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A place for you to post comments on our articles.
74

UGNA!
Topic by: dpowers
Posted: February 4, 2003 - 3:39 PM PST
Last Reply: May 17, 2003 - 11:27 AM PDT

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author topic: UGNA!
dpowers
post #1  on February 4, 2003 - 3:39 PM PST  
this is an Unofficial GreenCine News Archive (UGNA) until an archive is set up for real.
dpowers
post #2  on February 4, 2003 - 3:40 PM PST  
Ahksentz. February 4, 2003 - 4:37 AM PST
posted by dwhudson

Bill Berkowitz in Alternet on right-wing talkmeister Bill O'Reilly's weird obsession with George Clooney.

Brendan I. Koerner argues in Slate that recordable DVDs are headed the way of the floppy disk. And Sue Lowe of the Sydney Morning Herald reports on that dreaded DVD rot. Via Weblogsky.

Online listening tip: Once you click this, you'll find yourself listening to a This American Life program. Unless you're terribly interested in the first segment, scoot your dial 30 minutes in to hear a wonderful piece by Mark Shone. It wasn't until he'd moved from his all-but-native South to NYC that Shone understood why major movies that got everything else so right screwed up so terribly when it came to southern accents. "The South was a movie, a cartoon" to everyone outside it, he realized, with all variations on its multitude of accents invented by a British actress, Vivien Leigh. Listen to Shone's incisive critiques of the fake dialects of Keanu Reeves in Devil's Advocate ("Well, maybe that's too easy"), Dan Ackroyd in Driving Miss Daisy, Robert De Niro in Cape Fear ("The worst thing I'd ever heard") and the entire cast of Steel Magnolias.
dwhudson
post #3  on February 5, 2003 - 12:42 AM PST  
Many, many thanks, David. I've been meaning to get around to this, actually. I'll try to sweep by with earlier 'editions' of the news -- and I hope a few will spark a conversation or two as well.
dpowers
post #4  on February 5, 2003 - 3:38 AM PST  
> It wasn't until [Mark Shone]'d moved from his all-but-native South to NYC that Shone understood why major movies that got everything else so right screwed up so terribly when it came to southern accents. <

okay essay on the (white) voices. wish he'd given some good examples - he got his rant out by ignoring sissy spacek, billy bob thornton, &c. (i thought the whites in a family thing sounded like a lot of my southern family.)

on the movies... could drive a herd of cattle through that blind spot, boy. we're talking about driving miss daisy and steel magnolias here, and all he picks as socially out of whack are the accents. uh HUH.

oops okay maybe this thread isn't so great for discussion...?
dpowers
post #5  on February 5, 2003 - 10:32 AM PST  

Chirac vs Valenti
posted February 5, 2003 - 1:22 AM PST by dwhudson

American movies represent 85 percent of the global market. The US has what Alan Riding calls in the New York Times an "audiovisual trade surplus" of $8.1 billion with the EU alone. 35 countries, led by France and Canada, are calling for a measure to make culture an exception to the WTO's free-trade-über-alles severity. "With the opening of a round of international trade negotiations," said French president Jacques Chirac, "the champions of unlimited trade liberalization are once again lining up against those who believe that creative works cannot be reduced to the rank of ordinary merchandise." The MPAA's Jack Valenti: "I think it's fair to say we'd oppose it."

"I have fallen in love with another Powell and Pressburger film," blogs Allyn at Milk Plus. The film is The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp and the blog is a fun, sometimes light, sometimes not-so-light thought-provoker.

"Awards Season's flu-like symptoms are pandemic. They can be felt year-round in the constant conflation of hype, arrogance and rush-to-judgment that has replaced contemplation and evaluation regarding movies." Armond White lets off a bit o'steam at the New York Press.

In the Voice, Paul LaFarge reviews Rebecca Solnit's River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West: "Photography was not a new invention in the 1870s; neither were racehorses. But the record, on film, of a moving animal, was something the world had never seen before... it changed everything."

Today's online viewing tip comes from Steve Rhodes: The Media That Matters Film Festival is co-sponsored by Free Speech TV and the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival, which, by the way, is something you can catch IRL in Berkeley at Pacific Film Archive starting this Friday and then in San Francisco at Yuerba Buena starting on the 14th.

dwhudson
post #6  on February 5, 2003 - 11:10 AM PST  

> on the movies... could drive a herd of cattle through that blind spot, boy. we're talking about driving miss daisy and steel magnolias here, and all he picks as socially out of whack are the accents. uh HUH.
>
> oops okay maybe this thread isn't so great for discussion...?

No, this thread is great for discussion. So, first, a question: Not sure I've understood you. Sissy Spacek and BB Thornton's accents are off? I don't think that's what you're saying... but...?

Anyway, I thought it was a fun piece to listen to. And as a native Texan, I don't agree with everything he said, either. Like he said, there are many accents -- IIRC, there are 16 distinct Texas dialects (that's not a number I've pulled out of my hat; I actually read that somewhere, some when) -- and he can't know there's someone in Abilene or Alpine or Corpus Christi who doesn't say "Lahf is lahk..."

Another thing: My mother, born and raised in the Lone Star State, used to get a kick out of Foghorn Leghorn precisely because he was so authentic. We had relatives (heard 'em myself) who'd say, "It's gettin', I say, it's gettin' awful crowded 'round here."

So there you go. Still: fun.
dpowers
post #7  on February 5, 2003 - 12:21 PM PST  
> Not sure I've understood you. Sissy Spacek and BB Thornton's accents are off? <

no, they're examples of goodness and light, and both have tried to avoid that strange alternate movie reality where slavery was "misunderstood" and gone with the wind and the birth of the nation were documentaries.

shore ignored them, and any other real attempts at treating the south as just another place where people live, in order to get his point across. it felt like the real itch he wanted to scratch was his own feeling of rootlessness, not the falsity of new york's impression of the south.

i don't want to call the pursuit of julia roberts's real accent a witch hunt. but when he went after her, playfully crucifying her for giving up her natural talking twang, i felt like he was trying to unmask her to deflect attention from himself.

hmm. has NYC changed that much that somebody would go there and be shocked, shocked to find that new yorkers are smug?

EXTRA! SOUTHERNERS, NORTHERNERS AGREE: NYC FULL OF ITSELF! surprise runner up: san francisco.

> Anyway, I thought it was a fun piece to listen to. <

yeah. a little tweaking and it could be dialogue on a bass boat.
Eoliano
post #8  on February 5, 2003 - 1:43 PM PST  
>> I say, it's gettin' awful crowded 'round here.

Yeah, well, I wish it wuz moah crowded in heah.
Eoliano
post #9  on February 5, 2003 - 1:50 PM PST  
The South, as referred to in that piece, is a vast one and generalities abound.

Rounding up all of the dialects (perhaps a more appropriate word than accents) of the South would be a considerable job, even for an American Henry Higgins.
Eoliano
post #10  on February 5, 2003 - 1:53 PM PST  
>> has NYC changed that much that somebody would go there and be shocked, shocked to find that new yorkers are smug?

Yeah, well, ya'autta take a look in da mirrah.

dpowers
post #11  on February 5, 2003 - 8:06 PM PST  
dwhudson wrote:
> IIRC, there are 16 distinct Texas dialects <

well that's more than i would have thought but counting cajuns, the different black populations, the different spanish-bilingual populations, 16 sounds okay. or was it just white-european?

eoliano wrote:
> Yeah, well, ya'autta take a look in da mirrah. <

they call me vain but i don't know why
because my eyes are pretty as the sky?
because my body makes the ladies sigh?
because the world's gonna stop on the day i die?
if i think, i'll get a wrinkle --
can you see my smile twinkle?
because i see it in the mirror, in the corner of my eye.

dwhudson
post #12  on February 6, 2003 - 1:27 AM PST  

> well that's more than i would have thought but counting cajuns, the different black populations, the different spanish-bilingual populations, 16 sounds okay. or was it just white-european?

Good question. I afraid I just don't know. And unfortunately, I can't even remember where I read this. So it's probably the sort of factoid I shouldn't go slinging around... but I just love it, and I'll probably go on dropping into conversation. Silly me.
dpowers
post #13  on February 6, 2003 - 9:41 AM PST  
----

Where's the nugget?
posted February 6, 2003 - 2:14 AM PST by dwhudson

[paris texas image] A look back at Paris, Texas, "amongst other things an extremely intelligent essay on love and jealousy of which Kieslowski or Antonioni could be proud," and a review of The Cinema of Wim Wenders in Kamera.co.uk.

"He bought a Rolls-Royce that he used as an ashtray because he didn't have a driving licence, and it amused him to say that he got the money for it from Tito's communist government after making a film in Yugoslavia. He went all over Switzerland to find the best lobby for his nugget of gold, and then he lost the address of the bank. I have no idea where his nugget is now." Jane Birkin remembers Serge Gainsbourg in the Guardian.

Film critics have been taking quite a few punches lately. Patrick Goldstein sums up the recent round of critic-bashing in the LA Times.

In the SF Bay Guardian, reflections this week on America and Americans on screen: Johnny Ray Huston on two docs showing at the SF IndieFest and Susan Gerhard on The Quiet American.

Derek Slater interviews MPAA Prez Jack Valenti for the Harvard Political Review and then comments on the whole affair on his blog: "The MPAA throws millions of dollars at Congress each year. Apparently, Valenti considers that a tragedy."

Online toy: Imagination at work.

----
dpowers
post #14  on February 6, 2003 - 10:09 AM PST  
okay. some process notes on the UGNA.

red: i guess me posting them makes sense, fewer cooks & takes less than five minutes per article. but no disaster if there's a double post, so if you can't stand waiting for the archive to catch up with reality, you just go ahead and follow that bliss. all i do is copy and paste the HTML source of the article from the main page, taking out stray {p}, {br}, and {table}-related codes.

white: haven't figured out a good "this is an article" marker yet. maybe "----" works. but can't use color like the main page, the board software pulls that out. ideas welcome.

blue: if i know i won't be around i'll send a note to DWH, i guess? to make sure no articles are missed.

how's that sound. la la!
dwhudson
post #15  on February 6, 2003 - 1:28 PM PST  
David, first, again, many thanks for this. Actually, I could make this a lot easier for you by simply posting yesterday's news myself as I put up today's. I just tap this stuff out in Simple Text and then cut-n-paste the thing into a box because not only are the GC tech crew wizards, they know I'm not. [g]

I've also been stringing together earlier news posts and as soon as I get the chance, will start archiving them here, about a week's worth at a time. Just gotta catch my breath first, but those oldies are coming soon.
dwhudson
post #16  on February 6, 2003 - 1:41 PM PST  
Btw, starting tomorrow and through the rest of the Berlinale (i.e., through the 16th), news and Daily 5s will be appearing much later each day, though still not too terribly late in the day in the US.
dpowers
post #17  on February 6, 2003 - 2:44 PM PST  
> Actually, I could make this a lot easier for you by simply posting yesterday's news myself as I put up today's. <

okay then, i'll one up you. i could make that a lot easier for you by suggesting that you just post the new article to both your regular magic box and the UGNA thread. one cut, two pastes. zip! oh wait that magic box is doing other stuff to the text isn't it.

your honor, i believe posting a new story to both places will not undermine the currency of the front page news, and other useful information therein, because after a period of weeks, getting to the latest in the U-G-N-A thread will be mildly u-g-l-y. i submit "guess that movie # 3" as exhibit A.

> I've also been stringing together earlier news posts <

i for one appreciate that and thank you but the berlinale is more important. ^_^
dwhudson
post #18  on February 6, 2003 - 4:07 PM PST  

> i believe posting a new story to both places will not undermine the currency of the front page news...

You are, of course, once again, dead-on right. I will do that, starting tomorrow.

> but the berlinale is more important. ^_^

There are, as of a moment ago, two new pages! TBA in tomorrow's news, but for those who read these threads, you've got a jump on everyone else!
dpowers
post #19  on February 6, 2003 - 8:14 PM PST  
> Film critics have been taking quite a few punches lately. critic-bashing <

david thomson's been trotted out over and over. he doesn't know the real answer but in what i've ready lately nobody else who has film-world credibility is any closer. i think that's why people are using that "my teen son is the secret" story. but since I KNOW THE ANSWER i will pass it on.

the answer is: the new movies are video games. the movie makers get it, they know that they can't supply "better TV" very effectively in this day and age, but they can beat the crap out of video game graphics, sweep, story, and smoothness.

for instance, comic books, even graphic novels, lead straight to video games, not TV, not even to animation, because though cartoons are popular, what a person wants from a comic book is not to watch, but to BE - the video game version is better than halloween costumes.

is there serious criticism of video games as an artistic experience? i can't imagine it, for obvious reasons, but maybe somebody knows somebody nuts who's trying it?

but i think, looking right past the smirking industry whores, it will be out of the gamer community that the next generation of film critics comes, people who examine movies drawing inspiration from video games, as their far predecessors drew inspiration from books.

people who don't read don't rule. this is a time-tested truth. i would say that old-style film critics, working from books, are necessary not for the movies, but to keep people going to libraries.
dpowers
post #20  on February 6, 2003 - 8:28 PM PST  
going to libraries, and reading (into) the newspaper.

yes i think that a gap between "serious" critics and what's selling tickets is a reading literacy gap. this isn't a reflection on people not liking the very artsy films, if there's a case for people in general having lower reading levels now than 40 years ago i won't make it. i'm concentrating on the gist of the article above, that film critics are out of touch. they're not: popular immersion-style movies are less literate, less provocative, less demanding, and it's pissing off the smart critics.

i think
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