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In The Theaters
I just saw it and boy does it...
318

Anticipated Fall Movies
Topic by: Cinenaut
Posted: August 31, 2004 - 2:20 PM PDT
Last Reply: September 27, 2004 - 5:21 PM PDT

page  1  2  3  4      prev | next
author topic: Anticipated Fall Movies
Cinenaut
post #1  on August 31, 2004 - 2:20 PM PDT  
I went to see Garden State on Saturday, and I was happy to see trailers for The Life Aquatic, I [heart] Huckabees and Sideways. I'm really looking forward to this crop of fall movies!
underdog
post #2  on August 31, 2004 - 3:01 PM PDT  
> On August 31, 2004 - 2:20 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I went to see Garden State on Saturday, and I was happy to see trailers for The Life Aquatic, I [heart] Huckabees and Sideways. I'm really looking forward to this crop of fall movies!
> ---------------------------------


I am too! In addition to the films you mentioned (SIDEWAYS I'm also looking forward to because it was filmed in my home county, Sta Barbara and features much ado about the local wines) - I'm also eagerly anticipating:

THE MOTORCYCLE DIARIES (which my dad saw last weekend in a screening with the director present)

CRIMINAL (by a Soderbergh protege, a remake of Nine Queens)

Curious about: SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW, which has an incredible look. But hard to tell if it's actually *good*.

Hard not to be curious about: TEAM AMERICA WORLD POLICE

And how about John Waters' new one? A DIRTY SHAME, starring Tracey Ullmann as an uptight mom who turns lasciviious and finds acceptance with other like-mided suburbanites [description from Premiere Magazine] (including, gulp, Johnny Knoxville, and Selma Blair)

Then there's THE INCREDIBLES in November, and more coming...

Also a lot of films that seem like they could be okay or suck greatly.


Eoliano
post #3  on August 31, 2004 - 5:48 PM PDT  
Okay, here's my list of anticipated Fall releases:

Alexander -- Does Oliver Stone have what it takes to make an epic or will he fail as miserably as Wolfgang Peterson did with Troy? I have to admit though, something really bothers me about Colin Farrell's hair.

The Aviator -- Will Scorsese make a comeback after his last interesting failure or will he find the right combination of Scorsesesque ingredients in the life of Howard Hughes? One can only hope. I have one outstanding caveat that rankles; DiCaprio is too damned pretty to play the lead.

Best of Youth/Meglio gioventu -- I saw this wonderful film at thee PSIFF and found it very moving, though it will be interesting to see its length will be unreasonably trimmed for American audiences.

Closer -- For the simple reason that I have always enjoyed much of Nichols' better work, though the cast holds much interest as well.

Goodbye Dragon Inn -- I've heard good things about this film so my hopes are relatively high and I'm usually a sucker for films that celebrate film.

House of Flying Daggers -- A friend of mine just saw the film and enjoyed it even more than Hero, and Zhang Yimou has once again assembled a marvelous cast.

Infernal Affairs -- I'm looking forward to seeing this film not only because it stars Tony Leung, but also because it's been languishing on my queue for far too long.

Kinsey -- This might be an entertaining movie, not only because I remember all the hoopla surrounding the Kinsey Report, but also to see if Liam Neeson will find something to bite into.

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou -- I want to catch this film first and foremost, and maybe for the only reason it needs; because it's a Wes Anderson film.

The Motorcycle Diaries -- Taking a road trip with Che Guevara in the 50s seems like something worthwhile, though I'm certainly not expecting The Wild One.

Ocean's Twelve -- What, not another casino heist movie! Hey, why not, this time it's on the Riviera with all those beautiful people.

Ray -- For the music, the memories, and for the Genius. After seeing his performance in Collateral, I think that Jamie Foxx will pull it off. Though I much preferred the working title, Unchain My Heart.

A Very Long Engagement -- For Audrey Tautou and to see if Jeunet can wow us again.

Oh yeah, and I definitely want to Meet the Fockers!
ALittlefield
post #4  on August 31, 2004 - 8:57 PM PDT  
> On August 31, 2004 - 5:48 PM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
>
> The Aviator -- I have one outstanding caveat that rankles; DiCaprio is too damned pretty to play the lead.


And Cary Grant as Cole Porter? Gary Cooper as Lou Gherig? Salman Hayak as Frida Khalo? Tom Cruise as Ron Kovic? Pretty movie stars have been playing "normal" people for years. Personally, I think DiCaprio should be fine, especially under Scorsase's direction, and this is the Fall film I look forward to the most. (And how in the hell has Scorsase never won an Oscar for best director? Hopefully this will turn the tide.)
jross3
post #5  on September 1, 2004 - 12:29 AM PDT  
My big movies for this fall are The Forgotten and Ghost in the Shell: Innocence. GitS is just kind of a natural choice for me (any anime other than pokemon or (recently) Yu-gi-oh that shows in the (only) local theater is top on my to-do list), but The Forgotten looks kinda twisted and interesting. My head's spinning already!

I'll probably head out to see Resident Evil, too, provided I get a chance. The first one was kinda... bad... but that's not gonna stop me from seeing the second one! Zombies have taken over the world.... Again!

Also, my mother (47) and me nephew (5) have me booked (not invited. I have to go) for SpongeBob Squarepants. I like the Sponge man as much as anyone else might, and I can easily sit through two or three hours of non-stop spongebob (Hell, I can easily go four, or even six or seven, since we have both west and east coast channels), even if I've already seen the episodes ten times already that weekend (as anyone else that watches other people's kids can easily understand). Still, I sense that this will have a higher "going-to-make-my-annoying-nephew-more-annoying-than-usual" content than anything else that has happened over the last five years (including Spiderman 2, which compelled him to try to climb on the walls in the Taco Bell bathroom). Oh well... I must accept my fate.
Eoliano
post #6  on September 1, 2004 - 3:36 AM PDT  
>Salman Hayak as Frida Khalo... Pretty movie stars have been playing "normal" people for years... And how in the hell has Scorsase never won an Oscar for best director?

Hold on to your fangs! You are being much too serious by taking me too seriously, though I must say that Salma Hayak did at least make a serious attempt at resembling Frida Kahlo. Scorsese never won an Oscar for the simple reason that he is an outsider, plus, he's not in the habit of making feel good movies and his films don't generate enough money at the box office to satisfy the Hollywood swing vote.
underdog
post #7  on September 1, 2004 - 9:44 AM PDT  
> On September 1, 2004 - 12:29 AM PDT jross3 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I'll probably head out to see Resident Evil, too, provided I get a chance. The first one was kinda... bad... but that's not gonna stop me from seeing the second one! Zombies have taken over the world.... Again!
>

Speaking of zombies, I forgot to mention I'm really looking forward to SHAUN OF THE DEAD (just saw the coming attraction for it last night, looks great, was a big hit in UK).

On the other hand, I also saw a coming attraction for TAXI, which looks excruciatingly terrible and preposterous. Jimmy Fallon as a lead in any movie is an excruciating thought, and then the dialogue... oy, painful.

> Also, my mother (47) and me nephew (5) have me booked (not invited. I have to go) for SpongeBob Squarepants.

At least you have a nephew as an excuse! I'll probably go without a child to drag me. (Uh, bargain matinee only though.)

sinisterguffaw
post #8  on September 1, 2004 - 11:35 AM PDT  
> On September 1, 2004 - 9:44 AM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> At least you have a nephew as an excuse! I'll probably go without a child to drag me. (Uh, bargain matinee only though.)
>
>
> ---------------------------------

Here's your excuse: "That guy who does the voice for the sponge guy... he was a regular on Mr. Show!" Say it just like that, and everyone will understand!
jross3
post #9  on September 1, 2004 - 1:21 PM PDT  
> On September 1, 2004 - 11:35 AM PDT sinisterguffaw wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On September 1, 2004 - 9:44 AM PDT underdog wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > At least you have a nephew as an excuse! I'll probably go without a child to drag me. (Uh, bargain matinee only though.)
> >
> >
> > ---------------------------------
>
> Here's your excuse: "That guy who does the voice for the sponge guy... he was a regular on Mr. Show!" Say it just like that, and everyone will understand!
> ---------------------------------

Exactly!
I've seen this coming for at least a month, though. My mother and I went to... some other movie, or something, and saw the trailer. "You will be asked the ultimate question...... 'Who lives in a pinapple under the sea?'"
I gotta admit, I didn't see it coming. That was a pretty good trailer... up to that point. Kinda went downhill after that - I guess it doesn't matter, though; any kids (or parents, it seems) watching it were probably too busy freaking out to pay attention after that.
ALittlefield
post #10  on September 1, 2004 - 7:36 PM PDT  
> On September 1, 2004 - 3:36 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> >Salman Hayak as Frida Khalo... Pretty movie stars have been playing "normal" people for years... And how in the hell has Scorsase never won an Oscar for best director?
>
> Hold on to your fangs! You are being much too serious by taking me too seriously,
Sorry, didn't mean to jump on you, just making a point.

Scorsese never won an Oscar for the simple reason that he is an outsider, plus, he's not in the habit of making feel good movies and his films don't generate enough money at the box office to satisfy the Hollywood swing vote.

All of this is true, and yet Scorsese is more of a Hollywood insider than Woody Allen, who won for Annie Hall. (And Scorsese's movies even make more money, too.)
Adding to the insult is that he was beaten twice by actors who had never directed a movie before! (Robert Redford for Ordinary People in 1980, beating him out over Raging Bull, and Kevin Costner for Dances with Wolves in 1990, beating him out over Goodfellas.) The termity of the Academy!

Eoliano
post #11  on September 2, 2004 - 11:17 AM PDT  
> All of this is true, and yet Scorsese is more of a Hollywood insider than Woody Allen, who won for Annie Hall. (And Scorsese's movies even make more money, too.) Adding to the insult is that he was beaten twice by actors who had never directed a movie before! (Robert Redford for Ordinary People in 1980, beating him out over Raging Bull, and Kevin Costner for Dances with Wolves in 1990, beating him out over Goodfellas.) The termity of the Academy!

Yes, well, that was to be expected. Annie Hall was a tremendously popular success, and for a low budget film made tons of money, and given the contenders in 1977, it deserved the honors it received. At the time their films were made, Redford and Costner were the darlings of Hollywood, though I'll wager Raging Bull came in a close second to Redford's film. Nevertheless, Raging Bull and GoodFellas won several critic's awards in 1980 and 1990, respectively, though GoodFellas was the more lauded of the two, no doubt because Scorsese's stature as a director had risen substantially.

Hollywood is fickle to say the least, and the Oscars are rarely barometers of artistic achievement. Over the decades they have almost become irrelevant to me, and although I'm always curious to see who gets the gold, I'm not very interested in watching the ceremony anymore. Sure, I'd love to see a fellow New York Sicilian win an award, but I'm not taking any bets, not yet anyway. If Scorsese's film is brilliant and deserving and it wins, it will bring tears of joy, and if it doesn't then they will be tears of rage.
Cinenaut
post #12  on September 2, 2004 - 11:48 AM PDT  
The Machinist seems intriguing. What happens if you stop feeding Christian Bale?
dh22
post #13  on September 2, 2004 - 12:23 PM PDT  
> On September 2, 2004 - 11:48 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> What happens if you stop feeding Christian Bale?
> ---------------------------------

I dunno. Let's try it.
sinisterguffaw
post #14  on September 2, 2004 - 2:07 PM PDT  
I heard some talk about that movie. Sweet Jude, how could anyone put themselves through that much crap for a movie role? Isn't there some rule that anyone who gains or loses lots of weight, or in someother way disfigures themselves, automatically gets nominated for an oscar?

In that case, Congrats to you, Christian Bale! I knew you had it in ya!
Eoliano
post #15  on September 2, 2004 - 4:30 PM PDT  
> Isn't there some rule that anyone who gains or loses lots of weight, or in someother way disfigures themselves, automatically gets nominated for an oscar?

Either that or they can greatly increase their chances of wining an Oscar by playing someone who is deaf, dumb or blind... or autistic.
Cinenaut
post #16  on September 2, 2004 - 4:39 PM PDT  
> On September 2, 2004 - 4:30 PM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Either that or they can greatly increase their chances of wining an Oscar by playing someone who is deaf, dumb or blind... or autistic.
> ---------------------------------

Unless, of course, your name is Roger Daltrey.
Eoliano
post #17  on September 2, 2004 - 5:04 PM PDT  
Speaking of blind characters, Kitano's Zatoichi is finally opening here on Friday and should have been on my list! An obvious oversight on my part.
ALittlefield
post #18  on September 2, 2004 - 8:17 PM PDT  
> On September 2, 2004 - 11:17 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>!
>
> Yes, well, that was to be expected. Annie Hall was a tremendously popular success, and for a low budget film made tons of money, and given the contenders in 1977, it deserved the honors it received.


I agree, but it was up against STAR WARS, so a lot of geek fan boys (and girls) would be up in arms over it. And I've also heard that ANNIE HALL did not make that much money, although I'm sure it returned on its budget. For the most part, Allen's films do not make any money in the US, but they are successful in Europe, where perhaps his cynical views of love and religion are more easily embraced.
Eoliano
post #19  on September 2, 2004 - 8:31 PM PDT  
> I agree, but it was up against STAR WARS, so a lot of geek fan boys (and girls) would be up in arms over it.

Oh well, that's a crying shame and my heart goes out to all of them but they didn't have the vote.

> And I've also heard that ANNIE HALL did not make that much money, although I'm sure it returned on its budget.

It did better than that and as I said, Annie Hall did well at the box office for a low budget film.

> Allen's films do not make any money in the US, but they are successful in Europe, where perhaps his cynical views of love and religion are more easily embraced.

Especially in France.
kamapuaa
post #20  on September 2, 2004 - 9:49 PM PDT  
> I agree, but it was up against STAR WARS, so a lot of geek fan boys (and girls) would be up in arms over it. And I've also heard that ANNIE HALL did not make that much money, although I'm sure it returned on its budget. For the most part, Allen's films do not make any money in the US, but they are successful in Europe, where perhaps his cynical views of love and religion are more easily embraced.

This got me curious, so I looked it up - Annie Hall was $4 million to make, $38 million in US returns. Considering this was 27 years ago, I imagine it was considered a big success (although Star Wars was $11 mil./$215 mil.)

I don't think Allen's modern, less financially sucessful movies are particularly cynical of love and religion. Maybe I'm from another planet because I've heard others say the same thing, but I find most of his post-"Stardust Memories" movies uplifting. I think they're unpopular because Woody Allen is considered insufferable.
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