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GreenCine Movie Talk
TV
By popular demand, a forum devoted to Mr. Philo T. Farnsworth's remarkable invention.
93

Cable TV Series
Topic by: Battie
Posted: June 19, 2006 - 9:02 AM PDT
Last Reply: July 13, 2006 - 4:04 PM PDT

page  1  2  3      prev | next
author topic: Cable TV Series
Battie
post #1  on June 19, 2006 - 9:02 AM PDT  
DIRECTING MASTERS SET FOR SECOND SEASON OF SHOWTIME'S MASTERS OF HORROR

Brad Anderson, Ernest Dickerson, Tom Holland Join Returning Helmers Dario Argento, John Carpenter, Joe Dante, Mick Garris, Stuart Gordon, Tobe Hooper and John Landis For Season Two

Los Angeles, CA, June 14, 2006 - A stellar lineup of directors has been confirmed for the second season of Showtime's critically-acclaimed anthology series Masters of Horror. Thirteen new one-hour episodes will debut this October on SHOWTIME.

Taking the directorial reins this season are Brad Anderson (Session Nine, The Machinist), Ernest Dickerson (Bones, Demon Knight), and Tom Holland (Fright Night, Child's Play). Returning for a second outing are directors Dario Argento (Suspira, Terror at the Opera), John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing), Joe Dante (The Howling, Gremlins), Mick Garris (Riding the Bullet, The Stand), Stuart Gordon (Re-Animator), Tobe Hooper (Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Poltergeist) and John Landis (American Werewolf in London). MASTERS OF HORROR grew out of an informal bi-monthly dinner attended by many of the horror genre's most highly regarded directors. The critically-acclaimed first season marked the first time that these prominent directors had joined forces to produce a series of new original horror films for television. Director Mick Garris transformed their collective desire to work together into reality, and will once again serve as the series Showrunner.

Nice line-up. Would you believe I think John Carpenter is half-sexy?

Stars include Sean Patrick Flanery (The Boondock Saints, The Dead Zone), Ron Perlman (Hellboy), Meat Loaf (Fight Club), Michael Ironside (Scanners, Total Recall), Marisa Coughlan (Boston Legal, Teaching Mrs. Tingle), George Wendt (Cheers), John Saxon (From Dusk till Dawn, A Nightmare on Elm Street), Ted Raimi (Spider-Man), Meredith Monroe (Dawson's Creek) and Matt Keeslar (Waiting for Guffman, Art School Confidential).

RAIMI!!!!!! WOOT! But why do they list him with Spider-Man? He had a cameo!

The following episodes have been confirmed:

Family, directed by John Landis and written by Brent Hanley, tells the story of a young married couple (Meredith Monroe and Matt Keeslar) that moves into a new home in a new city and finds out that their neighbor (George Wendt) is not what he seems.

Pelts, directed by Dario Argento, teleplay by Matt Venne, is an erotic tale about stolen raccoon pelts that violently turn against those that covet them in this Giallo-style adaptation of F. Paul Wilson's short story. Meatloaf and John Saxon star.

Erotic? Oookay. So uh, the pelts have a thing for a naked blonde who always seems to be showering?

The Damned Thing, directed by Tobe Hooper, inspired by Ambrose Bierce's classic short-story and written by Richard Christian Matheson, is the apocalyptic tale of a monstrous force that devastates Sheriff Kevin Reddle's family and his small Texas town. Sean Patrick Flanery, Marisa Coughlan and Ted Raimi star.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE!? What did small Texas towns ever do to you!? Why do they always set a horrible apocalypse in Texas?

Pro-Life, directed by John Carpenter, written by Drew McWeeny & Scott Swan, tells the story of a young girl trapped inside a clinic, who discovers the only thing more dangerous than her pursuers is the demonic secret that she carries within her. Ron Perlman, Mark Feuerstein, Emannuelle Vaugiere and Caitlin Wachs star.

\m/ Demon fetuses! Wooo!

The V Word, a vampire film directed by Ernest Dickerson and written by Mick Garris, reveals the punishment visited upon two teenage boys who make the very poor decision to break into a mortuary. Michael Ironside, Arjay Smith and Brandon Nadon star.

Sounds Like, directed by Brad Anderson, who also wrote the teleplay adapted from a short-story by Mike O'Driscoll, tells the story of Larry Pearce - an ordinary man blessed with a gift of extraordinary supernatural hearing that drives him to the brink of insanity and forces him to take violent action to silence the horrific cacophony in his head.

The Screwfly Solution, directed by Joe Dante, teleplay by Sam Hamm and adapted from the Raccoona Sheldon short-story, is about a nightmare virus infecting our nation, transforming men into psychotic killers who attack every woman who crosses their paths.

So...if you had a choice, death by virus or death by psychotic killer?

Valerie On The Stairs, directed and written by Mick Garris from a Clive Barker original screen story, tells the tale of a novelist who discovers there are fates worse than literary anonymity in this sexually-charged tale of terror.

We Scream For Ice Cream, directed by Tom Holland from David J. Schow's adaptation of John Farris' short-story, depicts a local ice cream man who, in this case, is turning sweet-toothed children against their parents.

The Black Cat, directed by Stuart Gordon and written by Dennis Paoli & Stuart Gordon, has the great Poe, out of ideas and short on cash, tormented by a black cat that will either destroy his life or inspire him to write one of his most famous stories

The executive producers of Masters of Horror are IDT Entertainment's Steve Brown, Morris Berger and John W. Hyde; Industry Entertainment's Andrew Deane & Keith Addis; and Nice Guy Productions' Mick Garris. Reunion Pictures' Lisa Richardson and Tom Rowe are producers. Industry's Adam Goldworm and Ben Browning are co-producers and will continue to serve as production executives on the series. IDT Entertainment Sales provides worldwide distribution of the series and Anchor Bay Entertainment, IDT Entertainment's home entertainment company, handles DVD and video releases.
----------------------------------------------------------
SHOWTIME ANNOUNCES PICKUP OF CRIME DRAMA WITH A TWIST, 'DEXTER,' STARRING MICHAEL C. HALL

Series Based Upon Jeff Lindsay's CriticallyAcclaimed Novel, Begins Production this Spring

LOS ANGELES, CA (January 19, 2006)  Showtime has ordered 12 episodes of an unusual one-hour crime thriller series, DEXTER, starring Emmy®- and Golden Globe®- nominated actor Michael C. Hall ("Six Feet Under"), it was announced today by Robert Greenblatt, Showtime President of Entertainment. The series follows Dexter Morgan (Hall), an incredibly likeable forensics expert for the Miami Metro Police Department, who moonlights as a serial killer with a penchant for inflicting his own unusual brand of justice  he kills people who truly deserve it.

"Dexter is the unusual exploration into the mind of a sociopathic killer  whom, in spite of his vigilante justice, the audience will find incredibly sympathetic and charismatic," said Greenblatt. "The power of this show, and the strength of Michael C. Hall's brilliant acting, is what sets it apart from anything else on television and makes it perfect for SHOWTIME. I'm thrilled to be reunited with Michael, after working together on Six Feet Under.'"

James Manos Jr. wrote the teleplay for the pilot (Emmy® Award for writing "The Sopranos"). John Goldwyn, Sara Colleton ("Live from Baghdad," "The Painted Veil"), and John Manos Jr. will executive produce the series. Former "Six Feet Under" helmer and acclaimed independent film director Michael Cuesta ("L.I.E.," "Twelve and Holding") directed the pilot.

Along with Hall, the series stars Jennifer Carpenter ("The Exorcism of Emily Rose"), Lauren Velez ("New York Undercover"), Julie Benz ("Jawbreaker"), Erik King ("National Treasure"), David Zayas ("The Interpreter") and James Remar ("Sex and the City"). Set to begin production in late spring, the series is scheduled to debut before the end of 2006 and will be shot on location in Miami.

DEXTER is based on the compelling novel "Darkly Dreaming Dexter" by Jeff Lindsay, a South Florida native. Orphaned at the age of four and harboring a traumatic secret, Dexter is adopted by a police officer who recognizes Dexter's homicidal tendencies and guides his son to channel his gruesome passion for human vivisection in a constructive way - by killing those heinous perpetrators that are above the law or who have slipped through the cracks of justice. A respected member of the police force, a perfect gentleman and a man with a soft spot for children, it's hard not to like Dexter. Although his drive to kill is unflinching, he struggles to emulate normal emotions he doesn't feel, and to keep up his appearance as a caring, socially responsible human being.

This could be good. Or just really creepy and emotionally disturbing.

----------------------------------------------------------
SAM NEILL, JEREMY NORTHAM AND HENRY CAVILL TO JOIN THE CAST OF NEW SHOWTIME DRAMATIC SERIES "THE TUDORS" WHICH STARS JONATHAN RHYS-MEYERS AS A YOUNG KING HENRY VIII

Production Begins May 22 in Ireland

LOS ANGELES (May 8, 2006) - Emmy® and Golden Globe®-nominated actor Sam Neill ("Jurassic Park," "Little Fish"), Jeremy Northam (CBS' "Martin & Lewis," "The Net," "Gosford Park") and Henry Cavill ("Tristan & Isolde") have just joined the cast of the new SHOWTIME dramatic series THE TUDORS, which stars Golden Globe®-winner Jonathan Rhys-Meyers ("Mission: Impossible III," "Match Point," "Elvis") as a young Henry VIII. Ten episodes have been ordered and Emmy®-winning television director Charles McDougall ("Desperate Housewives") will helm at least the first two episodes of the series, which is scheduled to air on the network in early 2007 after filming is completed in Ireland. Neill portrays Cardinal Wolsey, Northam plays Sir Thomas More, and Cavill portrays Charles Brandon.

THE TUDORS will focus on the rarely dramatized, tumultuous early years of King Henry VIII's nearly 40-year omnipotent reign (1509-1547) of England. In addition to dalliances with famous female consorts Catherine of Aragon and the infamous Anne Boleyn, the series delves into Henry's most notable political relationships, including those with philosopher Sir Thomas More, Cardinal Wolsey, head of the Catholic Church of England during its break with Rome, and Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk and Henry VIII's closest friend.

English filmmaker Charles McDougall's incredible work on "Desperate Housewives" and the original British "Queer As Folk" are evidence that this will be a newly imagined Henry VIII with a seductive, modern sensibility.

Michael Hirst ("Elizabeth"), series creator, writer, and executive producer, is writing all 10 episodes of THE TUDORS. Ben Silverman of Reveille, Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner of Working Title, Gary Howsam of Peace Arch Entertainment Group and Morgan O'Sullivan of World 2000 will also executive produce. The series will be co-produced by TM Productions and PA Tudors, Inc. with the participation of Bord Scannán na hÉireann/Irish Film Board, and the support of investment incentives of the Irish Film Industry provided by the Government of Ireland. It will be co-financed by Showtime Networks and Peace Arch, which will distribute the series outside of the United States.

...Besides the fact that the actors in question aren't exactly well-known for spectacular talent...it's been done. To death. What is this obsession with Henry VIII? I kinda prefer William the Conqueror. He found a relatively bloodless way of cementing Normandy's hold on England, via inter-cultural marriages. Nice!

I do wonder...what would happen if say...Pakistan and India were made to intermarry their populations? Or Palestine and Israel? Or America and the rest of the... Oh, wait, we've already done that! Oops.

----------------------------------------------------------
HBO is coming out with some, I'm sure. Rome got picked up for a second season, which is lovely! They also have umm...forget who, adapting Charlaine Harris's Dead series. "Dead in Dalllas," etc. Woot.

How can anyone not like a character named Sookie Stackhouse?

Which reminds me..."The Family Channel" is considering making Undead and Unwed by MaryJanice Davidson into a tb movie. I remember when that book was merely an eBook from a small, somewhat unknown company called Ellora's Cave. And now EC has its own models, print line and tour bus. Lovely! The ebook had more sex. >:|

Then there's Adventures of a Demon-Hunting Soccer Mom, which is supposedly going to be made into a movie. Yay for Julie Kenner. Seems like I have a few of her books signed...

Oh, and Laurell K. Hamilton's Guilty Pleasures (the big question is...will Anita be slut or prude?). After Buffy, vampires are making a comeback!

I've probably mentioned some of these before. *sigh*

----------------------------------------------------------
Right now I'm watching The L Word at a friend's house. How quickly she lured me into watching lesbian sex! It's a plot!

But I can see the appeal (originally this said: I can sex the appeal). For men...lesbian sex. And they can couch it in socially acceptable terms (plus, the girlfriends won't mind watching it wif 'em). For chicks...emotional drama and humor...and "Shane." Katherine Moennig is uhh...I'd be gay for her. :(

I'm also getting into the BBC's Hex...via another friend. More lesbians. *cough*
Ursus
post #2  on June 19, 2006 - 9:59 AM PDT  
HBO's "ROME" is fantastic! I can't wait to see the next season.

I also really like Ian McShane and the whole cast and show, "Deadwood." They have a very talented set of writters, directors, and actors that make the show not to be missed.

As for "The L Word," Battie: It puts me to sleep, as a bad knock-off of "Queer as Folk" for the ladies. Explicit male-on-male sexuality aside, the show was decent (from those episodes I sat through with my room mates in Berkeley). I would however go "gay" for Sarah Shahi , which wouldn't be too hard as I am already "OUT" over the ladies ;)

I am also slowly starting to dig Oliver Platt and Blythe Danner in "Huff."
Battie
post #3  on June 19, 2006 - 5:56 PM PDT  
> On June 19, 2006 - 9:59 AM PDT Ursus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> HBO's "ROME" is fantastic! I can't wait to see the next season.
>

I loved it. :P Made me appreciate...what's the actor's name who played Marcus? What? I'M BAD WITH NAMES!

> I also really like Ian McShane and the whole cast and show, "Deadwood." They have a very talented set of writters, directors, and actors that make the show not to be missed.
>
> As for "The L Word," Battie: It puts me to sleep, as a bad knock-off of "Queer as Folk" for the ladies. Explicit male-on-male sexuality aside, the show was decent (from those episodes I sat through with my room mates in Berkeley). I would however go "gay" for Sarah Shahi , which wouldn't be too hard as I am already "OUT" over the ladies ;)
>

Well, I'm watching the first season...Shahi doesn't show up till later, right? And I will admit, the sex scenes in every episode will get boring fast. Let's hope they cut back. >:|

> I am also slowly starting to dig Oliver Platt and Blythe Danner in "Huff."
> ---------------------------------
woozy
post #4  on June 19, 2006 - 7:55 PM PDT  
> Well, I'm watching the first season...Shahi doesn't show up till later, right? And I will admit, the sex scenes in every episode will get boring fast. Let's hope they cut back. >:|
>
That's the sad thing about sex scenes. Everyone tells movie producers they want more sex scenes yet whenever they put in the sex scenes viewers comkplain perplexed "Well, I *thought* I wanted sex scenes, but after a while they got .... boring. I'm not sure what I want." That's why women on women kissing hot for a while but then replaced with men kissing men and then we had that whole food and college roommates masturbating fad that no-one admitted to liking. So how long do you think the current large bear and grey dog phase we keep seeing on television is going to last?
Battie
post #5  on June 21, 2006 - 12:52 PM PDT  
> On June 19, 2006 - 7:55 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> That's the sad thing about sex scenes. Everyone tells movie producers they want more sex scenes yet whenever they put in the sex scenes viewers comkplain perplexed "Well, I *thought* I wanted sex scenes, but after a while they got .... boring. I'm not sure what I want." That's why women on women kissing hot for a while but then replaced with men kissing men and then we had that whole food and college roommates masturbating fad that no-one admitted to liking. So how long do you think the current large bear and grey dog phase we keep seeing on television is going to last?
> ---------------------------------

Well, I prefer quality to quantity. And The L Word is aiming for both, which dimenishes the former.

Anyway...Blade the tv series is coming out. *gag* But I'll probably watch for the violence and fangs.
Battie
post #6  on June 23, 2006 - 2:00 PM PDT  
Well, guess I'mma keep this thread alive by talking to myself...But that's okay. I do it all the time. Rotfdl.

A random memory surfaced recently...It was an HBO series a long time ago. Maybe as far back as ten years. It was an erotic sci-fi show that opened with CGI...it went over a city and ended up at the sexy robot host's home? Whatever. I just remember one episode sort of vividly. Well, part of it anyway. This guy gets a new android and, in the process of "trying it out," it gets stuck on his...Uhm-hmm...while giving him oral. While trying to get her unstuck, he manages to remove everything BUT the head. Seems like the urgency stems from his wife? coming home and either her father-in-law or his boss contacting him on the vid-phone? Very choppy memory, 'tis. Anyone happen to recall what the series was? I'm curious. It was pretty weird. Honestly, if I didn't know better, I'd say I was high while watching it, haha.
underdog
post #7  on June 23, 2006 - 2:13 PM PDT  
Wow, Battie, I'll admit I had no clue at first but my curiosity wa s certainly piqued! (And I guessed the answer wasn't Emmanuelle in Space ;-) )

So I cheated by looking on Wikipedia and found this list of HBO original programs.

The answer must be: Perversions of Science, ja?
Battie
post #8  on June 23, 2006 - 9:11 PM PDT  
> On June 23, 2006 - 2:13 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Wow, Battie, I'll admit I had no clue at first but my curiosity wa s certainly piqued! (And I guessed the answer wasn't Emmanuelle in Space ;-) )
>
> So I cheated by looking on Wikipedia and found this list of HBO original programs.
>
> The answer must be: Perversions of Science, ja?
> ---------------------------------

AWESOME! And it was nine years ago. Wow. Too bad it'll never be seen again. ;P
woozy
post #9  on June 23, 2006 - 10:50 PM PDT  

>HBO is coming out with some, I'm sure. Rome got picked up for a second season, which is lovely! They also have umm...forget who, adapting Charlaine Harris's Dead series. "Dead in Dalllas," etc. Woot.
>
> How can anyone not like a character named Sookie Stackhouse?
>

Gotta admit I liked the name. Unfortunately I could only get through half of her first book. I really did want to like it but ... *sigh* I just couldn't.

Now I feel bad. If you were to tell me you don't like one of the following a) the Oz books b) the Tellytubbies or c) Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I'd feel much better knowing you have a big a failing as taste as I do.

>> Which reminds me..."The Family Channel" is considering making Undead and Unwed by MaryJanice Davidson into a tb movie. I remember when that book was merely an eBook from a small, somewhat unknown company called Ellora's Cave. And now EC has its own models, print line and tour bus. Lovely! The ebook had more sex. >:|
>
The e-book had more sex than the print book or the e-book had more sex than "the family Channel"? Undead and Unwed was more readable than Dead until Dawn but primarily because it was campier and the author wasn't so earnest. Still "Bloodsucking Fiends" is better. *sigh* Now I feel bad again. I'd feel better is you said you didn't care much for a) Harry Potter, b) Desparate Housewives or c) Six Feet Under.

Of course, if you say you dislike Christopher Moore, than I'll *never* feel bad about disliking something you like ever again.

> Then there's Adventures of a Demon-Hunting Soccer Mom, which is supposedly going to be made into a movie. Yay for Julie Kenner. Seems like I have a few of her books signed...
>

Oooh, sounds fun. I haven't read her yet so I can't feel bad! Fun title.
Battie
post #10  on June 24, 2006 - 12:21 AM PDT  
> On June 23, 2006 - 10:50 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Gotta admit I liked the name. Unfortunately I could only get through half of her first book. I really did want to like it but ... *sigh* I just couldn't.
>
> Now I feel bad. If you were to tell me you don't like one of the following a) the Oz books b) the Tellytubbies or c) Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I'd feel much better knowing you have a big a failing as taste as I do.
>

Well, the book is geared toward female audiences. I'm sure the series will be more equal.

I haven't read the Oz books...I dislike the Tellietubbies and Buffy.

> The e-book had more sex than the print book or the e-book had more sex than "the family Channel"? Undead and Unwed was more readable than Dead until Dawn but primarily because it was campier and the author wasn't so earnest. Still "Bloodsucking Fiends" is better. *sigh* Now I feel bad again. I'd feel better is you said you didn't care much for a) Harry Potter, b) Desparate Housewives or c) Six Feet Under.
>
> Of course, if you say you dislike Christopher Moore, than I'll *never* feel bad about disliking something you like ever again.
>

The eBook had more sex than the rewritten print book, but I think it was also shorter. I'm rather surprised you read Undead and Unwed. It's a chick book! I don't much care for Harry Potter. Haven't watched Desperate Housewives...but after your lines, I'm considering it. And I caught a few episodes of Six Feet Under back when I had digital cable...two years ago. It was interesting, but not particularly inspiring. I imagine that, one day, I'll watch it throught rentals or pay-for-tv.

And you know I'm a fan of Moore!!

> Oooh, sounds fun. I haven't read her yet so I can't feel bad! Fun title.
>
> ---------------------------------

Well, Kenner's work has been, for me anyway, more lackluster than Davidson or Harris. But supposedly her latest books are very clever. I just haven't bought 'em yet. She also has one called The Givenchy Code, heh. But, hey, I'm always thrilled when an author I've met or know has something good happen to them, career-wise. And the movie could be very amusing.
woozy
post #11  on June 24, 2006 - 2:53 AM PDT  
>
> Well, the book is geared toward female audiences. I'm sure the series will be more equal.
>
It wasn't that. I actually usually prefer books written for a female audience. To the extent that I feel comfortable making such generalizations...

It was ... well, I didn't empathize. There's a southern passive feminity that I just don't get, I guess. And when the female characters are supposed to be strong and yet still are somewhat passive... well, I guess it's a cultural thing.

> I haven't read the Oz books...I dislike the Tellietubbies and Buffy.

You don't like Buffy. Okay, you are allowed to not like Buffy, if I'm allowed to not like Charlene Harris.

> >
>
> The eBook had more sex than the rewritten print book, but I think it was also shorter. I'm rather surprised you read Undead and Unwed. It's a chick book!

Ha! Don't you know I take such statements as a challenge? I don't really care much for chick fluff and don't like romances but if I have to pick up a light read I'd prefer a light fluff chick book to a light fluff dick book.

I was sitting arround bored waiting for my friend to cook me dinner (that sounds pretty horrible doesn't it? She had invited me to chase the squirrel out of her attic in exchange for dinner so...) and I was browsing her bookshelves and I was in the mood for a vampire novel and I found U&U and she said I wouldn't like it; it's fluffy and immaterial; and I said I wasn't in a heavy mood and it looked cute. It was cute. I won't say it was *good* but it was amusing if you can get over the fact that the heroine is an utter dingbat.


> I don't much care for Harry Potter. Haven't watched Desperate Housewives...but after your lines, I'm considering it.

I like Harry Potter though it is overrated and not as good as the positive critics claim it is. You might like desperate housewives. It's a "chick show" although it might appeal to an older demographic than you. Still, you should check it out.

Actually, before there was "chick lit" there was what my mom called "housewive novels". Those were kind of fun.

> And I caught a few episodes of Six Feet Under back when I had digital cable...two years ago. It was interesting, but not particularly inspiring. I imagine that, one day, I'll watch it throught rentals or pay-for-tv.

Six Feet Under is one of my favs. It just .... is. It's everything a soap opera ought to be. Engaging characters you feel you know and like and the simple engagement and heart-wrenching empathy of watching them exist.
>

>
> Well, Kenner's work has been, for me anyway, more lackluster than Davidson or Harris. But supposedly her latest books are very clever. I just haven't bought 'em yet. She also has one called The Givenchy Code, heh. But, hey, I'm always thrilled when an author I've met or know has something good happen to them, career-wise. And the movie could be very amusing.
> ---------------------------------

You've met Kenner? I wish I knew more fiction writers. I went to a small Chris Moore Book Signing (for "Fluke" it was pretty small and intimate). He seems like a really fun person to know.

Battie
post #12  on June 24, 2006 - 5:11 AM PDT  
> On June 24, 2006 - 2:53 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> It wasn't that. I actually usually prefer books written for a female audience. To the extent that I feel comfortable making such generalizations...
>
> It was ... well, I didn't empathize. There's a southern passive feminity that I just don't get, I guess. And when the female characters are supposed to be strong and yet still are somewhat passive... well, I guess it's a cultural thing.
>

Ha! Too funny. And to be honest, these days, most chick books don't feature only strong and tough characters. Think its the realization that not all women are made for aggressive behavior. The old feminist rejection of housewives has come to its end. :P

> You don't like Buffy. Okay, you are allowed to not like Buffy, if I'm allowed to not like Charlene Harris.
>

LoL! Does it help to say I sort of like Charmed, at times? I'll watch it all one day, lmfao. I mostly liked it for Piper. She was cute. ;P

> Ha! Don't you know I take such statements as a challenge? I don't really care much for chick fluff and don't like romances but if I have to pick up a light read I'd prefer a light fluff chick book to a light fluff dick book.
>

...I think I'll agree with you there.

> I was sitting arround bored waiting for my friend to cook me dinner (that sounds pretty horrible doesn't it? She had invited me to chase the squirrel out of her attic in exchange for dinner so...) and I was browsing her bookshelves and I was in the mood for a vampire novel and I found U&U and she said I wouldn't like it; it's fluffy and immaterial; and I said I wasn't in a heavy mood and it looked cute. It was cute. I won't say it was *good* but it was amusing if you can get over the fact that the heroine is an utter dingbat.
>

She was supposed to be a complete and utter dingbat. That was part of the fun. ;P I've read a few other MJD books, and she often goes either with dingbat, or with the sailor-mouthed badass whose physique doesn't quite match the mouth.

> I like Harry Potter though it is overrated and not as good as the positive critics claim it is. You might like desperate housewives. It's a "chick show" although it might appeal to an older demographic than you. Still, you should check it out.
>

I don't necessarily like chick shows. I like chick books. But shows usually end up boring me. I refuse to watch a soap opera. I've had a guy friend...a hardcore rock fan, plays the drums, etc...admit to watching soaps. But I absolutely refuse to fall into such silliness! No matter how hot some of the men are!

> Actually, before there was "chick lit" there was what my mom called "housewive novels". Those were kind of fun.
>

Remember any titles/authors/plots?

> Six Feet Under is one of my favs. It just .... is. It's everything a soap opera ought to be. Engaging characters you feel you know and like and the simple engagement and heart-wrenching empathy of watching them exist.
> >

Like I said, looked interesting, just not my kind of show.

> You've met Kenner? I wish I knew more fiction writers. I went to a small Chris Moore Book Signing (for "Fluke" it was pretty small and intimate). He seems like a really fun person to know.
> ---------------------------------

I believe so...I could be wrong, but I am pretty sure I met her at a booksigning. I've also met uhh..quite a few authors. The last one I went two, I spent about $140. Hehe. The profits went to charity, so I got to feel good about twice!

I met Angela Knight, Sherrilyn Kenyon/Kingley MacGregor, Christine Feehan, Nina Bruhns, Susan Donovan, Lora Leigh, Lori Foster, Jane Graves, PC Cast, Delilah Devlin, and several others I can't think of. I have autographed books floating around my collection, but I can't remember which ones, for the most part. I also think I've managed to sell some...lose at least one (my friend probably has it and has forgotten she has)...and the rest I'd have to hunt down, haha. It sucks that I can't remember. It also sucks that I didn't realize I was selling an autographed book. Actually, I'm routinely kicking myself for selling books that I now want to buy again. Should've bought more bookshelves instead of getting rid of books. :(

I could swear I met Nina Bangs. The one with the longest line, by far, was Sherrilyn Kenyon. The first time I met her, I got the chance to chat with her for about ten or twenty minutes. The early bird catches the worm! ;P But the second time, I had to wait in line for at least thirty minutes, rotfl. It took her a moment to remember me, but I was somewhat shocked she remembered me AT ALL. Then again, I have been told I make an impression, hehe. I've had one or two people come up to me and say, "Hey!" And I've no clue who they are.

I had the chance to meet James Patterson there, but I was scared away by uhh...the fame and the cameras. And the long line. And the fact that he was promoting his non-suspense writing, which I hadn't read.

It was fun though. I didn't bring a bag or anything (typical blonde--I used to be a redhead, but I let it grow out to my natural golden color). So I walked around with my arms so full of books I could barely pick up more. Had authors right and left comment on it, hehe. They know a hardcore fan when they see one, HA! Eventually one of them ended up giving me a box to carry my stuff in.

I also occasionally chat with authors through Yahoo. Angela Knight and MaryJanice Davidson are both very present on their loops, so I've had some convos with them (along with other fans). AK's group has some fantastic conversations. They used to have some semi-political ones, but when her books hit NY Times's bestseller lists, she had to stop. Too many people with too many diverse opinions. Stephanie Burke, Shiloh Walker (we is no longer on good terms, howeva), Christine Warren...occasionally Anne Bishop pops up on a group and chats. I've yet to meet her. :(
woozy
post #13  on June 24, 2006 - 10:23 AM PDT  
>
> Ha! Too funny. And to be honest, these days, most chick books don't feature only strong and tough characters. Think its the realization that not all women are made for aggressive behavior. The old feminist rejection of housewives has come to its end. :P
>
Yes, but so has the expectation of falling into housewivism.

I wanted to like Charlene Harris but ... I guess I didn't find her as witty or as grippin as she *should* have been. I mean, a vampire named "Bill" is mildly amusing but not worth making a conscious "The Vampire Bill" crack.


>
> She [MJD's heroine] was supposed to be a complete and utter dingbat. That was part of the fun. ;P

I know. And it's funny. It walks a thin line when a heroine who is supposed to be empathetic but is also a comic character. She pulls it off. On the whole it is fluffy escapism. I may but probably won't read more of hers. Actually the first thing I picked up of hers was a collection of short stories ("Undead and loving it") about vampire and werewolf sex. The first story was about a werewolf seducing a Salvation Army Santa which had a potentially quirky beginning but turned into a rather boring and long sex scene with no, *ahem*, climax (as a story). My friend said the collection of stories wasn't particularly good. I got curious about her laws of werewolves and vampires so I read U&U.

> I don't necessarily like chick shows [e.g. Desperate Housewives]. I like chick books. But shows usually end up boring me.

I wonder why that is. Give DH a try. I think you'll like it. I'm 5/6th of the way through the first season and it's edginess peeked around the first third or quarter but it's still a guilty pleasure.

> I refuse to watch a soap opera. I've had a guy friend...a hardcore rock fan, plays the drums, etc...admit to watching soaps. But I absolutely refuse to fall into such silliness!

I guess that's how I feel about anime. *sigh* I got caught up in the old Dr. Who, though.

>
> > Actually, before there was "chick lit" there was what my mom called "housewive novels". Those were kind of fun.
> >
>
> Remember any titles/authors/plots?
>
Let's see. "Diary of a Mad Houswife" was the spearhead. Then there was "Norma-Jean, the termite queen". These were both written in the early mid seventies. You probably wouldn't like them. Suburban housewives hitting a sense of ennui and making small victories. Norma-Jean was witty and had a clever floating perspective reflecting a bored woman pretty stuck in her life but not sure exactly how or why. "I have good periphreal vision. All paranoids do." I thought was a pretty funny line, as was the five year old kid having an imaginary friend named "Fokey Fuckerhead".

Battie
post #14  on June 24, 2006 - 11:42 AM PDT  
> On June 24, 2006 - 10:23 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I know. And it's funny. It walks a thin line when a heroine who is supposed to be empathetic but is also a comic character. She pulls it off. On the whole it is fluffy escapism. I may but probably won't read more of hers. Actually the first thing I picked up of hers was a collection of short stories ("Undead and loving it") about vampire and werewolf sex. The first story was about a werewolf seducing a Salvation Army Santa which had a potentially quirky beginning but turned into a rather boring and long sex scene with no, *ahem*, climax (as a story). My friend said the collection of stories wasn't particularly good. I got curious about her laws of werewolves and vampires so I read U&U.
>

MJD is probably the fluffiest stuff I have on my shelf. And more than once I've wanted to mention the rather...lack of romance in her romances (and some of her shorter stories can seem too light indeed), but I really enjoy her writing to much to give a damn. Samn thing goes for Morgan Hawke, but I like her work cuz it's hardcore erotica, hehe. And occasionally amusing.

> I wonder why that is. Give DH a try. I think you'll like it. I'm 5/6th of the way through the first season and it's edginess peeked around the first third or quarter but it's still a guilty pleasure.
>

LoL! Okay, you may be right. I enjoyed the first season of Weeds a lot, and that is kinda a chick show. Have you seen it? I'm waiting for Showtime to come out with season two!

> I guess that's how I feel about anime. *sigh* I got caught up in the old Dr. Who, though.
>

I can't do dated shows. I just can't. I have enough trouble watching dated, though good, movies. >_<

> Let's see. "Diary of a Mad Houswife" was the spearhead. Then there was "Norma-Jean, the termite queen". These were both written in the early mid seventies. You probably wouldn't like them. Suburban housewives hitting a sense of ennui and making small victories. Norma-Jean was witty and had a clever floating perspective reflecting a bored woman pretty stuck in her life but not sure exactly how or why. "I have good periphreal vision. All paranoids do." I thought was a pretty funny line, as was the five year old kid having an imaginary friend named "Fokey Fuckerhead".
> ---------------------------------

*giggle*
woozy
post #15  on June 24, 2006 - 11:54 AM PDT  
>
> MJD is probably the fluffiest stuff I have on my shelf.

Then you are in good shape. My darling baby sister (who is ten years older than you... *sigh*) used to love teenage romances and, *gosh*, were those fluffy! She likes the trend for art history romances.

> LoL! Okay, you may be right. I enjoyed the first season of Weeds a lot, and that is kinda a chick show. Have you seen it? I'm waiting for Showtime to come out with season two!

No, haven't seen it.

> I can't do dated shows. I just can't. I have enough trouble watching dated, though good, movies. >_<
>
Interesting...

I feel sad when good things seem dated. It's amazing how things seem dated no matter what they do. There's a few exceptions.

>
> *giggle*
> ---------------------------------

How do you feel about dated novels. Actually, *those* bug me much more than dated tv shows. I think I'll reread "Norma Jean" though. Heck, It takes place in the San Francisco peninsula and it'd be really ironic if I get a sense of nostalgia from it.

Battie
post #16  on June 24, 2006 - 12:23 PM PDT  
> On June 24, 2006 - 11:54 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Then you are in good shape. My darling baby sister (who is ten years older than you... *sigh*) used to love teenage romances and, *gosh*, were those fluffy! She likes the trend for art history romances.
>

Hmm...I like on teenage romance author. Jenny Carroll...aka Patricia Cabot/Meggin Cabot/Meg Cabot. Same author of The Princess Diaries, which I've not read. The Missing books are hilarious. The heroine crushes on a somewhat older, sexier boy who refuses to seriously return her attention because she's jailbait. A bit more "mature" than I expect. (Actually, the series revolves around the ability to find missing people after seeing their picture. Suffice it to say that the FBI is fond of her, and she ain't fond of them. Lifetime made it into a crappy, completely unrecognizable series. Grr.) Can't remember why I picked them up in the library a few years ago, I must've read an excerpt, giggled, and became a fan instantly. :P

> No, haven't seen it.
>

Well, it sounds like it's right up your alley. Maybe more so than Housewives, since it has more seriousness at times. And, IMO, better actresses.

> Interesting...
>
> I feel sad when good things seem dated. It's amazing how things seem dated no matter what they do. There's a few exceptions.
>

Though sometimes dated it fun. I love 80s horror movies!

> How do you feel about dated novels. Actually, *those* bug me much more than dated tv shows. I think I'll reread "Norma Jean" though. Heck, It takes place in the San Francisco peninsula and it'd be really ironic if I get a sense of nostalgia from it.
>

Only dated novels I've read were really old. Only one I think I've enjoyed that was more than twenty years...Catch 22.
woozy
post #17  on June 28, 2006 - 6:26 PM PDT  
>
> The eBook had more sex than the rewritten print book, but I think it was also shorter. I'm rather surprised you read Undead and Unwed. It's a chick book!

Ha!!

I just realized you wrote about this nearly a year ago in the R&R thread and I hadn't read it back then. When I *did* read it a few months ago I didn't put two and two together.

Actually the (print) book did need a bit more sex.

Sigh. My late departed Sonja was familiar with it.
Battie
post #18  on June 29, 2006 - 8:35 AM PDT  
> On June 28, 2006 - 6:26 PM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Ha!!
>
> I just realized you wrote about this nearly a year ago in the R&R thread and I hadn't read it back then. When I *did* read it a few months ago I didn't put two and two together.
>
> Actually the (print) book did need a bit more sex.
>
> Sigh. My late departed Sonja was familiar with it.
> ---------------------------------

LOL! Yeah, apparently, though, the author was pushed into even more sex than she wanted in the eBook...Mostly it was a scene between Sink Lair and three or four other women. Rotfl. At once, I mean. With Betsy watching..
Battie
post #19  on June 29, 2006 - 8:42 AM PDT  
Forgot to add..

That scene, IMO, actually enhanced Sinclair's appeal. It showed he good get laid without Betsy around, and, in truth, gave him a bit more backbone and allure. There is a reason why women like James Bond and other like characters...
woozy
post #20  on June 29, 2006 - 12:30 PM PDT  
> On June 29, 2006 - 8:35 AM PDT Battie wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> ...Mostly it was a scene between Sink Lair and three or four other women. Rotfl. At once, I mean. With Betsy watching..
> ---------------------------------

Uh, that was in the print book.

I was kind of hoping she'd have a little more lesbian sex with the "cutie" and a little less talk about lesbian sex with the cutie. If things are "different" when you are a vampire I think the fact that the cutie likes girls and Betsy doesn't doesn't bear much to talk about. Still bathing together was pretty cute.

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