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74

Weepies Primer
Topic by: AKrizman
Posted: March 15, 2004 - 3:29 PM PST
Last Reply: March 20, 2004 - 10:55 AM PST

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author topic: Weepies Primer
AKrizman
post #1  on March 15, 2004 - 3:29 PM PST  
When I read about The Champ in the Weepies primer, I remembered the first time I saw it. I was 9; the exact same age as the little kid in the movie (it turns out me and Ricky Schroder share the same birthday - date and year!), and I bawled my eyes out.

It was the first time I *ever* cried in a movie.

Which begs the question:

What was the first movie you ever cried at?
hamano
post #2  on March 15, 2004 - 3:58 PM PST  
For me crying at movies is something that developed with age... As a younger man maybe I was more blase or indifferent. I might have cried at a scary monster when I was a little kid or something, but I somehow doubt it.

So I'd have to say it was at the end of the Joy Luck Club...
dwhudson
post #3  on March 16, 2004 - 2:41 AM PST  
Many thanks for opening this topic, AKrizman. As for the very first time I cried at a movie, I honestly can't remember. My trail of tears really does go back that far!

But I can certainly remember one of the times the tears gushed most, and that was the climactic scene of Dead Man Walking. Later, I realized that part of it - besides, of course, all the obvious triggers: great screenplay, excellent performances, an issue that really does matter, all that - was that Tim Robbins had used music so minimally up to that point; and even when he does bring it in, it doesn't overwhelm that actual long walk.

And there are others... but now you've got me wondering what the first might have been. Hope I can remember...
Eoliano
post #4  on March 16, 2004 - 6:11 AM PST  
The first time I wept in the theater was in 1956 at the end of La Strada, when Zampano is on the beach crying uncontrollably, and I suddenly realized that Gelsomina was dead.
hamano
post #5  on March 16, 2004 - 6:52 AM PST  
Oh, yeah, that WAS a good one! Gelsominaaaa!
AKrizman
post #6  on March 16, 2004 - 11:01 AM PST  
For me crying at movies is something that developed with age... As a younger man maybe I was more blase or indifferent. I might have cried at a scary monster when I was a little kid or something, but I somehow doubt it.

I was more of a sucker when I was a kid. I'd cry at all the obvious places, like When Bambi's mom gets shot or during Old Yeller.

I got more cynical as I got older. If the sad scene was too predictable or manipulative, it wouldn't effect me. Now I only cry when I'm caught off guard. For instance, I didn't cry at Steel Magnolias, but I *did* cry during Parenthood.
hamano
post #7  on March 16, 2004 - 11:03 AM PST  
Parenthood? How did Parenthood catch you off guard?
sinisterguffaw
post #8  on March 16, 2004 - 11:14 AM PST  
My first one was E.T. When those damned moon men invade the house! After a frightful weeping, I subsequently fell asleep. Hey, I was only 3 years old!
dh22
post #9  on March 16, 2004 - 11:33 AM PST  
I basically cry a little (but dont tell anyone) when Dumbo gets back with his mom, at the end of Color Purple, when Hooch dies in Turner & Hooch. The first time I remember is when watching this movie (can't remember the name) where some kid hangs from a tree (monkeybars style, not noose style) and bounces himself up and down. He uses the number of creeks to tell him his weight. Anyway, one day the branch breaks and he falls down the side of this cliff. I don't think he died but I remember crying cause I thought he would die. This is when I remember my mother telling me the difference between the real world and the tv world.


..I recant. I don't cry. I maybe get a little water in the eye, but that's it.
SonjaBlue
post #10  on March 16, 2004 - 11:59 AM PST  
As dwhudson mentioned, it is difficult to recall the very first time...I think it's all about certain scenes and the soundtracks associated with them.

Typically, though, there does seem to be more a pattern associated with scenes of death or loss. Examples: "Death of Lois" (SUPERMAN), an ending sequence in (Jack Weyland's) CHARLY, and the last scene of NIKITA ("We Will Miss Her [Instrumental]" courtesy of French composer Eric Serra).

Do you think it's kind of morbid that we consider some things that obviously make us feel bad as being good?
sinisterguffaw
post #11  on March 16, 2004 - 12:09 PM PST  
I don't think there's anything morbid about catharcism. I think it's quite healthy!

Maybe the word is cathardity. Or catharlionic. or cathardonic. or catheder. no. no not catheder.

dh22
post #12  on March 16, 2004 - 12:11 PM PST  
> On March 16, 2004 - 11:59 AM PST SonjaBlue wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Do you think it's kind of morbid that we consider some things that obviously make us feel bad as being good?
> ---------------------------------

I think we rejoice in the realization that the horror we've experienced is not real. We go to great emotional ends, but then are pulled back to reality. The farther the film maker pushed us, the better we feel the job has been done.
underdog
post #13  on March 16, 2004 - 12:13 PM PST  
There may be "no crying in baseball" but... crying is good for you!

Two of my first theater weeping experiences have already been mentioned here -- Dumbo, and ET. My God, I blubbered in the latter. I seem to recall, vaguely, crying in Walkabout, which my dad took us to see when I was wee (too) small, buut I think I was a little more afraid than sad. And animal movies made me cry, too -- especially when something bad happened to one of them. I often felt more empathetic for animals than people for some reason. Come to think of it, I still sometimes feel that way.

Oh, and I cried a few times in Kramer vs. Kramer, I think in part because I had gone through a similar divorce scenario at about the same time. It really does help the tears flow if you connect to something in the film, even if it's primal or subconsciously...

As an adult, I remember crying in Longtime Companion, during Bruce Davison's heartbreaking "let go" scene.

dh22
post #14  on March 16, 2004 - 12:13 PM PST  
> On March 16, 2004 - 12:09 PM PST sinisterguffaw wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I don't think there's anything morbid about catharcism. I think it's quite healthy!
>
> Maybe the word is cathardity. Or catharlionic. or cathardonic. or catheder. no. no not catheder.
>
>
> ---------------------------------

Yes, good point. Well, except for that little rant. It IS cathardic, but without the hang-over of a true crisis in our real life. Its like a screaming excersize.
SonjaBlue
post #15  on March 16, 2004 - 12:18 PM PST  
sinistergaffaw, you mean, "catharsis?" I agree with your point...But, another example of a cathartic agent is a laxative. (<-- all the "gain" and no "pain.")
dh22
post #16  on March 16, 2004 - 12:21 PM PST  
Someone just reminded me of another one. The end of Mask with Cher, and Eric Stoltz.
SonjaBlue
post #17  on March 16, 2004 - 12:30 PM PST  
Yes, good point. Well, except for that little rant. It IS cathardic, but without the hang-over of a true crisis in our real life. Its like a screaming excersize.
> ---------------------------------

dh22, that's an excellent way to put it!

AKrizman
post #18  on March 16, 2004 - 12:41 PM PST  
> On March 16, 2004 - 11:03 AM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
Parenthood? How did Parenthood catch you off guard?
-------------------------------------

Precisely.

You wouldn't think a movie like Parenthood would make you cry; it's a comedy. I've seen the movie a half dozen times or so, and I cry *every* time. I cry every time Leaf Phoenix calls his dad to ask if he could stay with him. I cry when Diane Weiss tells Martha Plimpton to not come back if she leaves, but then runs off chasing her down the street when she does. I cry when "that Todd" has his "that's what little dudes do" talk with Leaf Phoenix. I cry when the awkward kid has to catch the fly ball in the little league game. I cry when Jason Robards makes his final offer to Tom Hulce. I cry when Steve Martin finally 'gets' grandmas Roller Coaster analogy. I could probably think of a couple more examples if I think about it.

Maybe it's because I come from a large tight family, and some of the stuff in the movie is very close to home. Particularly, the Diane Weiss and Martha Plimpton relationship resembles my mom and my oldest sisters relationship pretty closely.

rmarkd
post #19  on March 16, 2004 - 2:03 PM PST  
> On March 15, 2004 - 3:29 PM PST AKrizman wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> What was the first movie you ever cried at?
> ---------------------------------

Believe it or not, Star Trek II: Wrath of Kahn
Hey, I was young.

The one movie I'll always cry in is Dumbo. That scene between him and his caged mom... damn, I'm tearing up just thinking about it.

-Mark


Brockton
post #20  on March 16, 2004 - 2:31 PM PST  
I'll have to qualify this as the first time I remember crying. Sometime back in the seventies, I watched a movie with my mom called Sunshine, a story about a woman dying of cancer (complete with a John Denver soundtrack). My research tells me that it was a made-for-TV weeper.

Hey AKrizman, if we wear out this topic, there's always the last time you cried at movie...
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