what stays and what goes on the Air. O what delicious power! I am postively drunk with the thought of it.
hamano
post #7  on May 18, 2006 - 6:07 PM PDT  
> On May 18, 2006 - 5:53 PM PDT Ursus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Now I am convinced that Hammy and Kohn are two wacky neighbors

You're close... Kohnnie and I are actually "room-mates"...

Saan po kayo nakatira, Ursus?

Tiger
post #8  on May 19, 2006 - 1:38 PM PDT  
> On May 18, 2006 - 1:42 PM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------

> Yeah, Tiger, so much so we started a book thread just yesterday! Come join us THERE.
> ---------------------------------

So, only one thread-subject per forum here...?
hamano
post #9  on May 19, 2006 - 1:53 PM PDT  
Well, you can make as many as you want (heaven knows I have, over the years) but usually if there are more than one thread on the same subject running simultaneously they're "consolidated" into the first or most active one to avoid confusion. Considering a few of your books/authors are already being discussed in the other thread, I thought it would make more sense to take them over there.

Nothing is stopping any of us from each starting our own one-page threads about books we like, but that seems to go against the meaning of "thread"... more like "frayed strands" I guess.

The usual pattern here is that multiple similarly themed threads get consolidated fairly quickly. If the main thread takes off, a little after reaching 11 or more pages in length, they either lose energy and are forgotten or they're reincarnated anew starting with page 1 (the way threads are managed here makes it awkward to navigate on longer threads). Sometimes the secondary threads for an identical topic take on a life of their own, usually for off-off-topic discussions such as the conversation we're having now.
Eoliano
post #10  on May 19, 2006 - 6:07 PM PDT  
On the non-fiction front am currently reading Phillip Lopate's excellent (often startling) collection of film essays, Totally, Tenderly, Tragically, and Donald Richie's candidly intimate Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Both highly recommend. Fiction-wise, just started reading Jonathan Letham's Motherless Brooklyn and am happy to report that thus far it's a hilarious, ripsnorting good read! ; ~ )

Oh, sorry, I already posted this elsewhere...
MollyGrue
post #11  on May 24, 2006 - 12:59 PM PDT  
Lamb was good, but anything by Christopher Moore is excellent. I particularly like The Stupidest Angel.

Recently I read Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach and now I'm reading As We Were by E.F. Benson about his family and childhood in the Victorian Era.
woozy
post #12  on May 24, 2006 - 10:27 PM PDT  
> On May 24, 2006 - 12:59 PM PDT MollyGrue wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Lamb was good, but anything by Christopher Moore is excellent. I particularly like The Stupidest Angel.
>
Even "Fluke"?

Have you read "A Dirty Job" yet? What'd you think?


(actually Fluke was really good-- even though it was my least favorite Chris Moore book. And I do like the whalie-boys!)
MollyGrue
post #13  on May 27, 2006 - 1:54 PM PDT  
> On May 24, 2006 - 10:27 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On May 24, 2006 - 12:59 PM PDT MollyGrue wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Lamb was good, but anything by Christopher Moore is excellent. I particularly like The Stupidest Angel.
> >
> Even "Fluke"?
>
> Have you read "A Dirty Job" yet? What'd you think?
>
>
> (actually Fluke was really good-- even though it was my least favorite Chris Moore book. And I do like the whalie-boys!)
> ---------------------------------


I haven't read A Dirty Job yet. Or Coyote Blue. I hope to, someday. :) I also have to admit that Fluke was one of his weakest...at least for me. However it is still somewhat better than Lanb.
woozy
post #14  on May 28, 2006 - 10:02 AM PDT  
> I haven't read A Dirty Job yet. Or Coyote Blue. I hope to, someday. :) I also have to admit that Fluke was one of his weakest...at least for me. However it is still somewhat better than Lanb.
>
> ---------------------------------


Coyote Blue is terrific. As are all his early works. I thought Fluke was his weakest but I liked Lamb quite a lot. A Dirty Job is slightly weaker than his earlier works (not as "elegantly balanced") but still really good and better than Fluke. At his worst he is pretty damned good, don't you think? (Of course, opinions may vary)
artifex
post #15  on May 28, 2006 - 1:59 PM PDT  
Weird, I have that book, but when you said the title, I thought of this Lamb. (Warning, synopsis spoils the movie)
radboy
post #16  on May 29, 2006 - 1:43 PM PDT  
> On May 24, 2006 - 12:59 PM PDT MollyGrue wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Lamb was good, but anything by Christopher Moore is excellent. I particularly like The Stupidest Angel.
>
> Recently I read Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach and now I'm reading As We Were by E.F. Benson about his family and childhood in the Victorian Era.
> ---------------------------------

Personally I think the best book by Christopher Moore is "The Lust Lizard of Paradise Cove".

People who like "Lamb" should also read anything by James Morrow particularly "Only Begotten Daughter" and "Blameless in Abbadon" but I must warn everybody these are extremely blasphemous books which denigrate every religion possible, god, and christianity specifically - (run don't walk to your nearest amazon hot button)

While on vacation recently I read "1912" about the election of 1912 a rather shallow, popular and vapid treatment of that year's election but which revealed this nugget: Talulah Bankhead's father was Speaker of the U.S House of Representatives and her grandfather was a prominent U.S. Senator (if only she had gone into politics instead!)
woozy
post #17  on May 29, 2006 - 8:29 PM PDT  

>
> Personally I think the best book by Christopher Moore is "The Lust Lizard of Paradise Cove".
>

I waver between that title and Island of the Sequined Love Nun, as my favorite. Actually, yeah, Lust Lizard is probably his best.

But hell, his worst is better than most.

I'll look into that book. Hadn't heard of it before.
radboy
post #18  on May 30, 2006 - 9:44 PM PDT  
> On May 29, 2006 - 8:29 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> >
> > Personally I think the best book by Christopher Moore is "The Lust Lizard of Paradise Cove".
> >
>
> I waver between that title and Island of the Sequined Love Nun, as my favorite. Actually, yeah, Lust Lizard is probably his best.
>
> But hell, his worst is better than most.
>
> I'll look into that book. Hadn't heard of it before.
> ---------------------------------

I have spent two days flagellating myself and snapping into place my extra-barbed opus dei clice belt as I got the title of the Christopher Moore book wrong - its actually "Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove". I am damned.

I forgot about "Island of Sequined Love Nun" between "Lust" and "Nun" these two are the best of the bunch by Moore but Woozie's comment that even his worst is better than most is soooo true.


MollyGrue
post #19  on May 30, 2006 - 11:05 PM PDT  
> Personally I think the best book by Christopher Moore is "The Lust Lizard of Paradise Cove".
>

Honestly, I have a soft spot for Practical Demonkeeping, the first book set in Pine Cove. I do have to admit that it was the many mentions of HP's Eggs of Shoggoth more than anything else.


> People who like "Lamb" should also read anything by James Morrow particularly "Only Begotten Daughter" and "Blameless in Abbadon" but I must warn everybody these are extremely blasphemous books which denigrate every religion possible, god, and christianity specifically - (run don't walk to your nearest amazon hot button)
>

I have tried to read Only Begotten Daughter, but got bored halfway through. I still have it and mean to give it another go.
woozy
post #20  on May 31, 2006 - 1:07 AM PDT  
> Honestly, I have a soft spot for Practical Demonkeeping, the first book set in Pine Cove. I do have to admit that it was the many mentions of HP's Eggs of Shoggoth more than anything else.
>

Well, while Island and Lust Lizard may be dripping with the laughs, Demon Keeping is certainly not chopped liver by any means. I, myself, have a soft spot for Bloodsucking Fiends, perhaps because I so frequently find myself in love with vampires. Or maybe it's because all SF Bay-areans are loyal to their Emperor.

And Coyote Blue is truly a hoot. I'm not sure how Chris Moore manages to get away with an utterly offensive line such as "If I'm not supposed to eat cats and fuck ugly women, then they shouldn't be so easy to catch" without getting strung up, but Thank God he does!
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