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GreenCine Movie Talk
In The Theaters
I just saw it and boy does it...
318

Been to the movies lately? The Brothers Grimm and more...
Topic by: Cinenaut
Posted: August 29, 2005 - 10:42 AM PDT
Last Reply: October 4, 2005 - 3:17 PM PDT

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author topic: Been to the movies lately? The Brothers Grimm and more...
Cinenaut
post #1  on August 29, 2005 - 10:42 AM PDT  
I went to see Murderball and The Brothers Grimm this weekend. Murderball is fantastic. It's a documentary about Paralympic Rugby players who slam into each other full tilt in wheelchairs. If the subject matter doesn't sound appealing, go see it anyway, it's totally fascinating and entertaining.

The Brothers Grimm is better than the critics have been saying it is. I wonder if Terry Gilliam is suffering fom crtical backlash. He's an "important" director so all his films have to be important.


Broken Flowers: Jim Jarmusch... Bill Murray... Low key hilarity.
Battie
post #2  on August 29, 2005 - 2:05 PM PDT  
Don't taunt me so. :(
Cinenaut
post #3  on August 29, 2005 - 3:06 PM PDT  
Awww, they'll be in your GreenCine queue before you know it.


The Brothers Grimm has some really imaginative special effects sequences -- one in particular involving some very unexpected behavior from a horse.
ALittlefield
post #4  on August 31, 2005 - 8:30 PM PDT  
Terry Gilliam to me is an odd director in that I found his work with Python and his first few films great, but then, starting with THE FISHER KING, he seemed to become fascinated with showing us really ugly images for no reason (Robin Williams's rotting teeth, Bruce Willis's pool of vomit in 12 MONKEES). For me this fascination hit a low point in FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS, which is one of the films that I have ever walked out on. (Even fans of the film have admitted to me that they couldn't understand most of what Johnny Depp was saying). Still, I am curious about GRIMM, maybe because it sounds like he's going back to the TIME BANDITS/BARON MUCHANSEN territory that I enjoyed so much.
Cinenaut
post #5  on September 1, 2005 - 2:14 PM PDT  
> On August 31, 2005 - 8:30 PM PDT ALittlefield wrote:
> ---------------------------------
[snip]
> Still, I am curious about GRIMM, maybe because it sounds like he's going back to the TIME BANDITS/BARON MUCHANSEN territory that I enjoyed so much.
> ---------------------------------

Yes, I'd say that this harks back to the Time Bandits/Baron Munchausen days, but perhaps the comedy component is not as successful. I think it will outlast the critical drubbing and then be "rediscovered" on DVD.
Phibes
post #6  on September 8, 2005 - 11:06 PM PDT  
BROTHERS GRIMM is a choppy mess with great production design and a cool sequence involving a child, a horse, and cobwebs... Too bad Terry can't get his true visions on screen anymore.
Eoliano
post #7  on September 9, 2005 - 3:46 PM PDT  
> BROTHERS GRIMM is a choppy mess with great production design and a cool sequence involving a child, a horse, and cobwebs... Too bad Terry can't get his true visions on screen anymore.

I didn't get the impression that Brothers Grimm was distinctly a Terry Gilliam project, more like an "I needed their money" project so that he could do his own thing, which of course, he has. Here is an interview.

I managed to see Werner Herzog's Grizzly Man, and The Constant Gardener, both of which I highly recommend, the former for its bemused take on a terribly wrong-headed and misguided animal rights activist, and the latter for being a terrific political thriller with a finely nuanced performance by Ralph Fiennes.
Cinenaut
post #8  on September 10, 2005 - 7:27 PM PDT  
The Constant Gardener was also directed by the fellow that directed City of God, so that would be enough to recommend it to me (and lots of other people), but I haven't seen it yet.

Howl's Moving Castle finally made it to my neck of the woods (or at least the next neck of the woods over) and I found it utterly captivating. I was prepared for something of a letdown after the reviews I read, but it was pure Miyazaki enjoyment through and through.
Battie
post #9  on September 10, 2005 - 9:22 PM PDT  
> On September 10, 2005 - 7:27 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> The Constant Gardener was also directed by the fellow that directed City of God, so that would be enough to recommend it to me (and lots of other people), but I haven't seen it yet.
>
> Howl's Moving Castle finally made it to my neck of the woods (or at least the next neck of the woods over) and I found it utterly captivating. I was prepared for something of a letdown after the reviews I read, but it was pure Miyazaki enjoyment through and through.
> ---------------------------------

I really want to see The Constant Gardner. Perhaps more so than I want to see any of the horror movies coming out this upcoming year (which is saying a lot for me). Mmph!
dpowers
post #10  on September 11, 2005 - 9:06 AM PDT  
i just saw the brothers grimm last night. it made me want to see time bandits again for comparison of the handling of mixing reality/grotesquerie/fantasy, maybe to look for cultural changes. fantasy films have been redefined in recent movies as sprawling adventures, after many years of inattention. i've always liked scary witch stories, particularly russian ones, and this has that sort of feeling. i really liked the sense of "this-is-happening-this-isn't-happening" throughout the film.
dpowers
post #11  on September 11, 2005 - 9:07 AM PDT  
uh older fantasy movies had sprawl. but harry potter and lord of the rings are sprawls of sprawl.
Eoliano
post #12  on September 11, 2005 - 10:08 AM PDT  
> i just saw the brothers grimm last night. it made me want to see time bandits again for comparison of the handling of mixing reality/grotesquerie/fantasy, maybe to look for cultural changes. fantasy films have been redefined in recent movies as sprawling adventures, after many years of inattention. i've always liked scary witch stories, particularly russian ones, and this has that sort of feeling. i really liked the sense of "this-is-happening-this-isn't-happening" throughout the film.

You lit a candle under my seat deep, so maybe I'll head for the multiplex today and see Brothers Grimm...

> uh older fantasy movies had sprawl. but harry potter and lord of the rings are sprawls of sprawl.

Since we've seen so much gothic fantasy and enough Middle Earth to blanket the entire state of Texas and then some, maybe it's time to rediscover some old material, say some Homeric and/or ancient Greek themes like Ulysses or Jason and the Argonauts again, but in top notch productions, not like the crap done for TV... So who are today's Ray Harryhausens and Bernard Herrmanns anyway? Do they even exist or am I just fantasizing?
dpowers
post #13  on September 11, 2005 - 1:01 PM PDT  
> maybe it's time to rediscover some ... Homeric and/or ancient Greek themes

jason is just amazing. every time i even think of watching it i get goosebumps.

> So who are today's Ray Harryhausens and Bernard Herrmanns anyway? Do they even exist or am I just fantasizing?

they're working for pixar and such. but they're still too tied to the disney tradition-slash-business-practice to do adventure stories. i think they'll get there though now that LOTR has shown that geek stories are cool. actually i think the new king kong is a step (back) in that direction, because it deals with many of the original film's adventure story elements instead of going for the tragic monster romance only.

technology has really supplanted the natural world in our fantasies. we've totally dominated nature and it's been several generations in the rich world without the presence of decay that isn't related to poverty (and thus failure). so there's a political element. to be afraid of the future, of machines and politics, is in a sense to brag that you've dominated nature and all you're worried about now is the bad apples you're growing in your own orchard.
Chamelion
post #14  on September 12, 2005 - 3:38 AM PDT  
I saw the Brothers Grimm and I was sorely disappointned. While the special effects and sets were beautiful, and the over all story pretty straigt forward, it was a mess and a half... like parts of a jigsaw puzzle forced to fit where they should not.

true, it is all opinionated, but I was rather bothered by some events in the film which to some may be considered 'dark comedy' but to me were uterly tasteless.
I wont spoil it for anyone, but a certain white fluffy kitten comes to mind.

And for that alone, BG won't be added to my DVD collection... it just, in the end, was not that entertaining.. and I am a very very very forgiving person in terms of movies...

Skeleton Key wasn't all that great, but had some tense, fun moments.

Red Eye is AmAZING

Sound of Thunder was fun, even tho the over use of digital effects for the city and cars alone was bad.

Stealth was Knight Rider gone wrong in the air :)

But the Fall/Winter movie schedule is going to have some really fun films coming.

C
Cinenaut
post #15  on September 13, 2005 - 9:02 AM PDT  
You liked Sound of Thunder, but not Brothers Grimm!? If Ray Bradbury were dead, A Sound of Thunder would have him spinning in his grave!

Time waves, indeed.

The part that really annoyed me was when the guy talked about the Perseids being galaxies, not stars. They are stars! I know he was under the influence of Triffid venom, but still...
ALittlefield
post #16  on September 18, 2005 - 6:31 PM PDT  
> On September 10, 2005 - 7:27 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> The Constant Gardener was also directed by the fellow that directed City of God, so that would be enough to recommend it to me (and lots of other people), but I haven't seen it yet.


THE CONSTANT GARDENER is certainly a fine follow up to CITY OF GOD, but I don't think it's quite the knock out that the earlier film was. It's quite different in that Gardener is, at its heart, a love story that actually runs backward, while City was a full throttle, intense crime film that proved that poverty breeds violence everywhere. Still, go see THE CONSTANT GARDENER, which may turn out to be Ralph Fiennes third best picture winner(and maybe he'll finally pick an oscar himself this time).
underdog
post #17  on September 20, 2005 - 4:58 PM PDT  
Y'know, my expectations were pretty low after the fairly mixed/negative reviews around here and in general, for BROTHERS GRIMM. I finally saw it this weekend and actually enjoyed it more than I expected, though it's true it's a mess in places - it feels like the editing ended up choppy because, as usual, Gilliam had to make some cuts to shorten the running time, and I can only hope and assume that a future dvd release will feature cut scenes or a director's cut. There were choppy moments and threads and characters dropped, things not explained (I am still trying to figure out the logistics and mechanics of the Queen's curse), but I feel like Ehren Kruger's too solid a screenwriter for him to not have foreseen some of those things. Still, I enjoyed the set design, the humor, and plenty of moments within it...

I liked Jonathan Pryce's silly French General (and his foppish assistant), Peter Stormare's inspired turn as the semi-incomprehensible Italian torturer (a good character, too). I thought Heath Ledger's brother came off better than Matt Damon's, whether it was the characterization or acting I'm not quite sure. Both of those characters could have used a little more fleshing out (though that's rarely been Gilliam's strong suit). But some inspired moments throughout and overall, the film may be a little unfairly maligned.

A long way from Time Bandits and Brazil of course...

ALittlefield
post #18  on October 1, 2005 - 7:12 PM PDT  
I recently saw LORD OF WAR, which I found terrific! In many ways it's a companion piece to THE CONSTANT GARDERNER in that both of them are harsh critiques of capitalism and show Westerners exploiting the suffering of poor people in third world countries. And Nicholas Cage is excellent, playing an edgy, amoral character addicted to gunrunning not only for the money but also for the danger and sense of glamor it gives him. A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE, on the other hand, was a bit of a disappointment to me; well made and generally well acted (although Viggo Mortensen overdoes his character's enigmatic quality to the point of exasperation), but I wanted to know more about the central character, and its ending is odd and unsatisfying. It also becomes pretty conventional (and that's a surprise coming from Cronenburg)after an interesting start Still, not bad.
Cinenaut
post #19  on October 2, 2005 - 11:49 AM PDT  
Oh, I was wondering how good Lord of War was.

I saw Serenity yesterday, and it was a nice, juicy space opera. Joss Whedon milks the "girl-kicking-butt" thing a bit too much, but this movie is very witty and entertaining.
ALittlefield
post #20  on October 2, 2005 - 9:18 PM PDT  
> On October 2, 2005 - 11:49 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Oh, I was wondering how good Lord of War was.


Well, it's a box office dud, and the reviews have been mixed (as compared to the near unanamous praise for THE CONSTANT GARDENER)so if you don't like it...don't say I didn't warn you...
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