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GreenCine Movie Talk
Cult
Those films with a following all their own.
83

Lupis? Attack of the Giant Rabbits
Topic by: CodyPendent
Posted: August 24, 2004 - 2:31 PM PDT
Last Reply: August 27, 2004 - 8:44 PM PDT

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author topic: Lupis? Attack of the Giant Rabbits
CodyPendent
post #1  on August 24, 2004 - 2:31 PM PDT  
Ok ramblers. Since y'all have been so good so far (thanks woozy). I'm looking for the name of a film about giant rabbits. I thought it was lupis or lupin.any ideas?
IronS
post #2  on August 24, 2004 - 2:52 PM PDT  
Lepus. Night of the Lepus.
Cinenaut
post #3  on August 24, 2004 - 2:53 PM PDT  
We should have a contest for the most harmless monster movie monster, except Night of the Lepus would win.
underdog
post #4  on August 24, 2004 - 3:44 PM PDT  
> On August 24, 2004 - 2:53 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> We should have a contest for the most harmless monster movie monster, except Night of the Lepus would win.
> ---------------------------------

Definitely NIGHT OF THE LEPUS in a landslide. That movie was ridiculous. I remember it for the way they tried to make the bunnies look menacing, but didn't have the budget to create mutant rabbits so they just filmed real rabbits from low angles to make them look big. Added thunderous sound FX. Whatever they could do. But they still looked like cute little bunnies.

Add to that DeForrest Kelley and you've got a classic.

Did Mystery Science Theater ever do that one? Would've been perfect fodder.


Eh, what's up doc?

woozy
post #5  on August 24, 2004 - 6:19 PM PDT  
> On August 24, 2004 - 2:53 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> We should have a contest for the most harmless monster movie monster, except Night of the Lepus would win.
> ---------------------------------

Well, I remember channel hopping one day when I was home from college and I came across the original "Willard" and watched as cute loner Willard trains cute little adorable rats. I had pet rats as a child as did my sisters as did my mother so we all watched it without knowing what it was. I figured it couldn't be Willard as I had heard Willard was a horror movie. When WIllard sends his rats in to invade a party and people scream my mother wondered "Why are they showing this? Why don't they go to back to the cute training and playing with rats?" Finally at the end, my mother who hates anything even remotely like horror, said "Wait a minute, were the rats supposed to be the bad guys? Were they supposed to be scary?"

If you don't have the phobia... well... This, however, seems just absurd... 'course there was "Frogs" and "Worms" and, oh for god sake, that stupid movie about bats a few years ago. Now if ever there was a harmless animal, it was the bat.

SonjaBlue
post #6  on August 24, 2004 - 9:10 PM PDT  
woozy wrote:

>...Now if ever there was a harmless animal, it was the bat.<

Not if you were to disturb the cave...


SonjaBlue
post #7  on August 24, 2004 - 9:13 PM PDT  
CodyPendent wrote:

>...I thought it was lupis or lupin...<

Humourous and very erroneous recollections -- these. ;)
woozy
post #8  on August 24, 2004 - 10:56 PM PDT  
> On August 24, 2004 - 9:10 PM PDT SonjaBlue wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> woozy wrote:
>
> >...Now if ever there was a harmless animal, it was the bat.<
>
> Not if you were to disturb the cave...
>
Then they fly around you with a mystic fluttering of a thousand leather wings. Quite enchanting really. Reminds my of a time I was in Indianapolis downing sidecars (or were the boxcars? Disgustingly sweet with a rim of sugar?) and watching the bats fly around the capital building while I pumped an arts editor from New Jersey for information. Good times.

You don't have any particular affinity to bats do you? Cinema vampires change to bats by lifting their capes and flapping their arms. But don't you find that too damn silly?
SonjaBlue
post #9  on August 24, 2004 - 11:10 PM PDT  
woozy wrote:

> You don't have any particular affinity to bats do you?<

You are kidding?

> Cinema vampires change to bats by lifting their capes and flapping their arms. But don't you find that too damn silly?<

Hollywood nonsense.
woozy
post #10  on August 24, 2004 - 11:15 PM PDT  
> On August 24, 2004 - 11:10 PM PDT SonjaBlue wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> woozy wrote:
>
> > You don't have any particular affinity to bats do you?<
>
> You are kidding?
>
> > Cinema vampires change to bats by lifting their capes and flapping their arms. But don't you find that too damn silly?<
>
> Hollywood nonsense.
>
> ---------------------------------

So.... you don't have any particular affinity to bats...?

SonjaBlue
post #11  on August 24, 2004 - 11:39 PM PDT  
woozy wrote:

> So.... you don't have any particular affinity to bats...?<

Should I?

This subject would be only slightly more amusing than pale jokes.


Generally, the object of observed irony does not enjoy it as much as those who bring attention to it.

woozy
post #12  on August 24, 2004 - 11:45 PM PDT  
>
> Should I?

I won't if you won't.
>
> Generally, the object of observed irony does not enjoy it as much as those who bring attention to it.
>
Well, I'm not particularly enjoying it. So if you aren't either, there is no reason we need to continue.

Although, I do want to point out bats truely are one of the world's most majestic and gentle of creatures. And I'd say that to a Totoro, a cat, a blue beagle, a werewolf, or anyone as well as a vampire.
SonjaBlue
post #13  on August 24, 2004 - 11:51 PM PDT  
Who is the werewolf in this scenario?
artifex
post #14  on August 25, 2004 - 2:20 AM PDT  
> On August 24, 2004 - 10:56 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> Then they fly around you with a mystic fluttering of a thousand leather wings. Quite enchanting really.

Bats can carry rabies. In fact, there've been several people already this year who have died from infected bat bites, down in Mexico and further south.

Frogs, though... what can frogs do? Or, rather, toads. Or worms, for that matter. Sure, if you're a dead zombie (live ones still have a chance) than worms are a threat, but so are bacteria and insects and small animals running off with bits of your rotten corpse. Otherwise, hey, take them fishing.

Leeches, on the other hand, if they came up with leeches that could survive out of water and were mobile, I could see a good scary movie come out of that. Most of us guys can be scared with just one, properly placed, you know. Or, for a more realistic variation, have them crawl up sewer traps. Yeah, I see you cringing, now.
Shaky
post #15  on August 25, 2004 - 8:30 AM PDT  
> On August 25, 2004 - 2:20 AM PDT artifex wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > Bats can carry rabies. In fact, there've been several people already this year who have died from infected bat bites, down in Mexico and further south.
>

Please don't perpetuate that misinformation. That's an urban legend that won't die.

If a bat contracts rabies, the swelling of its brain will paralyze it because of the shape and size of its skull. Then it just falls on the ground and breathes heavily until it dies. A bat that is flying around is extremely unlikely to have rabies, and being bitten or scratched by an apparently healthy bat is extremely unlikely to give you rabies. The only real way to contract rabies from a bat is to pick up a sick one and try to play with it; but since bats prefer roosts in enclosed places that aren't easily accessible, finding one just lying out on the ground is very unusual.

That persistent myth about bats being carriers comes from the old test for rabies and some research from the 50s. In the test, a technician would sample the brain tissue of an animal suspected of being infected and test it for the presence of a rabies antibody. Some researchers did these tests on various kinds of animals and discovered that bats almost always tested positive for this antibody. From those results, they concluded that all bats carried rabies and spread it to other animals.

In reality, the test was bad. Later research showed that the bats did NOT carry rabies, but that another antibody that was present in virtually all bats caused a false positive under the old rabies test. Once new tests were developed, it became clear that bats did not have the antibody the earlier researchers assumed they had. Even so, because of the widespread dissemination in the 50s of the lie that bats carried rabies, the myth persists today. The sad thing is that even many veterinarians, people who should know better, still believe that bats are carriers.

And if you use a little common sense, you'll see that it's very difficult for a bat to contract rabies anyway. Rabies is contracted through bites or contact with bodily fluids. Because bats fly and roost in inaccessible places, they aren't nearly as likely to be bitten as ground dwelling animals. And if they are bitten, they are somewhat delicate creatures that will usually die from the bite itself long before the disease becomes contagious. Meanwhile, the majority of bat species do not feed on other animals that carry rabies, instead feeding on either fruit or insects. Most bats do NOT feed on blood; that's restricted to just a few species that don't live in most of the US.

That business about people being infected by bats usually turns out to be false assumptions fed by bad media coverage. In my home town, a woman awoke to a noise in her house and found a little brown bat flying around. After she got it out of the house, she noticed a scratch on her chest. She assumed the bat had made the scratch while she was asleep and was advised by a doctor, as a precaution, that she should undergo a series of rabies shots. When the local news picked up the story, however, they spun it to sound as though she had been infected by a raging rabid bat who attacked her in her sleep. There was no evidence she had been infected, but you'd think from the television coverage that rabid bats were on a rampage.

As for South and Central America, in a culture whose "journalists" often report voodoo curses and chupacabras as real, I don't think I would put too much faith in reports about rabid vampire bats attacking people.
Cinenaut
post #16  on August 25, 2004 - 8:40 AM PDT  
Bats eat mosquitos! Mosquitos carry disease! Build a bat house.
woozy
post #17  on August 25, 2004 - 9:27 AM PDT  
Thank you, shaky and Cinneanaut. Public dislike of bats is a bit of a pet peeve of mine. If anyone were to look a bat in the face they'd realize that not only are they not the creepy creature of myth, but also that they are out-right adorable!

Another totally false myth is bats get in your hair. This myth comes from the observation that occasionally a bat will fly around one's head but bats have good enough control to never get in the hair. But, a friend of mine said, it's creepy having a bat flying around my head. Well, I replied, think about why a bat would fly around your head. Mosquitos and other insects sense your body heat at dusk and swarm around your head. Bats see the bugs. Which would you rather have hanging around your head? A bunch of bugs or an adorable fuzzy little critter with soft leathery wings eating the bugs?

Sonja, the werewolf I had in mind was IronS icon, whazzisname. He transforms to a wolf, doesn't he?
woozy
post #18  on August 25, 2004 - 9:31 AM PDT  
Oh, and vampire bats (only exists in central and equitorial America) don't bite in the neck. If you sleep with your toes exposed it might bit your toe extract a drop of blood but their saliva contains a natural anti-septic congelant and anesthetic so if you were awake you wouldn't feel anything and it'd leave no mark whatsoever.
artifex
post #19  on August 25, 2004 - 10:12 AM PDT  
> On August 25, 2004 - 8:30 AM PDT Shaky wrote:
> > Bats can carry rabies. In fact, there've been several people already this year who have died from infected bat bites, down in Mexico and further south.
> Please don't perpetuate that misinformation. That's an urban legend that won't die.

BBC story
Erie County health warning
State Public Health Inspector for Illinois
Idaho health reminder
another article from NJ reporting bats as carriers

oh, and the CDC... "Most of the recent human rabies cases in the United States have been caused by rabies virus from bats."


What was that about misinformation, again? I think you'll find out that infected bats don't always instantly drop to the ground and flop around relatively harmlessly, etc.

Cinenaut
post #20  on August 25, 2004 - 10:19 AM PDT  
The bats are coming to get you, artifex.
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