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GreenCine Movie Talk
Anime
Discuss all topics related to anime.
561

Anime Vs. Animation
Topic by: Christine
Posted: May 30, 2005 - 11:15 PM PDT
Last Reply: June 29, 2005 - 10:59 PM PDT

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author topic: Anime Vs. Animation
Christine
post #1  on May 30, 2005 - 11:15 PM PDT  
Hi all!! I'm new here! :)

What is the difference between Anime and Animation? And how is Anime pronounced?

~ Thanks

Christine
Catullus
post #2  on May 31, 2005 - 3:45 AM PDT  
Animation is any drawn/rendered motion/movement, its a very broad term in the defintion you are looking for

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=animation&x=0&y=0


As for anime that is saying animation, but from japan, or japanese style.

So basically japanese cartoons but dont you dare let me catch you calling them cartoons or ill froth at the mouth and make gurgling noises in red faced anger and good stuff like that.

I pronounce it ani-may

^_^
woozy
post #3  on May 31, 2005 - 10:04 AM PDT  
As someone who is, regrettably, not an anime enthusist, when I think "animation" I think of "101 Dalmations" and when I think of "anime" I think of "Akira"[1] (which I haven't seen, for the record).

As an anal-retentive precisionist, such broad definitions annoy me as, technically, there is no difference between the films (both animated renderings of drawn illustrations) except for the seemingly superficial "one's made in Japan-- the other's American" and a bunch of non-definitive generalizations of: one's for kids, the other's rated R; one follows the tradition of children story telling of anthropamorphised animals, the other follows a tradition of grim sci-fi japanese "comic books"; and other not very relevant and not exclusive generalities.

The upshot seems to be that in Japan animation is/was much more mainstream than it seems to be elsewhere so there is a very large (and very varied) body of work called "anime", whereas outside japan (or japan-style anime inspired productions) animation is mostly considered kiddy, surreal, or cheap, with a few arty and a few rare exceptions. And like all television or movie styles or cultures, anime has its enthusists.

I've always heard anime pronounce "Anne i may" with a short "i" and first syllable stressed.

[1] This is, of course, a complete over generalization. Just as you can't some up a body of work with a single movie, you can't generalize anime as being "like" this... In general, "animation" as a category heading, has diferent cognotations (in particular "cartoons") than the extraordinarly broad body of "anime" has. On these boards are many lists and discussions of anime and many friendly enthusists to help you find your way around. Good luck.

> On May 30, 2005 - 11:15 PM PDT Christine wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Hi all!! I'm new here! :)
>
> What is the difference between Anime and Animation? And how is Anime pronounced?
>
> ~ Thanks
>
> Christine
> ---------------------------------

ChiyoDad
post #4  on May 31, 2005 - 10:22 AM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 10:04 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I've always heard anime pronounce "Anne i may" with a short "i" and first syllable stressed.
> ---------------------------------

It's closer to "Annie Mae" which is similar to Fannie Mae.

Phonetically, it should be close to: A-nee-mehy. See this link for an audio sample and definition.
woozy
post #5  on May 31, 2005 - 11:02 AM PDT  
> It's closer to "Annie Mae" which is similar to Fannie Mae.

Long "e"? Actually on further thought (and as your link shows) what I described as a short "i" (as in "hit" or "fish") I pronounce more as a "schwah" (the upside down "e") and an "ah" or "uh". Ann uh may.

On the other hand. Technically the "i" in "fish" and in "big" are the same short "i" but to me they are ever so slightly different.

In any case, stress the first syllable as "an" (or "anne" or "ann" or "ant" without the t), then exhale a vowell somewhere in the range between an "uh" and an "ee" but closer to a short i, (which ever seems most natural to you). And end with with "may". As is typical of american pronounciation the primary stress is the first syllable and secondary on the last. DAH-di-dAh. ANN-(i/e/ah/uh)-mAy.
Eoliano
post #6  on May 31, 2005 - 11:31 AM PDT  
> Long "e"?

What's so difficult about pronouncing such a simple word as anime? Pronunciation of Japanese vowels is similar to the pronunciation of Italian or Spanish vowels... but even that may be too much to expect from most Yankee gaijin. ^_^
NLee
post #7  on May 31, 2005 - 12:09 PM PDT  
Anime is a specail form of animation, of course. But what makes anime so different from animation in general?

- Little girls with mellon-sized boobs (but we are told that they are at least 19 years old)
- Eyes that fill half of the face
- Tiny mouth with no lips
- Pointy nose with no naris
- High school girls wearing uniforms with super-short skirts
- Panty shots
- Nose bleed
- Single giant sweat drop over the head
- Rainbow-colored hairs that defies gravity
- Boobs that defies gravity (jiggle and bounce in all directions)
- 500lb Baka hammer
...
Battie
post #8  on May 31, 2005 - 12:14 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 10:04 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
the other follows a tradition of grim sci-fi japanese "comic books"; and other not very relevant and not exclusive generalities.
> ---------------------------------

*gasp* MANGA! You evil man! >_>

The difference is really in style. Traditional American animation, from what I've seen, has roots in Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny, and some with comic strips. There's a pretty marked difference in the style of American animation and Japanese animation.

Plus...a lot of anime targets older audiences, rather than younger. Not all...obviously Japanese have kids, too...but a lot.
Battie
post #9  on May 31, 2005 - 12:16 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 12:09 PM PDT NLee wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Anime is a specail form of animation, of course. But what makes anime so different from animation in general?
>
> - Little girls with mellon-sized boobs (but we are told that they are at least 19 years old)
> - Eyes that fill half of the face
> - Tiny mouth with no lips
> - Pointy nose with no naris
> - High school girls wearing uniforms with super-short skirts
> - Panty shots
> - Nose bleed
> - Single giant sweat drop over the head
> - Rainbow-colored hairs that defies gravity
> - Boobs that defies gravity (jiggle and bounce in all directions)
> - 500lb Baka hammer
> ...
>
> ---------------------------------

....Your forgot the monsters. Our monsters would lose hands down to Japanese monsters.
woozy
post #10  on May 31, 2005 - 12:31 PM PDT  
> What's so difficult about pronouncing such a simple word as anime? Pronunciation of Japanese vowels is similar to the pronunciation of Italian or Spanish vowels... but even that may be too much to expect from most Yankee gaijin. ^_^
> ---------------------------------

It's not difficult. Christine asked how. Assuming she's only read the word, that's a legitimate question (a-NEEM?). Chiyo-Dad and I are going on tangents in that I've always heard it as ANN-uh-mAy or ANN-i-mAy and ChiyoDad is saying it's more like ANN-ee-mAy (in Amurican I assumed) which isn't really that different or at least not enough to throw anyone off. In japanese I don't know how it's pronounced but I'd assume, unless it's a different word, it's similar but with different accentuation (all equally stressed?)

Actually, I'm now wondering if ChiyoDad was describing it with Japanese inflection. I was simply giving the American intonation, dag-nab-it. But anyhow we are probably going into personal specifics and preferences far beyond anything christine (christine? what a weird name! What ever happened to more conventional names like woozy, bowwow, sinisterguffaw, IronS, Shaky, jross, and eno619?) wanted to know.

Anyhow: It's three syllables, not two. Final "e" voiced as a long "ay"



*(So not a-nime) the final e is voiced as a long "ay" (so animay). The i is "short" so *not* the long "eye". And the "a" is the short a that Germans have such a hard time with; a as in Big Mac (so not ay-nee-may, ay-nigh-mee, enemy, a-nime, aynighm, ...)*

woozy
post #11  on May 31, 2005 - 1:05 PM PDT  
> the other follows a tradition of grim sci-fi japanese "comic books"; and other not very relevant and not exclusive generalities.
> > ---------------------------------
>
> *gasp* MANGA! You evil man! >_>

If she doesn't know what ANIME is, she won't know what MANGA is.
>
> The difference is really in style. Traditional American animation, from what I've seen, has roots in Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny, and some with comic strips.

Right. "Kid's stuff" and some arty experimental exceptions.

My point was that "anime" as a group is geared for a different viewing and expectation than "animation" as a group. "anime" has some definite characteristics. ChiyoDad's link says anime is "characterized by stylized colorful art, futuristic settings, violence, and sex" which is not off the mark. "Animation" has definite characteristics as well. However in defining anime somehow different from animation, any such characteristics are too specific. ("stylized colorful art" is too general to mean anything. "futuristic settings, violence, and sex" is not required and doesn't exist gazillions of anime titles. It's just that "futuristic settings, violence, and sex" is specifically what Americans *don't* expect to find in "cartoons".)

>> There's a pretty marked difference in the style of American animation and Japanese animation.

But that's hard to define (unless you go with the "big eyes" :-) [a joke, I swear, its just a joke])

I think the way to define it as a whole to a person who has never seen "anime", would be to say "it's animation but from a culture where animation is mainstream and not assumed to be for children, cheap, or 'cartoons'". One might want to mention that as the main body of anime, by definition, is from Japan it tends to have a very Japanese mentality but that'd probably only add to the confusion. Then, if the person wants to know more specifics, themes and genres, go into specifics.

>
> Plus...a lot of anime targets older audiences, rather than younger. Not all...obviously Japanese have kids, too...but a lot.
> ---------------------------------

Right. In general, "movies" and "television" are for all audiences and most are targetted for "older" audiences. But "animation" has the "kid" connotation (which is kind of weird if you think about it-- we "know" what "animation" is so we expect kiddy cartoons/arty experimental stuff like "waking life" which are totally different but we get thrown by "anime" because it's neither for kids no arty experimental stuff; in a way it's the "animation" category that is weird.)
Eoliano
post #12  on May 31, 2005 - 1:32 PM PDT  
> *(So not a-nime)*

It's more like ah-nee-meh...
NLee
post #13  on May 31, 2005 - 1:46 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 12:16 PM PDT Battie wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> ....Your forgot the monsters. Our monsters would lose hands down to Japanese monsters.
> ---------------------------------

Uh, to lose hands down is very easy. To win hands down is more impressive.

Okay, to add a few more items:

- Giant robots that fight like human (with swords, for example) and bleed like human
- Magical girl transofmations
- Tentacle beasts... Strike that. We don't want to corrupt Chistine, yet.
Eoliano
post #14  on May 31, 2005 - 2:07 PM PDT  
> - Tentacle beasts... Strike that. We don't want to corrupt Chistine, yet.

I was going to leave it for you-know-who to post a link when he returns but what the hell... ^=^
ChiyoDad
post #15  on May 31, 2005 - 2:13 PM PDT  
I suppose, technically, anime and manga are any animation an comics that come from Japan.

The cultural definition has broadened lately to incorporate any animation or comic that adopts the style of these Japanese creations. Take, for example, the latest version of a good old US mainstay like Sabrina, The Teenage Witch. (I learned about this when Chiyo-chan got a copy at a newsstand.)
markhl
post #16  on May 31, 2005 - 2:14 PM PDT  
Since Hamano is on a break, I'll point out the Maigochan's Anime Primer in his place for Christine. It's a nice place to start and won't corrupt your mind like NLee's teachings :)

NLee, you forgot gravity-defying hairstyles. It ain't just the boobs. heh.
ahogue
post #17  on May 31, 2005 - 2:52 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 2:13 PM PDT ChiyoDad wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I suppose, technically, anime and manga are any animation an comics that come from Japan.

> ---------------------------------

According to what I've read, in Japan "manga" does just mean comics in general, not specifically Japanese. But of course that's not how it's used in English. I wonder if the same is true of "anime"?
Battie
post #18  on May 31, 2005 - 3:27 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 1:05 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> If she doesn't know what ANIME is, she won't know what MANGA is.
> >

It's not comic books. *puts on big, superior sneer*

> Right. "Kid's stuff" and some arty experimental exceptions.
>

I meant the style of the animation, not the content.

> ---------------------------------

Battie
post #19  on May 31, 2005 - 3:30 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 2:13 PM PDT ChiyoDad wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I suppose, technically, anime and manga are any animation and comics that come from Japan.
>
> The cultural definition has broadened lately to incorporate any animation or comic that adopts the style of these Japanese creations. Take, for example, the latest version of a good old US mainstay like Sabrina, The Teenage Witch. (I learned about this when Chiyo-chan got a copy at a newsstand.)
> ---------------------------------

NAY! I'd include Teen Titans on an off day...but I can't think of any American animation that actually resembles Japanese anime very much. Well..Spawn (the animated series), to an extent.
Battie
post #20  on May 31, 2005 - 3:33 PM PDT  
> On May 31, 2005 - 3:30 PM PDT Battie wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On May 31, 2005 - 2:13 PM PDT ChiyoDad wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > I suppose, technically, anime and manga are any animation and comics that come from Japan.
> >
> > The cultural definition has broadened lately to incorporate any animation or comic that adopts the style of these Japanese creations. Take, for example, the latest version of a good old US mainstay like Sabrina, The Teenage Witch. (I learned about this when Chiyo-chan got a copy at a newsstand.)
> > ---------------------------------
>
> NAY! I'd include Teen Titans on an off day...but I can't think of any American animation that actually resembles Japanese anime very much. Well..Spawn (the animated series), to an extent.
> ---------------------------------

I forgot to add...some of the animation that you're thinking of doesn't necessarily have a strong influence from Japan. I remember those horrid Barbie animated movies from the early 90s.....
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