GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine Movie Talk
Home Releases
General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

What movies are better the second time around?
Topic by: Cinenaut
Posted: April 13, 2009 - 9:16 AM PDT
Last Reply: October 14, 2009 - 1:35 PM PDT

author topic: What movies are better the second time around?
Cinenaut
post #1  on April 13, 2009 - 9:16 AM PDT  
Guardian.co.uk posts the question: What films are better on the second viewing?

I have to concur with some of the commenters who mentioned The Big Lebowski.

What movies did you enjoy more the second time around, and why?
underdog
post #2  on April 13, 2009 - 10:26 AM PDT  
> On April 13, 2009 - 9:16 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Guardian.co.uk posts the question: What films are better on the second viewing?
>
> I have to concur with some of the commenters who mentioned The Big Lebowski.
>
> What movies did you enjoy more the second time around, and why?
> ---------------------------------

Yeah Big Lebowski is definitely on my list as well -- I remember enjoying it in the theater the first time around but also being a huge Coen Bros fan and feeling like they were just sorta slumming it. And then I saw it again, and laughed more. And a third time, ditto. And so on. Now I love it.

Also: Dazed and Confused -- which I liked just fine the first time, mind you, but really appreciated on more levels on repeated viewings...

Best in Show

Paprika (just because I was totally lost the first time I saw it, even though it's visually dazzling right off the bat)

weezy
post #3  on April 14, 2009 - 9:43 AM PDT  
Good picks, underdog! Reminded me that This is Spinal Tap is funnier every time - the Stonehenge scene never fails to slay me. But I could, too, watch Best in Show over and over again for the doggies alone. My picks -

Goodfellas (even when it's playing on the History channel and censored)
Casino
THE ROCK!!!! 100% testosterone, baby.
Rocky IV (it's a Christmas tradition)
Ghost in the Shell
Ratatouille
Andy Goldsworthy's Rivers and Tides
Grizzly Man
Cinenaut
post #4  on April 14, 2009 - 4:27 PM PDT  
A lot of Christopher Guest movies probably qualify for this. With certain types of humor, you might be absorbed in the surface detail and the broad jokes the first time around, and then the second time you notice the subtle stuff.
Vanamonde
post #5  on April 16, 2009 - 5:48 AM PDT  
> On April 13, 2009 - 10:26 AM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Also: Dazed and Confused -- which I liked just fine the first time, mind you, but really appreciated on more levels on repeated viewings...
>
ugh. I did not like it. Everyone in it is sooo stupid. As I remember, kids in middle school has more brains that the high schoolers in this film.

I much prefer Linkletter's earlier film, "Slacker". I have enjoyed it many times.

And I know that many will disagree, but I love "Titanic". The music is so good, I love the acting, I love that from when the iceberg hits until Rose is rescued, the film occurs in real-time, but most of all, the true tale of what happens when we put far too much faith in our technology just resonates with my soul.

But, for the rest of my life, at least one or twice a year, I will HAVE to watch The Greatest Movies Ever Made, "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, the Expanded Edition.

"It is a war movie that hates movie". And I never dreamed that I would live to see it made into such a great, great movie.

And for some reason, I am soooo dementedly obsessed with "The End of Evangelion". I have to watch it again very so often. This does trouble me, but then I have always be drawn to End of the World stories. I cannot wait until the new version, 4.0 - and I pray it does make it to Third Impact!
underdog
post #6  on April 16, 2009 - 1:07 PM PDT  
What about Darren Aronofsky's Pi? I remember thinking it either a bit overrated first time or at least I really didn't get it. Then I was much more into it the 2nd time around. I really appreciate it more now, though I can't see it as one I'll watch multiple times, unlike the Big Lebowski.
troublemaker
post #7  on April 29, 2009 - 12:02 PM PDT  
Mulholland Drive always struck me as a great film to watch the second time around. I remember the first time watching that film in theaters and a father and son both walked in right as the movie began. On exiting they turned to us and asked, "did we, umm.. miss something?" We all laughed, collectively agreeing on our confusion but loving what we just experienced.

Also throwing in Ghostbusters because that film I had watched maybe 40 times as a kid (wore out my dad's laserdisc) and only when I watched it again in my late teens did I get some of Bill Murray's jokes and the scene involving Dr. Stantz and a ghost giving him a paranormal BJ.
Cinenaut
post #8  on June 10, 2009 - 4:52 PM PDT  
A lot of David Lynch movies probably qualify for this topic, but Mulholland Drive is an excellent example.

And movies that improve as you age is almost a whole other topic. For example, I saw The Man Who Fell to Earth in the theater when I was a kid. I should probably watch it again now for a whole new perspective.

> On April 29, 2009 - 12:02 PM PDT troublemaker wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Mulholland Drive always struck me as a great film to watch the second time around. I remember the first time watching that film in theaters and a father and son both walked in right as the movie began. On exiting they turned to us and asked, "did we, umm.. miss something?" We all laughed, collectively agreeing on our confusion but loving what we just experienced.
>
> Also throwing in Ghostbusters because that film I had watched maybe 40 times as a kid (wore out my dad's laserdisc) and only when I watched it again in my late teens did I get some of Bill Murray's jokes and the scene involving Dr. Stantz and a ghost giving him a paranormal BJ.
> ---------------------------------

janeskid
post #9  on June 11, 2009 - 9:59 AM PDT  
The spouse and I tend to watch only older foreign movies, 1945-80 (We both need subtitles or captions anyway so why not enjoy the foreign stuff?) We need to watch many of these twice but with Japanese movies a second or third viewing is almost an absolute requirement. Some become quite good after awhile.
Vanamonde
post #10  on October 12, 2009 - 7:17 PM PDT  
> On June 10, 2009 - 4:52 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> And movies that improve as you age is almost a whole other topic. For example, I saw The Man Who Fell to Earth in the theater when I was a kid. I should probably watch it again now for a whole new perspective.
>
I thought it holds up well. Same for Forbidden Planet.

Now, I was not a kid but FAR too young to be taking sooo much acid when I first saw "Catch 22". Not recommended. But the film worked very well this summer when I rented it.
Cinenaut
post #11  on October 13, 2009 - 10:35 AM PDT  
I've actually never seen "Catch-22" all the way through, so I just queued it up.

underdog
post #12  on October 13, 2009 - 12:17 PM PDT  
> On October 13, 2009 - 10:35 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I've actually never seen "Catch-22" all the way through, so I just queued it up.
>
>
> ---------------------------------

It's such a difficult book to adapt properly. I feel about the film now the way I've felt about the Slaughterhouse Five movie -- both are better than the original reviews they received, and both did about as good a job as you could in adapting those books, but they still don't hold a candle to the experience of reading them. Catch-22 may be a little dated at this point, too, but I still recommend the film. What a cast, too!
janeskid
post #13  on October 14, 2009 - 9:56 AM PDT  
Fellini's Roma has a lot of background stuff we didn't see on the first time through. Also some uncredited actors.

Similarly Fellini Satyricon (1969). And Caligula, the blue label has more background action I think.
Cinenaut
post #14  on October 14, 2009 - 1:35 PM PDT  
The same probably goes for a lot of Fellini movies.

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.