GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine Movie Talk
Home Releases
General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

favorite movie soundtracks?
Topic by: artifex
Posted: December 6, 2003 - 1:28 PM PST
Last Reply: December 27, 2004 - 10:52 AM PST

page  1  2  3  4      prev | next
author topic: favorite movie soundtracks?
artifex
post #1  on December 6, 2003 - 1:28 PM PST  
What's your favorite movie soundtrack?
Let's leave out anime, because there's a separate thread going for anime soundtracks, but any other genre is fair game.

Had to ask, as I was watching The Last Temptation of Christ overnight. I don't know if this is my favorite soundtrack, but it's the only one I know so much about, so it probably is. The soundtrack on this movie is so good, that sections were later used as background music for at least one Olympic Games' broadcasts, and the soundtrack album, called "Passions," became the foundation work for Peter Gabriel's Real World music label. There was even a (relatively rare) secondary album of additional work by the same artists, called "Passion Sources," which I am proud to say I also own. :)

(If you can't think of any, just mention a Glass or Vangelis soundtrack, as we're sure to agree on those as well)
dpowers
post #2  on December 6, 2003 - 5:42 PM PST  
bebe and louis barron: forbidden planet - click pop weeeyooo

duke ellington: anatomy of a murder - oooo so jazzy

jan klusák: erotikon - new acoustic score for 1929 movie directed by g. machaty - mesmerizing

michel legrand: the umbrellas of cherbourg - ah, me

neil young: dead man - clang jangle strum
hamano
post #3  on December 6, 2003 - 10:26 PM PST  
Well, since you mentioned Glass, my favorite of his...
Mishima
Powaqqatsi

Michael Nyman's score for Prospero's Books. Nyman is my favorite film composer, but if we're going to pick the entire score for ONE film he did, it would have to be that. Other favorite film composers whose entire body of work I admire, as opposed to single film scores, are Nino Rota (Fellini and others' films) and Ennio Morricone (a huge body of work, including Sergio Leone's films). I'm sure others will mention them on this thread.

Sally Potter's own score for Orlando, which sounded a lot like Nyman.

John Carpenter's own score for Dark Star

Woody Allen's Love and Death which used Lieutenant Kije by Prokofiev and other Russian favorites...

Maurice Jarre's score for The Year of Living Dangerously

Riyuichi Sakamoto's score for Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence with a little help from David Sylvian on vocals. Available on DVD everywhere except America!

Various Jamaicans for The Harder They Come, the soundtrack to my college days.

Oh, and Captain Beefheart, Blue Collar!
jaimetout
post #4  on December 7, 2003 - 9:13 AM PST  
Hanns Eisler's score for Resnais' NIGHT AND FOG has always been one of my favorites.
jaimetout
post #5  on December 7, 2003 - 9:14 AM PST  
I'll have to check out BLUE COLLAR... I'm a HUGE Beefheart fan.
AKrizman
post #6  on December 7, 2003 - 12:25 PM PST  

> John Carpenter's own score for Dark Star

never saw it. but I loved that psycho-on-speed music he came up with for Halloween. It gives me an anxiety attack every time I hear it.

> Maurice Jarre's score for The Year of Living Dangerously

ditto.

I know it's probably lame to list movies that use pop songs as soundtracks, but I gotta count Hard Days Night and Stop Making Sense.
ShAmPo0
post #7  on December 7, 2003 - 1:04 PM PST  
Any Argento or other horror movie that the Goblins did the sound track on, Claudio Simonetti for Demoni, most of Fabio Frizzi's work on like Fulci films, the Labyrinth soundtrack :P Bowie rules, and the soundtrack to The Wicker Man by Paul Giovanni.

notable mentions ... The violent professionals and cannibal ferox/holocaust soundtracks.
msilenus
post #8  on December 7, 2003 - 3:27 PM PST  
Dark City (Trevor Jones) has to be one of the best Ive encountered. Also Ravenous,Kronos Quartet on Requiem For A Dream and Raiders of the Lost Ark of course ;) . Oh and Blade Runner...how could I leave that out? -MS
msilenus
post #9  on December 7, 2003 - 3:29 PM PST  
Any Argento or other horror movie that the Goblins did the sound track on, Claudio Simonetti for Demoni, most of Fabio Frizzi's work on like Fulci films, the Labyrinth soundtrack :P Bowie rules, and the soundtrack to The Wicker Man by Paul Giovanni.

Gotta love Tenebrae and Phenomena (Simonetti's work)
ShAmPo0
post #10  on December 7, 2003 - 3:40 PM PST  
> On December 7, 2003 - 3:29 PM PST msilenus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Gotta love Tenebrae and Phenomena (Simonetti's work)
> ---------------------------------

Did simonetti do phenomena? i thought it was goblin maybe im mistaken, i know simonetti did the soundtrack for Opera either way its quality :)
Eoliano
post #11  on December 7, 2003 - 4:53 PM PST  
Mishima.

Oh yeah, ditto that, hamano! Glass' wonderful string quartets for Mishima are striking, as is the music for the "book" sequences for Kyoko's Room and Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Easily his best film score.

Bernard Herrmann's scores for Cape Fear, Psycho, Taxi Driver, North by Northwest and Vertigo always knock me out.

Any number of film scores by Ennio Morricone always catch my ear, perhaps none more so than the groundbreaking Leone westerns, but most notably Once Upon a Time in the West. And I have a warm spot for the humorous score to The Sicilian Clan.

Nino Rota left such an amazing legacy that his work is too numerous to mention here, but who can forget his work for Fellini's La Dolce vita, Otto e Mezzo and Amarcord or Visconti's Il Gattopardo or Rocco and His Brothers?

Recently Toru Takamitsu's brilliant jazzy score for Masahiro Shinoda's Pale Flower left me spellbound.

Also outstanding is Masaru Satô's music for Yojimbo, Sanjuro among others.

Certainly Maurice Jarre's score to Lawrence of Arabia deserves honorable mention
hamano
post #12  on December 7, 2003 - 6:43 PM PST  
> On December 7, 2003 - 4:53 PM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Mishima.
> Oh yeah, ditto that, hamano! Glass' wonderful string quartets for Mishima are striking, as is the music for the "book" sequences for Kyoko's Room and Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Easily his best film score.

I love that bombastic "Opening" piece. It's sort of an inversion of Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries... I always wondered if Glass was conscious of that...

I was walking around in the East Village once, and I ran into Glass on a street corner. I said, "Hi Philip!" and he looked at me like he almost recognized me (we'd never met) and he smiled and said, "Hi!" ^_^ The next time I saw him he was sitting behind us with a bag of popcorn the first or second day that David Byrne's True Stories was playing at New York's Sutton Theater (57th & 3rd). I kept looking back to see if there was a reaction to the incidental music, which was sometimes very Glass-esque (or maybe even a spoof of Glass?) but he wasn't right behind us so I couldn't see.

He may also have been at the Japan Society when they hosted a "special" screening of Mishima with an intro by Paul Schrader (I think Schrader was married to a Japanese woman at the time). What I remember about that screening was that Yoko Ono was sitting right in front of us, with little Sean and his baby sitter. It was funny because every time a sexy or violent scene came on, Yoko would say, "Oh" and cover Sean's eyes with her hand. Just a regular mom after all...

> Any number of film scores by Ennio Morricone ...
> Nino Rota left such an amazing legacy ...

See? I told you so...
Ayato
post #13  on December 7, 2003 - 7:05 PM PST  
My current favorite would be the Millenium Actress soundtrack.
hamano
post #14  on December 7, 2003 - 8:05 PM PST  
> On December 6, 2003 - 1:28 PM PST artifex wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> What's your favorite movie soundtrack?
> Let's leave out anime, because there's a separate thread going for anime soundtracks

Hey, Ayato! You anime freaks go back to the Anime forum where you belong! ;-)
larbeck
post #15  on December 7, 2003 - 9:14 PM PST  
> On December 7, 2003 - 8:05 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Hey, Ayato! You anime freaks go back to the Anime forum where you belong! ;-)
>
Hamano, my pot, that sure is a black kettle, isn't it! Okay, I'll be good and besides, I believe I all ready had mentioned the music of Battle Athletess, the various Bubblegum Crisises, serial experiment lain, Neon Genesis Evangelion (have mercy) FLCL, and of course SEEEERRRAAA MMUUUUUUNNNN!!! So, I won't repeat myself here.

But I do have to mention the soundtrack to Easy Rider! And Wendy Carlos is always good, whether it is "A Clockwork Orange" or "Tron". Tangerine Dream never released that great soundtrack from "The Keep", dammit, and it took forever before Vangelis finally released the soundtrack to "Blade Runner". But at least Tangerine Dream did recycle some of their best tunes on the "Risky Business" soundtrack.

I always wish someone would make a film for Pink Floyd's "A Saucer Full of Secrets" but then they did "La Valle" but the Good Music was mostly buried in that ratty mono track - get the CD ("Obscured by Clouds") and THEN see the movie. "Heat" with Pacino and De Nino impressed me so much, I run out right after the movie and bought the CD - i love the Passengers!. And their is "Flashdance". Love "Flashdance".

Everyone knows about the rock'n'roll double album from "Heavy Metal" but did you know that the cinematic orchestra score was released on a separate album by long time movie scorer Elmer Bernstein. And *anything* by John Berry was always worth a listen and most of Jerry Goldsmith's best was good. Google will take to more than you could possibly want to hear.

Today, I watch Brian Joubert skate a flawless Free Skate to music for "The Matrix" but Agent Smiths picked the judging and give it to Evgeni Plushenko, dammit.

And then there is that 1000 pound gorilla of cinema music - the ONLY person that George Lucas does not micromanage, John Williams (YES!).

You might say that I do enjoy movie music a bit.
IronS
post #16  on December 7, 2003 - 10:01 PM PST  
> On December 7, 2003 - 9:14 PM PST larbeck wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> John Williams (YES!).
> ---------------------------------

When I was young, the two movie soundtracks I owned (on vinyl no less) were from Star Wars and the Muppet Movie.
artifex
post #17  on December 7, 2003 - 10:06 PM PST  
> Hamano, my pot, that sure is a black kettle, isn't it! Okay, I'll be good and besides, I believe I all ready had mentioned the music of Battle Athletess, the various Bubblegum Crisises, serial experiment lain, Neon Genesis Evangelion (have mercy) FLCL, and of course SEEEERRRAAA MMUUUUUUNNNN!!! So, I won't repeat myself here.

The other reason why I wanted anime left out is because I've seen so many AMVs with Evangelion clips that I'm no longer sure what the real soundtrack is :)

> But I do have to mention the soundtrack to Easy Rider! And Wendy Carlos is always good, whether it is "A Clockwork Orange" or "Tron". Tangerine Dream never released that great soundtrack from "The Keep", dammit, and it took forever before Vangelis finally released the soundtrack to "Blade Runner". But at least Tangerine Dream did recycle some of their best tunes on the "Risky Business" soundtrack.

Yes, Carlos is great, "Beethoviana" from "A Clockwork Orange" is on my list of things to be played at my funeral. If you put a CD with that track on repeat, it's totally seamless, btw. I used to fall asleep to it in high school! And at last, someone brings up "Blade Runner."

> And then there is that 1000 pound gorilla of cinema music - the ONLY person that George Lucas does not micromanage, John Williams (YES!).

We'd be Jonesing for him if we left him off the list, that's for sure.

One of the best movies with roller skates in a supporting role also featured a pop singer: Olivia Newton-John in Xanadu. We had a midnight showing of this at my local film festival, and people were getting up to dance in the aisles. The only movie I can remember where more people sang along with the theme was The Neverending Story, which deserves a place on the list as well.
IronS
post #18  on December 7, 2003 - 10:46 PM PST  
About danceable music, let's not forget The Full Monty. "You Sexy Thing" by Hot Chocolate - way funkier and sexier than the version by the Tom Tom Club. "You Can Leave Your Hat On" sang by Tom Jones - truly a song to strip to since Tom is much sexier and less creepy than Randy Newman.
hamano
post #19  on December 7, 2003 - 10:48 PM PST  
Forgot to mention the wonderful music on In the Mood for Love. There's nice use of old Cole Porter, old Chinese movie & pop music, trad. Chinese opera music, and a waltz by Shigeru Umegayashi recycled from director Seijun Suzuki's 1991 movie Yumeji (about which very little is known). There's quite a bit of discussion of the music on the DVD extras, fortunately on the main movie disc (disc 1) rather than on the bonus disc. Clever use is made of an original musical theme in a waltz tempo by Michael Galasso, which is like a variation of the Yumeji waltz in a minor key. A great movie, which I'm lucky to own.

Also, a guilty pleasure, the only good use of music by ABBA, Muriel's Wedding!
Eoliano
post #20  on December 8, 2003 - 6:53 AM PST  
> > Any number of film scores by Ennio Morricone ...
> > Nino Rota left such an amazing legacy ...
>
> See? I told you so...

[???]

page  1  2  3  4      prev | next

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.