GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine Movie Talk
In The Theaters
I just saw it and boy does it...
318

Fall Movies!
Topic by: underdog
Posted: September 6, 2006 - 4:11 PM PDT
Last Reply: October 9, 2006 - 1:58 PM PDT

page  1  2      prev | next
author topic: Fall Movies!
underdog
post #1  on September 6, 2006 - 4:11 PM PDT  
Yay, Fall movie season is fast upon us, which means freedom from the Dog Days of August (no offense to myself), wherein we switch from the dumped sort of movie to many Award-seeking titles.

NPR had a story on the upcoming slate.

The SF Chronicle had more.

And so, too, did EW, Premiere, and many other sources.

Which films are you most looking forward to?

I was looking forward to Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain, but if you scanned our Daily blog recently you saw the report from Venice wasn't too kind to the film.

I was also looking forward to The Black Dahlia, as that was one of my favorite crime novels years ago - though I'm dubious about Josh Hartnett's presence in the film. (But he's not that bad - he's no Paul Walker, at any rate.)

hamano
post #2  on September 6, 2006 - 7:02 PM PDT  
> On September 6, 2006 - 4:11 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I was also looking forward to The Black Dahlia, as that was one of my favorite crime novels years ago

And Hollywoodland, too... Ah such nostalgia for those sleazy, dangerous days... now it's just sleazy.

Maybe years from now they'll have a movie called "The Cruise Baby"....

woozy
post #3  on September 7, 2006 - 9:38 AM PDT  
> On September 6, 2006 - 4:11 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> I was also looking forward to The Black Dahlia, as that was one of my favorite crime novels years ago -

Is the upcoming movie based on the novel by James Ellroy (which in turn was based on the actual murder)?
underdog
post #4  on September 7, 2006 - 10:39 AM PDT  
> On September 7, 2006 - 9:38 AM PDT woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On September 6, 2006 - 4:11 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> >
> > I was also looking forward to The Black Dahlia, as that was one of my favorite crime novels years ago -
>
> Is the upcoming movie based on the novel by James Ellroy (which in turn was based on the actual murder)?
> ---------------------------------


Yep! It will probably inevitably be compared to LA Confidential, and not as good, but I still look forward to it. The book was great.

And yep, Hamano, Hollywoodland looks intriguing too. Even Ben Affleck looks quite tolerable in that!

I'm a sucker for movies about Hollywood pre-1960.
woozy
post #5  on September 7, 2006 - 12:36 PM PDT  
> On September 7, 2006 - 10:39 AM PDT underdog wrote:
> Yep! It will probably inevitably be compared to LA Confidential, and not as good, but I still look forward to it. The book was great.
>
Cool. Haven't read the book. Without spoiling what's the book "about"? I mean, does it speculate a solution? Or is it a novel around the events without a solution? Is it fictional characters or is it a "historical novel" around real (or composite) characters as Hollywoodland is? Or a mixture?


> And yep, Hamano, Hollywoodland looks intriguing too. Even Ben Affleck looks quite tolerable in that!
>
I was intrigued by the NPR story and then the mentioned Ben Affleck and my heart sank. Then I realized how ironic that'd be if no-one can take the movie seriously because of Affleck type-casting.

(But on the other hand, think how tragic it would be that Reeve's couldn't escape type-casting but Affleck could. Or have movie audiences {and hollywood suits} changed? Are stars more versatile now? Or are audience just more complient?)
Cinenaut
post #6  on September 8, 2006 - 7:38 AM PDT  
Affleck is kind of perfect for that role. He's another strong-chinned guy who couldn't keep his career afloat.


I'm really looking forward to Alfonso Cuarón doing a sci-fi flick: Children of Men.
hamano
post #7  on September 8, 2006 - 7:43 AM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 7:38 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Affleck is kind of perfect for that role. He's another strong-chinned guy who couldn't keep his career afloat.

Kenneth Turan basically panned everything about Hollywoodland this morning on NPR, EXCEPT for Affleck's performance. He seemed to think that Affleck's personal career arc has added resonance to his performance or something.

> I'm really looking forward to Alfonso Cuarón doing a sci-fi flick:

What's his "best" film anyway? I've see two or three of his films and have found them to be only mildly interesting. At this point I would never use the phrases "looking forward" and "Alfonso Cuarón" in the same sentence...
Ursus
post #8  on September 8, 2006 - 8:25 AM PDT  
Ben Who-fleck!?

How does this man keep getting work!? He is the clingy turd that refuses to hit the bowl! You'd think with all the spare time he's had lately that he might take up a hobby... LIKE ACTING!!!

I too am anxious for The Black Dahlia (good book, but the history of the case, I think, is far more interesting); I also shall be see The Protector for reasons of pure action!
woozy
post #9  on September 8, 2006 - 9:55 AM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 7:43 AM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> What's his [Alfonso Cuarón's] "best" film anyway?

I would hazard to guess "y tu mama tambien" is his most critically acclaimed filmed.

Did you not care for it?

>>> I've see two or three of his films and have found them to be only mildly interesting. At this point I would never use the phrases "looking forward" and "Alfonso Cuarón" in the same sentence...


Other than the other three Harry Potter films were lightyears behind it, I can't claim "The prisoner of Azkaban" was terrific but it wasn't bad. I haven't seen any of his earlier films and I admit they don't seem impressive. Perhaps, "y tu mama" was a fluke.

(I really liked it, baaing sheep that I am. But perhaps others were less impressed and found it over-rated. I doubt those who did would find anything redemtive in his other films.)

"y tu mama tambien" was his "breakthrough hit" and I think is how he defined himself, so folks probably don't consider "the little princess" or "Great Expectations" when the think of him. Likewise, folks probably are forgiving of "Prisoner of Azkaban" ("it's impressive giving the limitations of mainstream hollywood") and as the first two Harry Potter movies were so unmittigatingly unimaginative it appears gold in comparison. So "PoA" probably doesn't factor as a mark against him in most people's mind. It doesn't in mind.

If "I'm really looking forward to Alfonso Cuarón doing a sci-fi flick" equals "I'm really looking forward to the director of 'y tu mama' doing a sci-fi flick", I can appreciate the sentence although perhaps I shouldn't when I realize it also equals "I'm really looking forward to the director of 'the prisoner of azkaban' do a sci-fi flick".

(Actually, the last paragraph would probably have more oomph if I had used "the little princess" rather than "PoA" but as I haven't seen "the little princess" that'd really only be a cheap shot.)

(The guy's exactly two weeks younger than I am. That's depressing. When the *heck* is my mid-life crisis gonna end.... )

> On September 8, 2006 - 8:25 AM PDT Ursus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> He is the clingy turd that refuses to hit the bowl!

Geez! Imagery, Ursus, imagery! I appreciate your passion but ... sheesh...

>
> I too am anxious for The Black Dahlia (good book, but the history of the case, I think, is far more interesting);


What's the book "about"? And, without spoilers, what do you think is interesting about the history of the case? (And what do you mean by "history of the case"? How the case was percieved and handled in subsequent years?)
kohnfused1
post #10  on September 8, 2006 - 10:22 AM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 8:25 AM PDT Ursus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I also shall be see The Protector for reasons of pure action!
> ---------------------------------

Have you seen the previews of Jet Li's "Fearless?" Look's like he's going for a big send off.

Best Buy had on their LCD, Plasma, etc...screens this past weekend.
Cinenaut
post #11  on September 8, 2006 - 11:00 AM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 7:43 AM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> What's his "best" film anyway? I've see two or three of his films and have found them to be only mildly interesting. At this point I would never use the phrases "looking forward" and "Alfonso Cuarón" in the same sentence...
> ---------------------------------

I thought A Little Princess was a fantastic children's film at the time, although I haven't seen it since it was in theaters. I haven't seen Great Expectations. Y tu mamá también was perhaps a bit overrated, perhaps due to many a film critic's joy at finding a movie with actual sex in it in these neo-puritanical times. The third Harry Potter film is perhaps the best of the bunch.

Why wouldn't I be looking forward to this movie? It's also got Chiwetel Ejiofor in it, who's always interesting, and it's based on a P.D. James novel.

hamano, don't you have an anime sub you should be watching right about now?




hamano
post #12  on September 8, 2006 - 11:56 AM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 11:00 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I thought A Little Princess was a fantastic children's film at the time, although I haven't seen it since it was in theaters.

Oh, I didn't know you were a 20 year old girl, Cinenaut! Sorry. Actually we own the DVD of this and it's quite decent, perhapse the best Cuaron film I've seen. But that's still not saying much. I thought the Agnieszka Holland adaptaion of The Secret Garden was much better, for example.

> Y tu mamá también was perhaps a bit overrated, perhaps due to many a film critic's joy at finding a movie with actual sex in it in these neo-puritanical times.

I thought that was a bit too much about a couple of big boobs, and I'm not talking about Diego Luna and Gael García Bernal. I was hoping for a little more than the Mexican version of a "bit better than average American teen sex comedy coming-of-age story" but that's all I got.

> The third Harry Potter film is perhaps the best of the bunch.

Yeah, if the "bunch" refers to all the Harry Potter films. But watching it was still like going on a Harry Potter theme park ride. I was again impressed how all this money and talent could get thrown into a project without adding a mote to the imagination evident in the original book.

> hamano, don't you have an anime sub you should be watching right about now?

I have this on laserdisc!
^_^
woozy
post #13  on September 8, 2006 - 12:21 PM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 11:56 AM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I was hoping for a little more than the Mexican version of a "bit better than average American teen sex comedy coming-of-age story" but that's all I got.
>
I thought it was brilliant. I thought it captured nuances of character and class, and the repercussions of impulses.


> > The third Harry Potter film is perhaps the best of the bunch.
>
> Yeah, if the "bunch" refers to all the Harry Potter films.

I think he was saying it was his favorite Cuaron film. Or maybe he meant it was the best Harry Potter film.

>>I was again impressed how all this money and talent could get thrown into a project without adding a mote to the imagination evident in the original book.
>

Oh, I dunno. I was disappointed in the film-- I expected better from the director of "y tu mama"-- but the under the blanket magic practising (reminescent of reading under the covers after bed-time) captured how alluring and tantalizing magic is and why Harry Potter actually likes it. Also it presented Hogwarts with a better sense of place than any of the other HP's. I especially liked Hagrid's pumpkin fields which really gave a sense of the comfort Harry and friends fealt in this humble rustic.

At any rate, I think there's enough in Cuaron's scales that I wouldn't claim surprise at someone looking forward to his doing a sci-fi movie.
Cinenaut
post #14  on September 8, 2006 - 1:36 PM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 11:56 AM PDT hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Oh, I didn't know you were a 20 year old girl, Cinenaut!
> ---------------------------------

...and that remark makes you sound like a 12 year old boy. It's no wonder the posts have dwindled on this message board.

What I remember particularly about Y Tu Mama Tambian is the cinematography of Emmanuel Lubezki, particularly in the swimming pool scene. The sky is reflected in a pool covered in fallen leaves, and it's just luminous. Lubezki worked on The New World, A Little Princess and also Children of Men.

I'd probably rank the Cuaron films I've seen with A Little Princess first, Y Tu Mama Tambien second and the Harry Potter film third. I haven't seen Great Expectations, but I think it was an interesting effort from all accounts.

Don't worry, if you want to skip Children of Men at the theater, I'm sure something more manly will be playing at the multiplex. You can go see Rocky Balboa.

Wow, along with Children of Men opening that weekend, Tom Twyker's Perfume and Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth will also be opening. This may be a good Fall at the movies.



woozy
post #15  on September 8, 2006 - 1:50 PM PDT  
> What I remember particularly about Y Tu Mama Tambian is the cinematography of Emmanuel Lubezki, particularly in the swimming pool scene. The sky is reflected in a pool covered in fallen leaves, and it's just luminous.

What I remember best was the homage to New Wave in the scene of the pigs on the beach. We see the activity of the pigs running and the ambient noise and then the ambient noise completely cuts for a narrator voice over describing where the pigs came from and what happens to them. The silence when the ambient noise cuts is deafening.

>> Lubezki worked on The New World,

a visually beautiful film, was it not.

>
> I'd probably rank the Cuaron films I've seen with A Little Princess first, Y Tu Mama Tambien second and the Harry Potter film third. I haven't seen Great Expectations, but I think it was an interesting effort from all accounts.
>
Hmm, should I rent "A Little Princess"? I hadn't realized until now it was directed by Cuaron. I just assumed it was one of those uninspiring Hallmark-prensentation-like here's-the-storyline-tossed-out-on-the-floor like suitcase of luggage films. Good cinematography is reason enough to see a film.

I love children's literature but I tend to dislike nearly all modern children's films because they are usually too cloying or utterly uninspir(ed/ing). (And then there's Tim Burton's "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" which is an entire different problem but I digress.) I take it, you figure "ALP" is neither?
hamano
post #16  on September 8, 2006 - 3:27 PM PDT  
> On September 8, 2006 - 1:36 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On September 8, 2006 - 11:56 AM PDT hamano wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Oh, I didn't know you were a 20 year old girl, Cinenaut!
> > ---------------------------------
>
> ...and that remark makes you sound like a 12 year old boy. It's no wonder the posts have dwindled on this message board.

Now we're both behaving like 12 year olds! Well, no harm in being "young at heart" I say.... but you seem a bit grumpy today.

As far as I'm concerned, Cuaron has about as much talent as Pedro Almodóvar has in his left big toe. I don't know why critics cut him so much slack...

Little Princess was a pretty good kids film, above average certainly in terms of production values and acting. I liked the bits where Sara was imagining her dad as Prince Rama from the Indian legends... very Bollywood. I thought Liam Cunningham, who played Captain Crewe, looked a lot like Victor Garber. I've only seen him in Dog Soldiers and maybe Prime Suspect on PBS. The adaptation of The Secret Garden, which I liked much better, also had scenes set in India. I guess Frances Hodgson Burnett had the Bollywood bug...
Cinenaut
post #17  on September 8, 2006 - 3:47 PM PDT  
Why, I do believe I AM grumpy.

So, what other cool Fall movies are coming out?

Danny Boyle's got his own science fiction effort coming out right quick: Sunshine.

I was disappointed to hear about the booing of The Fountain, but it did seem kind of over-ambitious. It's probably not quite as bad as they make out.

How about that other magician movie, Christopher Nolan's The Prestige? Is this sort of like volcano movies and Truman Capote movies? With David Bowie as Nikola Tesla. I do want to see The Illusionist.

Oh, and Emilio Estevez's Bobby. Go, Emilio!
Battie
post #18  on September 9, 2006 - 9:27 AM PDT  
Hmm...I'm exicited about Children of Men and Pan's Labyrinth myself. :P Sunshine might be good too, if it doesn't go for cheesey or melodramatic.

Supposedly there's supposed to be a good movie found in Flyboys, with a completely unknown cast. But I'm not really up for anything "patriotic." Even if it is pretty.

Little Children is based on a book about suburban parents who can't seem to claim responsibility as they should, and the consequences thereof. Might be interesting for laughs. :P

Right now though, I want to see, God help me, Idlewild. I've totally lost my mind with that one. Stupid tv trailers...And one day, I'll see Hard Candy. Sounds good 'n' creepy.

Parker Posey has a new one - The OH in Ohio. :D
Battie
post #19  on September 9, 2006 - 9:34 AM PDT  
Oh, forgot to mention that they're making a sequel to 28 Days Later. I know everyone likes to pan a sequel (and often they're right), but I can't wait for it. Some folks thought the movie sucked, I thought it was amazing. :P
Cinenaut
post #20  on September 11, 2006 - 11:52 AM PDT  
Scorsese's The Departed comes out next month. That's the remake of Infernal Affairs.

> On September 9, 2006 - 9:34 AM PDT Battie wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Oh, forgot to mention that they're making a sequel to 28 Days Later. I know everyone likes to pan a sequel (and often they're right), but I can't wait for it. Some folks thought the movie sucked, I thought it was amazing. :P
> ---------------------------------

I'm in, as long as Danny Boyle is directing. Oh wait, he's just producing it, the guy who directed Intacto is directing 28 Weeks Later.... I'm still in!
page  1  2      prev | next

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.