GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine Movie Talk
Home Releases
General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

Stanley Kubrick's The Shining
Topic by: harrizonn
Posted: January 20, 2003 - 10:25 AM PST
Last Reply: October 1, 2005 - 9:50 AM PDT

page  1  2      prev | next
author topic: Stanley Kubrick's The Shining
harrizonn
post #1  on January 20, 2003 - 10:25 AM PST  
does anyone know if the soundtrack was made FOR the film or if the film was set to the soundtrack? i know that Bartok died in 1945, but does anyone know if Krystof Penderecki worked with Kubrick to produce the soundtrack? or did Kubrick take already existing pieces (Polymorphia, de natura sonoris no.1 and no.2, the awakening of jacob, ewanjela and kanon paschy) and edit the film to them?

there's a big part of me that can't see Penderecki composing things to a film, but there's an even larger part of me whose jaw would drop if i found out The Shining was a big music video for insane atonal orchestra pieces.

steven
dpowers
post #2  on January 20, 2003 - 10:56 AM PST  
i don't know.

i can't find anything that says the pieces were composed for the movie. i found something that said:

Filmmakers Stanley Kubric and Wojciech Has were fascinated by Pendereckis music. The vast soundscapes, atonal chorales that wax and wane, all punctuated by jagged orchestration, provided perfect soundtracks for their renowned films Space Odyssey 2001, The Shining and the cult film The Saragossa Manuscript.

Eoliano
post #3  on January 20, 2003 - 12:25 PM PST  
>> does anyone know if Krystof Penderecki worked with Kubrick to produce the soundtrack?

I doubt that was the case.

Kubrick had considerable knowledge of classical music and he favored several 20th Century composers such as Bartok, Khachaturian, Ligeti and Penderecki, whose music can be heard on the soundtracks of 2001, The Shining and Eyes Wide Shut.

Kubrick carefully selected extracts from the works these composers because their otherworldly or eerie qualities effectively underlined the scenes in which they were used.
harrizonn
post #4  on January 20, 2003 - 2:09 PM PST  
> On January 20, 2003 - 12:25 PM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> >> does anyone know if Krystof Penderecki worked with Kubrick to produce the soundtrack?
>
> I doubt that was the case.
>
> Kubrick had considerable knowledge of classical music and he favored several 20th Century composers such as Bartok, Khachaturian, Ligeti and Penderecki, whose music can be heard on the soundtracks of 2001, The Shining and Eyes Wide Shut.
>
> Kubrick carefully selected extracts from the works these composers because their otherworldly or eerie qualities effectively underlined the scenes in which they were used.
> ---------------------------------

thanks... then consider my mind blown... in my mind, it turns The Shining into a big Penderecki Music video.

steven

Eoliano
post #5  on January 22, 2003 - 9:15 AM PST  
Here is the track listing for The Shining.

1. The Shining (Main Title)
(Wendy Carlos & Rachel Elkind)

2. Rocky Mountains"
(Wendy Carlos & Rachel Elkind)

3. Lontano
(György Ligeti)

4. Music For Strings, Percussion and Celesta (movement III)
(Béla Bartók)

5. The Awakening of Jacob
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

6. Utrenja - Ewangelia
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

7. Utrenja - Kanon Paschy
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

8. De Natura Sonoris No.1
(On the Nature of Sound)
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

9. De Natura Sonoris No.2
(On the Nature of Sound)
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

10. Polymorphia
(Krzysztof Penderecki)

11. Masquerade
(Jack Hylton and his Orchestra)

12. Midnight, the Stars and You
(Ray Noble & his Orchestra, Al Bowlly vocal)

13. It's All Forgotten Now
(Ray Noble & his Orchestra, Al Bowlly vocal)

14. Home
(Henry Hall & the Gleneagles Hotel Band)


Eoliano
post #6  on February 20, 2003 - 9:58 AM PST  
If you like Penderecki you might enjoy this very fine collection: Penderecki conducting Penderecki
Eoliano
post #7  on February 24, 2003 - 11:21 PM PST  
Re: Emomovieluver's review of Stephen King's The Shining

garden hedges coming to life?

In King's book, the topiary figures do indeed come to life.

It's obvious why Kubrick went as far as he did to remove all the superficial elements in his film adaptation of The Shining (flickering lamps, doors slamming shut of their own accord, fireplaces that flame on, etc.), not to mention excising much of King's use of psychic phenomena. Kubrick knew what would work; his interpretation followed an altogether different path and, as a result, its message is far more profound.


oldkingcole
post #8  on February 25, 2003 - 11:09 AM PST  
The Shining was released in 1980. Penderecki wrote the music long before that.

> On January 22, 2003 - 9:15 AM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Here is the track listing for The Shining.
>
> 5. The Awakening of Jacob
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)

This was written in 1971.

>
> 6. Utrenja - Ewangelia
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)
>
> 7. Utrenja - Kanon Paschy
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)
>

I'm not familiar with Utrenja, so I'm not sure when it was composed.

> 8. De Natura Sonoris No.1
> (On the Nature of Sound)
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)
>

Written in 1966.

> 9. De Natura Sonoris No.2
> (On the Nature of Sound)
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)

Great piece! Written in 1974.
>
> 10. Polymorphia
> (Krzysztof Penderecki)

I don't have a recording of this one; not sure when it was composed.

Eoliano
post #9  on February 25, 2003 - 11:29 AM PST  
>> The Shining was released in 1980. Penderecki wrote the music long before that.

>>> 10. Polymorphia

>> I don't have a recording of this one; not sure when it was composed.

Polymorphia for 48 strings - composed circa 1961.
Eoliano
post #10  on March 4, 2003 - 6:52 AM PST  
Re: Penderecki's Polymorphia for 48 strings - composed circa 1961.

It seems impossible to find a recording of this piece. Ligeti's music, however, is widely recorded and there are several excellent recent recordings of his work.
Eoliano
post #11  on March 4, 2003 - 3:43 PM PST  
Nice article Ray!
Eoliano
post #12  on September 29, 2005 - 9:12 AM PDT  
Check out this amusing trailer for The Shining!
pooja
post #13  on September 29, 2005 - 10:21 AM PDT  
> On September 29, 2005 - 9:12 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Check out this amusing trailer for The Shining!
> ---------------------------------

Don't let Uncle Eo fool you, children. This is what REALLY happens.
Warning! Spoilers!
Cinenaut
post #14  on September 29, 2005 - 4:51 PM PDT  
> On September 29, 2005 - 9:12 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Check out this amusing trailer for The Shining!
> ---------------------------------

That's hilarious. Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill is surely overused in feel-good movie trailers.
pooja
post #15  on September 30, 2005 - 6:37 AM PDT  
> On September 29, 2005 - 4:51 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> That's hilarious. Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill is surely overused in feel-good movie trailers.

Actually, for Bollywood films they would really make a trailer like that. They'd have a film like Zameen which is basically a military thriller. But they'll want as many people to come see it as possible, so they'll have one trailer with all the male characters standing around looking scary intercut with explosions and action shots. Then there'll be another trailer with bits from some of the Las Vegas style production numbers in the film. Then there's another one with the protagonist and the love interest staring into each other's eyes and strolling by a beautiful river and going for a Sunday drive, backed up with the song which is the film's love theme. You'd swear these trailers were for completely different films until the end, when the title of the film suddenly zooms up on screen.
Eoliano
post #16  on September 30, 2005 - 11:25 AM PDT  
About midway through there's another composer mixed in but I can't place the music or the composer, then right after that new music cue, there's a line from another Nicholson movie.

The trailer reminds me of a very misleading one for Mike Leigh's Naked, hardly a feel-good movie... I can't imagine what they were thinking.
Cinenaut
post #17  on September 30, 2005 - 11:32 AM PDT  
Apparently, it's Thomas Newman from the Shawshank Redemption soundtrack, according to posters over at Metafilter.com.
ahogue
post #18  on September 30, 2005 - 11:52 AM PDT  
Kubrick had a bad experience with Alex North, who wrote a score for 2001. Kubrick had gone through considerable lengths (so I've heard) to explain to North what he needed, and in the end fired him because he didn't like the results.

IIRC Kubrick had provided North with a meta-soundtrack of pre-existing music to work from, and after this fiasco (over which both men were still angry years later), he essentially adapted this exemplar and the soundtrack to 2001 was born.

From that point on there is very little original music in Kubrick's films. I think it's safe to assume that any music by a big name composer that shows up was not composed for the film. Sometimes the credits will actually give details as to the recordings used.

The one exception that comes to mind is Walter/Wendy Carlos, who IIRC was practically the only composer Kubric would work with for a long time. ...and wasn't the industrial synth music in Full Metal Jacket written by a relative of his?
ahogue
post #19  on September 30, 2005 - 11:54 AM PDT  
> On January 22, 2003 - 9:15 AM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Here is the track listing for The Shining.
> ---------------------------------

There may be a lot of Penderecki in there, but don't forget about the Ligeti and Bartok pieces! I particularly love the Bartok. Used to have a recording of it but I've no idea where it's gone...
Eoliano
post #20  on September 30, 2005 - 11:59 AM PDT  
Alex North comments on his score for 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Oh, and hoagie, you have an unanswered question here.
page  1  2      prev | next

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.