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General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

The Criterion Collection, Boutique Labels & Film Classics
Topic by: Eoliano
Posted: January 5, 2006 - 1:47 PM PST
Last Reply: January 29, 2007 - 3:50 PM PST

page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  >>      prev | next
author topic: The Criterion Collection, Boutique Labels & Film Classics
Eoliano
post #1  on January 5, 2006 - 1:47 PM PST  
The Criterion Collection - January Releases:

The Bad Sleep Well

A young executive hunts down his father's killer in director Akira Kurosawa's scathing The Bad Sleep Well. Continuing his legendary collaboration with actor Toshiro Mifune, Kurosawa combines elements of Hamlet and American film noir to chilling effect in exposing the corrupt boardrooms of postwar corporate Japan. (Rent)

The Virgin Spring

Winner of the 1961 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, Ingmar Bergman's The Virgin Spring is a harrowing tale of faith, revenge, and savagery in medieval Sweden. Starring Bergman stalwart and screen icon Max von Sydow, the film is both beautiful and cruel in its depiction of a world teetering between the sacred and the profane and one father's longing to avenge the murder of a child. (Rent)

The Criterion Collection - February Releases:

La bête humaine

Based on the classic Émile Zola novel, Jean Renoir's La bête humaine was one of the legendary director's greatest popular successes, tapping into the fatalism of a nation in despair. Jean Gabin's emblematic portrayal of doomed train engineer Jacques Lantier granted him a permanent place in the hearts of his countrymen. Part poetic realism, part film noir, the film is a hard-boiled and suspenseful journey into the tormented psyche of a workingman. (Rent)

Kind Hearts and Coronets

Director Robert Hamer's fiendishly funny Kind Hearts and Coronets stands as one of Ealing Studios' greatest triumphs, and one of the most wickedly black comedies ever made. Dennis Price is sublime as an embittered young commoner determined to avenge his mother's unjust disinheritance by ascending to the dukedom. Unfortunately, eight family members--all played by the incomparable Alec Guinness--must be eliminated before he can do so. (Rent)

Metropolitan

One of the most significant achievements of the American independent film movement of the 1990s, writer-director Whit Stillman's debut, Metropolitan, is a sparkling comedic chronicle of a middle-class young man's romantic misadventures among New York City's debutante society. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, Stillman's deft, literate script and hilariously high-brow observations mask a tender tale of adolescent anxiety. (Rent)

Young Mr. Lincoln

Few historical figures are as revered as Abraham Lincoln, and few director-star pairings embody classic American cinema as perfectly as do John Ford and Henry Fonda. In Young Mr. Lincoln, their first collaboration, Fonda gives one of the finest performances of his career as the young president-to-be struggling with an incendiary murder case as a novice lawyer. Compassionate and assured, this indelible piece of Americana marks the beginning of Ford and Fonda's ascent to legendary status. (Rent)
Eoliano
post #2  on January 5, 2006 - 1:58 PM PST  
The Criterion Collection - March Releases:

The Children Are Watching Us

In his first collaboration with renowned screenwriter and longtime partner Cesare Zavattini, Vittoria De Sica examines the cataclysmic consequences of adult folly on an innocent child. Heralding the pair's subsequent work on some of the masterpieces of Italian neorealism, The Children Are Watching Us is a deeply humane, vivid portrait of one family's disintegration. (Rent)

The Complete Mr. Arkadin

Orson Welles's Mr. Arkadin (a.k.a. Confidential Report) is one of cinema's great mysteries. How did a globetrotting narrative of espionage, amnesia, and backstabbing come to be itself marked by these qualities? In the film, small-time American smuggler Guy van Stratten is hired by elusive billionaire Gregory Arkadin to investigate the tycoon's past. What follows is a dizzying descent into the Cold War landscape of a Europe trying to erase its history. In making the film, Welles was ultimately banned from the editing room by producer Louis Dolivet. As a result, many versions exist, none of them definitive. The Criterion Collection is proud to collect the many faces of Mr. Arkadin into one box for the first time--from the story's beginnings in radio to the novel published under Welles's name to an all-new "comprehensive version" of the film.

Fists in the Pocket

A dark and perverse portrait of family dysfunction, Fists in the Pocket stunned moviegoers and critics alike when it arrived on the scene in 1965--the feature debut of a then twenty-five-year old Marco Bellocchio. This award-winning work certainly heralded the arrival of a powerful filmmaking voice, and it continues to rank as a truly unique classic of Italian cinema.

3 Films by Louis Malle

Few directors have portrayed the agonies and epiphanies of growing up as poetically--and scandalously--as Louis Malle. Laced with autobiographical details, Murmur of the Heart, Lacombe, Lucien and Au revoir les enfants tell stories of youth, set against the tumult of World War II and postwar France. Controversial, tragic, amusing, and poignant, these three films are not just coming-of-age stories but the director's ongoing response to a world gone wrong, revealing his true nature as rebel. These titles are available individually or as part of the boxset

Murmur of the Heart

Louis Malle's critically acclaimed Murmur of the Heart gracefully combines elements of comedy, drama, and autobiography in a candid portrait of a precocious fifteen-year-old boy's sexual maturation. Both shocking and deeply poignant, this is one of the finest coming-of-age films ever made.

Lacombe, Lucien

One of the first French films to address the issue of collaboration during the German Occupation, Louis Malle's brave and controversial Lacombe, Lucien traces a young peasant's journey from potential Resistance member to Gestapo recruit. At once the story of a nation and one troubled boy's horrific coming of age, the film is a disquieting portrait of lost innocence and guilt.

Au revoir les enfants

Au revoir les enfants tells a heartbreaking story of friendship and devastating loss between two boys living in Nazi-occupied France. At a provincial Catholic boarding school, the precocious youths enjoy true camaraderie--until a secret is revealed. Based on events from writer-director Malle's own childhood, the film is a subtle, precisely observed tale of courage, cowardice, and tragic awakening. (Rent)

Please note: The Complete Mr. Arkadin, Fists in the Pocket, Murmur of the Heart and Lacombe, Lucien have yet to be added to the GreenCine Catalog. Rental links for these titles will be added when they become available.
DLeonard
post #3  on January 5, 2006 - 2:13 PM PST  
oooooooooooooooo, new thread. Nice.

Looks like Antonioni's The Passenger just got a release date. March 14th.

Unfortunately, it's not through Criterion though.
Eoliano
post #4  on January 5, 2006 - 2:49 PM PST  
> oooooooooooooooo, new thread. Nice.

Thanks DL!

> Looks like Antonioni's The Passenger just got a release date. March 14th.

> Unfortunately, it's not through Criterion though.

Unfortunately not, but there is still hope that Criterion might release La Notte and Red Desert sometime in the not too distant future.

However, the good news is that the Sony disc of The Passenger will not be a bare-bones edition, and will include an audio commentary with Jack Nicholson, another with Wim Wenders, An Evening at the Academy Featurette, and interviews with screenwriter Mark Peploe and actress Maria Schneider. The cover art is a major letdown.

From DVDActive.com:

"Sony Pictures Home Entertainment has announced a new release of The Passenger which stars Jack Nicholson and Maria Schneider. Originally released in 1975, the film is a suspenseful and haunting portrait of a drained journalist whose deliverance is an identity exchange with a dead man. The disc will be available to own from the 14th March, priced at around $24.96."

Coming Soon:

Criterion April Releases!
underdog
post #5  on January 6, 2006 - 11:04 AM PST  
> On January 5, 2006 - 2:13 PM PST DLeonard wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> oooooooooooooooo, new thread. Nice.
>
> Looks like Antonioni's The Passenger just got a release date. March 14th.
>
> Unfortunately, it's not through Criterion though.
> ---------------------------------

Yeah, I think despite the fact that it won't be a Criterion release, The Passenger should be a fine disc nonetheless. They restored it for its limited, recent theatrical run, back to the right length and cut and cleaned the print up and it should be just dandy. Can't wait!

Eoliano
post #6  on January 6, 2006 - 7:37 PM PST  
> Yeah, I think despite the fact that it won't be a Criterion release, The Passenger should be a fine disc nonetheless. They restored it for its limited, recent theatrical run, back to the right length and cut and cleaned the print up and it should be just dandy. Can't wait!

Saw it twice at two different venues because I was unhappy with the screening at venue # 1 which seemed too grainy and slightly out of focus, plus the colors seemed weak from what I originally recall some 20 odd years ago. While the print at venue # 2 was a marked improvement, it was still a tad grainy with the same noticeable color weaknesses, however, I'll wager Sony's DVD will shine. Here's hoping. Having separate commentaries by Nicholson and Wenders should prove interesting, especially that of Nicholson, whose reminiscences should be amusing as well as enlightening since he lived through the entire filmmaking experience, as did Peploe and Schneider.
Eoliano
post #7  on January 6, 2006 - 7:50 PM PST  
The Criterion Collection - April Releases

Monterey Pop (single-disc edition)

On a June weekend in 1967, at the height of the 'Summer of Love,' the Monterey International Pop Festival ushered in a new era of rock and roll and launched the careers of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Otis Redding, as well as showcasing veteran performers such as Simon & Garfunkel, The Mamas & the Papas, The Who, and the extraordinary Ravi Shankar. Filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker captured it all, immortalizing those moments that have become legend. Now available for the first time as a single-disc release.

Jimi Plays Monterey/Shake! Otis at Monterey

Jimi Hendrix and Otis Redding arrived in California virtually unknown. Hendrix exploded at Monterey, flooring an unsuspecting audience with his maniacal six-string pyrotechnics. Redding, venerable star of Memphis' Stax record label, seduced the 'love crowd' in one of his best performances, which would be his last. Featuring the entire Monterey sets of these legendary musicians, and now available for the first time as a single-disc release.

The 400 Blows

François Truffaut's first and most personal feature film, told from the perspective of the director's lifelong cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel. Sensitively recreating the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, The 400 Blows unsentimentally portrays aloof parents, oppressive teachers, petty crime, and a friendship that would last a lifetime. Available after a long absence as a single-disc release.

Elevator to the Gallows

In this, his debut feature film, director Louis Malle captures the hidden beauty of Jeanne Moreau, the brilliant camerawork of Henri Decaë, and the musical force of Miles Davis in a tightly constructed film noir experience that launched his and Moreau's careers.

Harlan County, U.S.A.

In 1973, when the Brookside coal miners voted to join the United Mine Workers union, The Duke Power Company refused to sign the union's contact. The struggle that broke out between the company and the workers was brilliantly documented by Barbara Kopple in this Academy Award­winning documentary. With a haunting country and bluegrass soundtrack, Harlan County, U.S.A. is a powerful, sometimes heartbreaking record of the thirteen-month struggle between a community fighting to survive and a corporation dedicated to the bottom line.

Grey Gardens (two-disc edition)

Meet Big and Little Edie Beale, high society dropouts, mother and daughter, reclusive cousins of Jackie O., thriving together amid the decay and disorder of their ramshackle East Hampton mansion. This intimate portrait has since become a cult classic and established Little Edie as a fashion icon and philosopher queen. Now available as a two-disc edition with newly available supplements.

Announcement:

Viridiana delayed!

Banned in Spain and denounced by the Vatican, Luis Buñuel's hilarious vision of life as a beggar's banquet is regarded by many as his masterpiece. In it, the young novice Viridiana does her utmost to maintain her Catholic principles, but her lecherous uncle and a motley assemblage of paupers force her to confront the limits of her idealism. Winner of the Palme d'Or at the 1961 Cannes Film Festival, this anticlerical free-for-all is as shocking today as ever.

Silvia Pinal to Appear on Upcoming Viridiana Release

We are pleased to announce that we have secured a video interview with Silvia Pinal, the luminous star of Luis Buñuel's Viridiana, for inclusion on our upcoming release of the film. This eleventh-hour addition will require us to postpone the street date, but given Pinal's contributions to this and other of Bunuel's Mexican/Spanish films, we feel it's well worth the wait. Look for Viridiana in May of 2006!
Eoliano
post #8  on January 9, 2006 - 11:46 AM PST  
Leonard Maltin (of all people) reports that Criterion will release Claude Sautet's rarely seen 1960 crime flick, Classe tous risques. The film stars Lino Ventura and Jean-Paul Belmondo, featuring Sandra Milo and Marcel in supporting roles, with music by Georges Delarue and cinematography by Ghislain Cloquet. A new print of Classe tous risques is currently touring the country. Check the Rialto Pictures website for details.
Eoliano
post #9  on January 11, 2006 - 1:45 PM PST  
From the Criterion Newsletter:

Criterion has just announced that Yasujiro Ozu's Late Spring will arrive sometime this year.

sorry tale: last year no ozu
this year, late spring
Eoliano
post #10  on January 11, 2006 - 1:58 PM PST  
More from the Criterion Newsletter:

Criterion Postcards!

"Thanks also to all of you who have written in about the postcards now appearing in select Criterion releases. We launched with four designs--Le samouraï, Masculin féminin, Tales of Hoffmann, and Ugetsu--and the enthusiastic response we've received has been very gratifying. In the coming months, we will continue to expand the postcard offerings to include original DVD and theatrical release art (click here to see those currently available). These postcards will be placed in first printings of single-edition releases as well as in single-edition catalog titles."
underdog
post #11  on January 11, 2006 - 2:09 PM PST  
What do you think of Criterion's box design for the new edition of Bad Sleep Well? It's one of the few I've seen from them that I'd categorize as ugly. But maybe it'll grow on me.

Eoliano
post #12  on January 11, 2006 - 2:19 PM PST  
Just realized that with their release of Late Spring, Criterion will now have committed the complete "Noriko Trilogy" to DVD, which also includes Tokyo Story and Early Summer, and all of which feature the lovely Setsuko Hara.
Eoliano
post #13  on January 11, 2006 - 3:16 PM PST  
> What do you think of Criterion's box design for the new edition of Bad Sleep Well? It's one of the few I've seen from them that I'd categorize as ugly. But maybe it'll grow on me.

Hmm, ugly, like hate, is a strong word, though if you haven't seen the film, then I can understand how you might not like the cover. However, given the significance of the building to the plot and more specifically, the ironic appearance of its beautifully re-imagined 'double' in the first scene, I kind of appreciate its simplicity.

Anyhow, I think the least attractive cover designs of late were those for the Rebel Samurai films, while the most controversial is the one for Viridiana, which has sparked quite a debate at criterionforum.org, where it has been called everything from horrible to irrelevant, and one of worst Criterion covers ever.
Eoliano
post #14  on January 11, 2006 - 3:55 PM PST  
Attention Bay Area Filmgoers -- From the Criterion Homepage:

The Balboa Theater at San Francisco's Palace of Fine Arts begins its Noir City Film Festival this week. Curated by Anita Monga, the former, long-time programmer for the city's Castro Theater, this wide selection of classic Hollywood noirs and more recent neonoirs runs from Friday, January 13, to Thursday, January 26, and includes two from the Criterion catalog: Jules Dassin's breathless Thieves' Highway and Robert Siodmak's definitive 1946 noir The Killers. Here's your chance to see them on the big screen.

Sponsored in part by GreenCine!
Eoliano
post #15  on January 13, 2006 - 12:24 PM PST  
Since it was removed from Criterion's Coming Soon page, it looks like the three-disc set of The Complete Mr. Arkadin has been delayed until April or May.
Eoliano
post #16  on January 13, 2006 - 2:13 PM PST  
New releases from Eureka's The Masters of Cinema series:


Nicholas Ray's The Savage Innocents starring Anthony Quinn and Peter O'Toole.

"Nicholas Ray's epic 1959 film about Eskimo life was unfairly victimized on release, censored at the UK cinema, and neglected by both TV and home video for decades. The Savage Innocents continued Ray's fascination with alternative lifestyles--examining the life of Eskimos and their remoteness from "civilzised" values. It represents Ray's first and most ambitious attempt to break free from Hollywood and forge his own route."

DVDBeaver review


Masahiro Shinoda's Assassination

"Assassination (or Ansatsu) marked Masahiro Shinoda's first attempt at a period film, and is widely considered to be his finest achievement. Previously gaining fame and status alongside Nagisa Oshima and Kiju Yoshida, challenging established Japanese cinema with tales of reckless youth, The Dry Lake (1960) and the seminal yakuza drama Pale Flower (1964) Shinoda graduated from Shochiku, where, like Shohei Imamura, his grounding was working as an assistant to Yasujiro Ozu.

DVDBeaver review


Coming soon:

Keisuke Kinoshita's Twenty-Four Eyes

"Keisuke Kinoshita's Twenty-Four Eyes--which beat Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai as Kinema Junpo's Best Film of 1954 and won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Film in 1955--is one of Japan's most beloved films. In 1999 it was picked by Japanese critics as one of the ten best Japanese films of all time. Both a huge commercial and critical success, this deeply affecting anti-war film has, according to the critic Sato Tadao, "wrung more tears out of Japanese audiences than any other post-war film"."

John Ford's The Prisoner of Shark Island

"Based on the true-life case of the incarceration of Dr. Samuel Mudd (Oscar-winning Warner Baxter), The Prisoner of Shark Island is a stirring account of the victimization of a simple man. This fast-moving and gripping drama--rarely seen and remarkably timeless--follows Mudd through a calamitous series of brutal encounters. Driven by selfless integrity and his honourable commitment to duty, Mudd exemplifies the quintessential Ford hero who has become, unwittingly, an enemy of the people. Regarded as a personal favourite by the director, it was also the film he was said to be most happy with."
lizzoqops
post #17  on January 14, 2006 - 1:22 AM PST  
> On January 11, 2006 - 3:55 PM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Attention Bay Area Filmgoers -- From the Criterion Homepage:
>
> The Balboa Theater at San Francisco's Palace of Fine Arts begins its Noir City Film Festival this week. Curated by Anita Monga, the former, long-time programmer for the city's Castro Theater, this wide selection of classic Hollywood noirs and more recent neonoirs runs from Friday, January 13, to Thursday, January 26, and includes two from the Criterion catalog: Jules Dassin's breathless Thieves' Highway and Robert Siodmak's definitive 1946 noir The Killers. Here's your chance to see them on the big screen.
>
> Sponsored in part by GreenCine!
> ---------------------------------

Saw "Strangers on a Train" and "They Live By Night" and Farley Granger. He's old, but it was cool. They Live...just as good as ever. "Strangers on a Train" was one of those movies I put off watching for a long time, I kept thinking I would see it in a theater. Then I gave up and watched it on tv. Much better and more fun in a theater.

On Topic: "The Bad Sleep Well" looks so nice on dvd. I can throw the old copy away (TCM? Copy of New Yorker? I don't even remember where I got it). And I like the cover.
Eoliano
post #18  on January 14, 2006 - 10:41 AM PST  
> Saw "Strangers on a Train" and "They Live By Night" and Farley Granger. He's old, but it was cool. They Live...just as good as ever.

Both are terrific and Strangers on a Train arguably the finest adaptation of a Highsmith novel (Clement's Purple Noon comes close). Haven't seen They Live By Night in decades... shame it's not on DVD. Granger must be at least 80 by now, n'est-ce pas? A pity that no one has used him to his best advantage in all these years. Did you see these films in SF or did you catch them elsewhere?

> On Topic: "The Bad Sleep Well" looks so nice on dvd. I can throw the old copy away (TCM? Copy of New Yorker? I don't even remember where I got it). And I like the cover.

Indeed, it looks terrific. I still have an old tape of the Criterion laserdisc and the dreadful old Mei Ah DVD, though I understand they are improving their transfers and subs, but alas, no Kurosawa.

Btw, discussing classic films (especially those mentioned here) is hardly off-topic.
Eoliano
post #19  on January 15, 2006 - 9:30 AM PST  
Coming to the Brooklyn Acadamy of Music:

Man of the Dunes: Hiroshi Teshigahara February 24 - March 19

The son of Japan's foremost Ikebana (the art of flower-arranging) expert, Hiroshi Teshigahara has lived a dozen different lives as an artist: sculptor, painter, opera director, interior designer, writer, and more. His visual art background combined with his taste for the eccentric, lead him to create films that flirted with the avant-garde and pushed the boundaries of what could be seen on Japanese screens.

Films to include: Antonio Gaudi (1984), Pitfall (1962), Summer Soldiers (1972), The Face of Another (1966) and Woman in the Dunes (1964).
Eoliano
post #20  on January 15, 2006 - 12:45 PM PST  
Coming soon from NoShame Films:

Valerio Zurlini's The Desert of the Tarters/Il Deserto dei Tartari

Beau Geste meets Waiting for Godot in this haunting adaptation of renowned Italian writer Dino Buzzati's controversial 1938 novel about life, honor, mystery, paranoia and death during wartime.

Rarely screened outside Europe since its 1976 premiere, The Desert of the Tarters was the last film from Italian director Valerio Zurlini before his death in 1982.

A multi-national co-production, The Desert of the Tarters makes atmospheric use of Iran's 2000 year-old Bam Citadel, where Zurlini and crew filmed on the eve of the 1979 revolution that changed world politics forever. As timely now as the day it was made, The Desert of the Tarters is a study of the madness of warfare in the tradition of All Quiet on the Western Front and Apocalypse Now.

The film features performances by Vittorio Gassman, Giuliano Gemma, Helmut Griem, Jacques Perrin, Philippe Noiret, Fernando Rey, Francisco Rabal, Jean-Louis Trintignant, and Max Von Sydow, with a score by Ennio Morricone.
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