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General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

Blade Runner the ultimate question (spoliers)
Topic by: AstroAppa
Posted: January 6, 2008 - 6:11 PM PST
Last Reply: January 9, 2008 - 11:46 PM PST

author topic: Blade Runner the ultimate question (spoliers)
AstroAppa
post #1  on January 6, 2008 - 6:11 PM PST  
So I just finished watching Blade Runner: Final Cut, and I am now truly convinced that Rick Deckard is a replicant.

This actually has been bugging me ever since I saw the original movie back in the day, and there has never really been a definitive answer: Ridley Scott said 'yes', Harrison Ford said 'no'. Having multiple versions each with a different angle, it was actually kind of frustrating...

I was wondering what you guys thought about it. For me, after watching the Final Cut, it is leaning towards Deckard being a replicant. So here is my evidence...Almost every replicant in the movie has their eyes glow red at some point, even the fake owl. Rick Deckard has his eyes glow the same way in one scene. At the end, Deckards partner (Gaff) goes on to say that he did a 'man's job', hinting that he is not a human. However, I think that the unicorn dream sequence gives the viewer the answer. I think that shows that Gaff knows Deckards dreams, like how Deckard knew Rachael's dreams.

Anywho...I was just curious to see if anyone thought otherwise, or had any other opinions about it...all in all a GREAT movie, and I think that the Fianl Cut is my favorite version yet...(didn't really like the voice over ones too much)

p.s hope everyone had an AWESOME break!
Vanamonde
post #2  on January 6, 2008 - 7:22 PM PST  
I think you make an excellent case. I really loved this version. The restoration is so nice.

I didn't really notice any change from the previous cut (without the voiceover) except with Roy meets Tyrell. He says, "I want more life, Father". I remember a much different and stronger F-word. But the mind is a terrible thang.

I must own this disc. Renting was not enough.
MsManners
post #3  on January 7, 2008 - 1:01 PM PST  
I haven't seen the new version, but I have seen the original about a BIGILLION times. I love that movie! why i don't have it in my personal collection? i will never know.
Here is what I think, though, in response to your question:

the replicants are virtually identical to humans, except in their lack of empathy (which is implied to be locus of humanity). they are marketed to be ‚¨SMore human than human‚¨ and yet lack any developed authentic ego due b/c they are provided with a prosthetic memory in the form of photographs and implanted memories. Having said that, in the movie, memory, vision, and identity are all fragmented and yet intertwined as it attempts to establish memory, not empathy, as the locus of humanity. The replicants simultaneously search for an elusive reality as well as for themselves through their memories and photographs, right? This need persists despite the fact that the dominant characteristic of those memories is unreliability. Nevertheless, the replicants‚¨" dependence on their small collections of photographs as a means of explanation of their existence leads me to question why, if the replicants are aware of their actual reality, do they constantly return to their photographs? It is because of this that I believe Deckard IS a replicant.
underdog
post #4  on January 7, 2008 - 1:13 PM PST  
I like leaving this open to question and I have a feeling Ridley Scott does, too. But in an interview I heard with him on NPR last month (or maybe it was on Elvis Mitchell's The Treatment, I can't remember off-hand, but if I do I'll link to it here...), Scott mentioned an anecdote about the two screenwriters who co-wrote the film. They passed drafts back and forth and one of the writers made a passing reference to something about Deckard that basically reveals he's a replicant, but it was sort of accidental. The other screenwriter said, "huh! I hadn't thought of this, but I like it." In other words, it was sort of in passing, or a passing allusion, but wasn't the original intention. But it's there.

But Harrison Ford thought, no way, Deckard's not a replicant.

And Ridley Scott likes people debating it.

So there you are. He is. But he also could not be. ;-)

Btw, I got the final cut as a birthday gift but haven't watched it yet. Can't wait to geek out!
Vanamonde
post #5  on January 7, 2008 - 10:06 PM PST  
You know the scene where Roy meets his maker (Tyrell), and Tyrell convinces him with a flurry of techno-jargon that while he can design an organism and make it, he cannot change that genome without killing it or giving it cancer.

Does anyknow if this has any basis in fact? With the advances in genetic engineering, will we be able to change ourselves or only custom design our children.
manuelvillanueva
post #6  on January 8, 2008 - 2:11 AM PST  
Great movie! It was one of those films everyone tried to copy. I never knew what Deker was supposed to be either. MsManner's mention of memory to make replicants more human is an interesting point. Even replicants are fooled into believing they're human based on this: Memories become their raison d'etre.

I don't read Jane Austen but I came across her quote illustrating memory:

"If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out."
hardcle
post #7  on January 8, 2008 - 5:36 PM PST  
> On January 7, 2008 - 1:13 PM PST underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I like leaving this open to question and I have a feeling Ridley Scott does, too.
>
> But Harrison Ford thought, no way, Deckard's not a replicant.
>
> And Ridley Scott likes people debating it.
>
You're mistaken on this one. I've heard Scott state more than once that Deckard is a replicant. Most recently here:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17450340

As for Ford: Scott says, "I'm the one cutting the movie. Sorry, Harry."
underdog
post #8  on January 8, 2008 - 5:40 PM PST  
> On January 8, 2008 - 5:36 PM PST hardcle wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On January 7, 2008 - 1:13 PM PST underdog wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > I like leaving this open to question and I have a feeling Ridley Scott does, too.
> >
> > But Harrison Ford thought, no way, Deckard's not a replicant.
> >
> > And Ridley Scott likes people debating it.
> >
> You're mistaken on this one. I've heard Scott state more than once that Deckard is a replicant. Most recently here:
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17450340
>
> As for Ford: Scott says, "I'm the one cutting the movie. Sorry, Harry."
>
> ---------------------------------

Hah hah. That's right! I read that, too. Funny, though, in that one recent interview I alluded to, Scott sounded more ambivalent, but maybe I mis-heard him, or he was just weary about the debate. But yeah, I think he's convinced about it now, it's just that he, and one of the screenwriters at least, didn't consider it at first. But liked the idea. And then Ford was against it, but as you said, tough nuts, Harry!
AstroAppa
post #9  on January 9, 2008 - 12:55 AM PST  
> On January 8, 2008 - 5:36 PM PST hardcle wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On January 7, 2008 - 1:13 PM PST underdog wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > I like leaving this open to question and I have a feeling Ridley Scott does, too.
> >
> > But Harrison Ford thought, no way, Deckard's not a replicant.
> >
> > And Ridley Scott likes people debating it.
> >
> You're mistaken on this one. I've heard Scott state more than once that Deckard is a replicant. Most recently here:
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17450340
>
> As for Ford: Scott says, "I'm the one cutting the movie. Sorry, Harry."
>
> ---------------------------------

So, ignoring all the signs and suggestions, which way makes it a better movie? I know Harrison Ford believes that Deckard was not a replicant because he feels that the audience needs someone to relate to in the movie...what do you think? Personally, I would kind of prefer that Deckard was human. Or atleast keep the answer more ambiguous. I don't know that's just me.

Oh yeah, I liked the change from f**ker to father. A less harsh word that packed more of a emotional punch then the former.
troublemaker
post #10  on January 9, 2008 - 11:46 PM PST  
In the director's cut it seems pretty clear doesn't it? Deckard has the unicorn dream only for the film to end with one of the policemen putting the origami unicorn out in front of his door. I mean, no one outright says it but what do you want, a giant neon sign reading "Deckard IS A ROBOT! BUM BUM BUUUM!!"

For me personally, the film become infinitely more rewarding with Deckard being a replicant. I like the dimension it adds.

Blade Runner is such a gorgeous film. Whenever I end up saving enough for an HDtv, this will be one of the first blu-ray discs I'll be picking up.

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