GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine General
Feedback
Have suggestions, criticism or praise for the GreenCine community? Post them here. Please maintain a sense of decorum here.
1063

Seriously, something needs to be done about the Color Code System!
Topic by: Silencio
Posted: September 13, 2011 - 1:55 PM PDT
Last Reply: January 12, 2012 - 11:17 AM PST

page  1  2      prev | next
author topic: Seriously, something needs to be done about the Color Code System!
Silencio
post #1  on September 13, 2011 - 1:55 PM PDT  
This has reached the point of absurdity

It used to be that you would select a film and the Color Code would be Blue, Yellow, Orange or Red and then it would sit at that status for YEARS! YEARS! This is no exaggeration. I have hundreds of films on my queue that have not changed status in over 5 years!

This is unacceptable.

And now, Greencine has resorted to releasing films, brand new films as RED!!!

For a service where people are playing over $300+/year, this is not acceptable.

Do you ever do inventory? Do you just not care?

Do NOT blame your technology. It's been so many years that this has become systematic disrespect of your customer base.

What are the steps Greencine is taking to fix this situation?

Silencio
post #2  on September 13, 2011 - 1:57 PM PDT  
PS -- I have made threads similar to this in the past. Occasionally, they have been deleted.

Here's a screenshot of this thread -- http://i51.tinypic.com/nged7a.png

Time stamped

The Greencine customer base anxiously awaits your answer
Cinenaut
post #3  on September 14, 2011 - 8:47 AM PDT  
Conversely, I've got a couple of movies in my queue that are green but don't seem to be available: "Through a Glass Darkly (Criterion Collection) (1961)" and "Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010)."
weezy
post #4  on September 14, 2011 - 4:13 PM PDT  
Hi Silencio, sorry to hear your feelings about the color coding system. It's not an exact science, so the best way to figure out the status of titles you're not sure about is to fire an email to customer support. We do inventory checks every few months and look at updated inventory counts every day.

New films usually only show RED when we haven't gotten them in from the distributor yet, but once they're in stock they're usually yellow or orange because of the high demand for new titles. We'll take a look at the color bar system to see if there's anything we can improve.

We understand your frustration so we do highly encourage you to email us with the titles you're looking for.
Silencio
post #5  on September 15, 2011 - 11:45 AM PDT  
> On September 14, 2011 - 4:13 PM PDT weezy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Hi Silencio, sorry to hear your feelings about the color coding system. It's not an exact science, so the best way to figure out the status of titles you're not sure about is to fire an email to customer support. We do inventory checks every few months and look at updated inventory counts every day.
>
> New films usually only show RED when we haven't gotten them in from the distributor yet, but once they're in stock they're usually yellow or orange because of the high demand for new titles. We'll take a look at the color bar system to see if there's anything we can improve.
>
> We understand your frustration so we do highly encourage you to email us with the titles you're looking for.
> ---------------------------------

If emailing support is the best, I'll do that.

I've emailed before to little avail, other than the advice to "more more green movies to the front of my queue".

The issue is less that and more things such as "The Celebration (1998)" which has been yellow on my list for about 4 years now (Currently at #33 but has been up further over the years) and "Tales from the Gimli Hospital (1988)" which has been a constant orange.

I am also assuming that many "reds" are simply lost/broken/on order, such as Schlock (1973) and The Monster (1994) which have been on my list since I joined back in...'03? '04?

I've always been a strong proponent of Greencine and have argued for it above the competitors saying the extra price point was worth it due to the vast library of films which you can't find elsewhere. But after all this time, I am starting question whether having the ability to put Taxi Zum Klo (1981) or Ilsa: She Wolf of the SS (1974) or Coffy (1973) or Idlewild (2006) or Dracula (1979) or Black Dynamite (2009) or any other film already mentioned or many other films makes a difference if it seems that I'll never receive them anyway.

I'll reach out to support via email again.
Silencio
post #6  on September 21, 2011 - 12:42 PM PDT  
well, I received an unhelpful response from support

I clearly stated that I was not interested in the advice of Move More Green Titles Up On Your List, but that was their suggestion.

It also seems this system is extremely flawed. For example, many of these Yellow, Orange, Blue and Red titles are sitting on the shelves. The system puts people in order based on who requests a movie first. That said, someone could request a movie first and have it way down their queue. So there are plenty of Yellow, Orange, etc titles sitting on the shelves collecting dust waiting for the person who requested it first to have that movie high on their queue. It could be languishing at #250, but it will sit on the shelf until that user watches 249 other films.

The system is flawed. This issue needs to be addressed.
ninex
post #7  on September 28, 2011 - 4:27 PM PDT  
I do hope that the movies are not sitting on the self. Now that my queue has no green titles left I have not been sent all three dvds in a while. Currently all three of my slots are unfilled and I have 48 titles in my queue. For the longest empty slot it has been unfilled since the 16th.
FGaipa
post #8  on September 29, 2011 - 10:39 AM PDT  
> On September 21, 2011 - 12:42 PM PDT Silencio wrote:

> The system is flawed. This issue needs to be addressed.
> ---------------------------------

Now, when NF is threatening to bail on some indies (http://www.indiewire.com/article/the_death_of_indies_on_netflix_greatly_exaggerated_or_just_another_mistake/ and below), should be the time for GC to expand its collection to grab market share. GC should buy sufficient copies of every item NF passes over. Instead, GC continues to act as if it's about to go belly up.

fg

The Decline of Indies on Netflix: Were They Amputated With the Long Tail?
by Anthony Kaufman
http://www.indiewire.com/article/the_death_of_indies_on_netflix_greatly_exaggerated_or_just_another_mistake/

Netflix was founded on the principle that it provided access to moviesall movies, including the most obscure indie titles. By promising to sell less of more, it was a new-economy poster child, a publicly traded argument for the long tail.

Today, it looks like Netflix is docking its tail with a more old-fashioned strategy: Give (most of) the people (most of) what they want.
And while Netflixand some of its suppliersare quick to defend the companys indie stance, its clear some smaller players are being pushed aside.

According to indie filmmakers and distributors, the shift began a year or two ago when Netflix changed their buying metric  the measure of how many DVD titles they purchase on individual films. One distributor says the company used to take smaller-title DVDs in relatively modest orders of 30-60 units, whereas theyre now focused on reordering only titles that can sustain hundreds of units. (Netflix corporate communications VP Steve Swasey wont comment on the number of DVDs the company orders.)

Before, they would buy inventory for rental stock and then reorder if the title gained traction, says Facets Multimedias executive director Milos Stehlik. Now they skip over many, if not most titles.

Stehlik says Netflix interest on smaller titles was piqued only if enough people put them into their queue. He notes that he recently received a reorder for Bela Tarrs Werckmeister Harmonies, based on demand. However, he points out that for other films, the queue represents a self-defeating spiral, since most independent films cant get the kind of public traction to get noticed in the marketplace.

The metric had a devastating impact on microdistributor Carnivalesque Films. Operated by filmmaker-distributors David Redmon and Ashley Sabin (Mardis Gras: Made in China), Carnivalesque is closing its doors next month, in part, as a result of the new Netflix model.

When they couldnt commit to buying our films anymore, that really cut out a big chunk of money, he says. Redmon noticed a sharp change in tactics after Netflixs indie film buyer, Mike Grice, was let go last year.

Post-Grice, Redmon says, there was far less transparency from Netflix about how many queue adds were necessary to make a physical DVD order. Every month, wed email Netflix and ask, How much more do we need in peoples queues? and theyd always say, Its not there yet, but well let you know when it is.

Factory 25 founder Matt Grady says hes seen several of his companys films fade away on Netflix because they did not meet the new metrics requirements, including critically acclaimed dance film NY Export: Opus Jazz.

Other Factory 25 docs, such as You Werent There: A History of Chicago Punk and All the Way from Michigan Not Mars had been available as DVDs in the past, but are now no longer part of the service. They said demand wasnt high enough, says Grady.

Netflix strongly defends the companys indie cred. Netflix acquires content that we know that is going to have an audience, Swasey says. We dont buy everything out there, because it would not be cost effective. But most independent films do have a following.

But how is a following measured in Netflixs streaming universe? Netflix confirms that it no longer uses the queue as a demand yardstick for streaming titles. (And as a customer, your streaming queue doesnt save or make note of unfulfilled requests.) However, Netflix wont say how it determines which titles are worthy of streaming. Says Swasey, We have different metrics for streaming, but we dont disclose them.

According to distributors we spoke to, streaming agreements were either based on box-office returns or output deals with aggregators. (Redmon bowed out of a streaming deal with Netflix because he did not want to work with a larger aggregator.)

However, Swaseys strongest argument for Netflixs indie commitment is economic. Since Netflix cant afford to buy first-window streaming rights on the biggest new releases, Netflix will do what its always done: Use its recommendation engine to push the product (some of it indie) they do have.

Independent filmmakers have a haven with Netflix, he says.

However, theres also an economic argument for Netflix being more selective about its streaming product: DVD shelf space is cheaper than streaming server costs.

If you have two filmsone that is hot and streams constantly and another that sits there on the server waiting to be calledyoull move the catalog title off the server and substitute it for something else, says IndiePix president Bob Alexander. Does that happen? All the time. We had a number of titles that did not get renewed.

Alexander also says licensing fees on streaming deals hes recently closed do not reflect the incredible growth in [Netflixs] subscriber platform since last July. Alexander pegs those fees as being at the low end of cable licenses  or about 1 cent per viewer over the first year of the license.

?He believes that as Netflix grows, it will give way to more episodic television programming because thats what the audience wants. Netflix doesnt need indie film today, he says.

However, Netflixs commitment to indie film may be all about how you define the term. Theres little doubt that smaller titles, with less demand, have been pushed off the service. But longstanding indie companies with catalogs and established track records have only good things to say about the company as it transforms.

Netflix is still a good partner, says Music Box Films William Schopf, whose company has an output deal for streaming rights. They have a specific subscriber base that likes foreign and arthouse cinema.

Kino Lorbers Richard Lorber says hes seen a growth in the licensing fees and number of units hes sending to Netflix and believes it will continue providing a breadth of titles. Thats going to remain their key differentiator, helping expand audiences with titles not widely available elsewhere, he says.

Erick Opeka, VP of VOD and digital distribution at New Video, the largest aggregator of indie films in North America, has also seen a considerable increase in the number of titles taken in 2011, despite the bigger deals announced with networks and studios, he says. We anticipate this trend to continue into 2012.

Theres also Netflixs recent partnership with the Sundance Institutes Artist Services Distribution initiative, which gives undistributed films from the festival  such as Tiffany Shlains Connected, and Andrew Okpeaha Macleans On the Ice  access to Netflixs 25 million users. To me, that speaks volumes about their commitment to the space, says Opeka.

Others remain skeptical.

In a guest column for the Chicago Tribune, Facets Stehlik wrote, I doubt any large commercial enterprise with a goal of serving the millions has the nurturing of these little films at its heart.

Up until a few months ago, filmmaker Michael Tully says his music doc Silver Jew was available to rent by mail on Netflix; now, its not. Likewise, his 2006 indie drug drama Cocaine Angel was available for both disc and streaming, but when the streaming rights ran out, Netflix dropped the title. He likens the companys indie commitment to the pretty girl in class that you think might actually like you, until you realize she just wanted to borrow your Sharpie.

But its Redmon who perhaps best reflects the sentiment among many indie filmmakers about Netflixs long tail strategy going forward. Suddenly, I guess that tail was cut off, he says, because we were at the end of it.
Blumphf
post #9  on October 8, 2011 - 8:47 AM PDT  
Silencio, I feel your pain...

I responded in another thread you started (of 3/11/11) about this very problem. That was six months ago, and in that time, I think of about 150 red/orange/yellow/blue titles on my queue, a whopping number of 5 of them changed to green! Of course, when i saw this I immediately bumped them to #1 on my request list...and sometimes this didn't even work because in a day or so two of them changed back again to a color other than green!

I like GreenCine, they have a lot of films in their catalog that NF doesn't, and that's what keeps me a member here. But I've been a member (off and on) for about 3 years now, and I'm sure there is going to come a day when the number of green titles sitting on my queue will vanish, and everything will be non-green. When that happens, I'll have no choice but to suspend my membership until things change vis-a-vis availablity of titles. (Another reason is because Greencine is on the opposite side of the country from me, and I really have to use NF as my main rental site simply because their turnaround for discs is 1-2 days, whereas GC can take up to 7!).

Anyway, I just wanted to put my 2cents in about the "Color Availability" system, and how it really needs an overhaul. Do they even use a barcode tracking system here? It's so inefficient I wonder if someone enters the In/Out data for discs manually! Or perhaps "doesn't" enter, if that's the case.

To restate from my previous post in the 3/11 thread... If a title has a "blue" bar, meaning availability will be SOON, you shouldn't have to wait MONTHS or YEARS! to receive it! That should be a matter of weeks, at most. It's Greencine's own criteria, I just wish they'd respect it and the customers here by sticking to it.

Silencio
post #10  on October 17, 2011 - 4:48 PM PDT  
Great post, Blumphf

The system s BROKEN.

I went through my Inbox because something was funny about Supports response to my complaint. Turns out it was a verbatim Copy & Paste response that they had sent me a few years ago.

Here's the response:

So here is how it works:

The color bar is an estimation based on how many copies we have when compared with demand. Then there is what we call a ‚¨Smaster queue‚¨ for each title, which everyone who picks the movie (let‚¨"s just say for example King Kong) gets inserted into. If ten people total have selected King Kong, and I was the 6th person to select it and place it in my queue, I would receive a copy after all 5 ahead of me have received theirs. This sounds simple, but when you take into account customers damaging and losing discs, and more often keeping them for extended periods of time, the wait periods can get a little skewed. Also, if I am 1st in line to get King Kong, but I also have other titles above it in my queue (say King Kong is 5th, and my top 4 are green), then I will be shipped the highest ranked available movie. The system examines the first 100 titles in queue, so what I‚¨"d recommend is keeping low availability titles at the top (closer to 1) and leaving a lot of green titles within the 1-100 range. That way, when you are up to get that super rare Kurosawa flick, you have it higher up, and are thus shipped the rare movie, instead of the green title below it. Anything else I can help with?

Best Wishes,

------------

I have major issues with this beyond the complete lack of care by Greencine to not even respond to my actual email.

1 - If this is true, then how do titles which are Green suddenly become Orange or Blue??

2 - How does it make sense that I have to wait for everyone else who has previously requested a certain film to receive it before me. What if each of those people has the film at #50? That would mean I would have to wait YEARS for my turn?


Why doesn't anyone fix this broken system?? There are multiple people in this thread who are paying Greencine and Greencine is doing nothing other than sending canned responses of "Well, pick more Green films!" That is not a solution!

Someone, please address this!
Moonscream
post #11  on November 12, 2011 - 8:18 PM PST  
> 2 - How does it make sense that I have to wait for everyone else who has previously requested a certain film to receive it before me. What if each of those people has the film at #50? That would mean I would have to wait YEARS for my turn?
>
So...then people like myself who have a few hundred movies in their queue because they read each newsletter and go 'oh, I'd like to see that!' end up screwing over other members unintentionally?!

#%@$!!

I'm sorry! I thought the system was geared toward 'who has it nearest the top', THEN 'who ordered first' in the event of a tie (i.e. several people having put it at #1)! &%$^!!

On the other hand it does explain why 20 of my top picks haven't moved FOR YEARS. I end up renting them from elsewhere or borrowing them from the library and deleting them from my queue.
Moonscream
post #12  on November 15, 2011 - 2:19 PM PST  
Just FYI, I had 531 in my queue this morning, but its now only 172, mostly collections and movies I cannot get elsewhere. I will probably drop more later as I re-evaluate my interest in what's left.

--Moony
ninex
post #13  on November 16, 2011 - 10:25 AM PST  
> On October 17, 2011 - 4:48 PM PDT Silencio wrote:
> So here is how it works:
>
> The color bar is an estimation based on how many copies we have when compared with demand. Then there is what we call a ‚¨Smaster queue‚¨ for each title, which everyone who picks the movie (let‚¨"s just say for example King Kong) gets inserted into. If ten people total have selected King Kong, and I was the 6th person to select it and place it in my queue, I would receive a copy after all 5 ahead of me have received theirs. This sounds simple, but when you take into account customers damaging and losing discs, and more often keeping them for extended periods of time, the wait periods can get a little skewed. Also, if I am 1st in line to get King Kong, but I also have other titles above it in my queue (say King Kong is 5th, and my top 4 are green), then I will be shipped the highest ranked available movie. The system examines the first 100 titles in queue, so what I‚¨"d recommend is keeping low availability titles at the top (closer to 1) and leaving a lot of green titles within the 1-100 range. That way, when you are up to get that super rare Kurosawa flick, you have it higher up, and are thus shipped the rare movie, instead of the green title below it. Anything else I can help with?
>

If this is still how it is setup, the system needs to change. To be more efficient with the disks and to better fulfill the requests from the members the system should rank delivery by;
-Who has it listed at #1
-How long has the title been at position #1, so people don't get skipped over
-If tied or close to another member for receipt of the title, the member with the shorter average turn around should receive it first, that way the dvd will more likely make it back sooner and then be given to a person who may hold onto it longer.
Cinenaut
post #14  on November 18, 2011 - 8:55 AM PST  
I guess the best strategy is to just put stuff you want to see near the top of your queue, but it would be nice to be able to plan better.
Silencio
post #15  on November 28, 2011 - 4:56 PM PST  
> On November 12, 2011 - 8:18 PM PST Moonscream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > 2 - How does it make sense that I have to wait for everyone else who has previously requested a certain film to receive it before me. What if each of those people has the film at #50? That would mean I would have to wait YEARS for my turn?
> >
> So...then people like myself who have a few hundred movies in their queue because they read each newsletter and go 'oh, I'd like to see that!' end up screwing over other members unintentionally?!
>
> #%@$!!
>
> I'm sorry! I thought the system was geared toward 'who has it nearest the top', THEN 'who ordered first' in the event of a tie (i.e. several people having put it at #1)! &%$^!!
>
> On the other hand it does explain why 20 of my top picks haven't moved FOR YEARS. I end up renting them from elsewhere or borrowing them from the library and deleting them from my queue.
> ---------------------------------

it makes no sense to have a color coding system, in fact.

What it should show is a #, the # you are in line for a movie. If you're not in a Top 10 position, you might as well delete from the list as this service will never effectively get you your film.

Fix this please!!!
kaream
post #16  on December 12, 2011 - 9:53 PM PST  
> On September 21, 2011 - 12:42 PM PDT Silencio wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> well, I received an unhelpful response from support
>
> I clearly stated that I was not interested in the advice of Move More Green Titles Up On Your List, but that was their suggestion.
>
> It also seems this system is extremely flawed. For example, many of these Yellow, Orange, Blue and Red titles are sitting on the shelves. The system puts people in order based on who requests a movie first. That said, someone could request a movie first and have it way down their queue. So there are plenty of Yellow, Orange, etc titles sitting on the shelves collecting dust waiting for the person who requested it first to have that movie high on their queue. It could be languishing at #250, but it will sit on the shelf until that user watches 249 other films.
>
> The system is flawed. This issue needs to be addressed.
> ---------------------------------

I may very well be wrong, but this is not my understanding of how the system is supposed to work (whether it actually does or not). I can't find the reply now, but a few years ago - and I don't want to misquote him - underdog told me that GC will look at my top queue position, and if they have that title available they'll send it to me. Failing to fill my top slot, they then look down to my second position, and on down, etc. (I hope I'm getting this right.)

Now suppose a number of people have the same title at the top of their queues, and GC has a single copy ready to ship out. Since they're looking at everyone's top position, they will send the movie to whoever has had that title not just anywhere in their queue, but in the top position for the longest time.

Then they proceed to everyone's #2 slot, etc, and repeat the process.

Weezy, or underdog, please chime in here and let us know whether I got this right or not - thanks.
kaream
post #17  on December 12, 2011 - 10:31 PM PST  
> On November 16, 2011 - 10:25 AM PST ninex wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> -If tied or close to another member for receipt of the title, the member with the shorter average turn around should receive it first, that way the dvd will more likely make it back sooner and then be given to a person who may hold onto it longer.
> ---------------------------------

I certainly agree with this sentiment, but I'm afraid it doesn't work that way. We all know there are subscribers who just have considerably less anxiety about keeping their queues moving than we, who post on these boards, do. Somebody who will say, Hm - I'm not really in the mood for watching this movie now; I'll get around to it later. Or, Hm - this would be great for the whole family to watch together, so let's wait for Susie when she comes next Thanksgiving.

The essential problem is that these are GC's best customers. No mailing expenses, no care and feeding required; just a steady stream of monthly subscription fees. We are the ones, with our quick turnarounds, who cost them more money.

I've suggested before that perhaps GC could send out a very polite reminder when a disc has been out for a month or more; but the answer was, Nope, we don't do that.


And that also raises another point about inventory and color bars. I could be mistaken, but I'd be willing to bet that colors are based on the number of copies GC considers to be "in play", including the ones that have been out for perhaps years, as opposed to what's actually on hand plus what can reasonably be assumed to become available very soon. I'd guess that "inventory" includes all copies that have not specifically been reported lost or damaged beyond repair.
kaream
post #18  on December 12, 2011 - 11:06 PM PST  
OK, here at topic: O.k. people, time to return your dvds, post #62 on July 11, 2008:

--"Greencine should be able to us where we are in line."

--"Something like this would certainly be useful, but it's hard to imagine how it would actually work. As I understand it, there is no 'line' that we're in for any given title.

"It's been explained in a different thread that what counts is where a title is within your own queue. When you return a disc and thus free up a slot, the GC computer looks only at your #1 queue position to see first whether a copy is available in the warehouse, and next to see what other members also have that same title in their #1 slot, and only then does it check to see which member had requested it earliest. If you're first in line for the #1 slot it will send the movie to you; otherwise it moves down to your #2 request and repeats the process.

"Then you have the problem that many people keep rearranging their queues -- or at least I do, and I suppose many others do as well.

"So although it would seem straightforward for GC to be able to tell you how far down you are for a red-barred title that's been sitting in your #1 position for months on end, it actually depends entirely not on how many people requested the same movie before you, but rather on which of these people also have that title at the very top of their queues on the day it's returned and checked in."
Larry
post #19  on December 13, 2011 - 7:59 AM PST  
I haven't been a member for very long, about a year now I think. I actually did receive a red-colored movie finally, "Meet The Feebles", which had been in my queue since I first joined. I watched and returned it, no problem, but now the next rental after it, "Shanghai Express", never showed up. I've never had that problem before, so I'm guessing it has to do with what other members are saying about the new labels and new processing center...
kaream
post #20  on December 13, 2011 - 11:02 AM PST  
> On November 18, 2011 - 8:55 AM PST Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I guess the best strategy is to just put stuff you want to see near the top of your queue, but it would be nice to be able to plan better.
> ---------------------------------

Yes, this is what both underdog and weezy have been saying all along - that stacking all the red titles up at the top of your queue is actually a very poor strategy for getting the ones you're most anxious to see, because of the way the computer assigns priority. That instead it's much better to disregard the color bars, and arrange your queue according to what films are most important to you, and then to leave the top 10 or so titles alone without rearranging them, which makes them lose their place in "line" by date in that position.


Larry, again I may be wrong, but as I understand the situation, it's the shipping center that was moved from Van Nuys, where USPS there had been the cause of all the delays going in both directions. When discs actually get to where they are supposed to be going, in either direction, the new shipping center is much more efficient in speeding them along than Van Nuys ever was.

The problem now is that the flimsiness of the mailers gets them torn up, and all the movies that you never receive, or that GC never receives back from you, are ending up as undeliverable "dead letters". So no, it is not "the new labels and new processing center", but just the inappropriate weight of the paper used for the new mailers. GC must be experiencing a much larger rate than usual of lost discs, because of the mailers getting shredded.
page  1  2      prev | next

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.