GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine General
Feedback
Have suggestions, criticism or praise for the GreenCine community? Post them here. Please maintain a sense of decorum here.
1063

Is GC still buying new releases?
Topic by: kaream
Posted: June 14, 2013 - 1:39 PM PDT
Last Reply: July 6, 2013 - 10:18 PM PDT

author topic: Is GC still buying new releases?
kaream
post #1  on June 14, 2013 - 1:39 PM PDT  
Unlike many subscribers, I almost never look at GC's new releases. But I wonder why 20th Century's new re-release of Viva Zapata! is still not listed here. I'm sure there would be a significant demand for it.
FGaipa
post #2  on June 15, 2013 - 8:55 AM PDT  
> On June 14, 2013 - 1:39 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Unlike many subscribers, I almost never look at GC's new releases. But I wonder why 20th Century's new re-release of Viva Zapata! is still not listed here. I'm sure there would be a significant demand for it.
> ---------------------------------

If you're a reader, I strongly recommend the Steinbeck's Zapata (Penguin Books) with a detailed treatment of the film Steinbeck wanted made. I read it before seeing the film, but either way...

fg
kaream
post #3  on June 15, 2013 - 1:22 PM PDT  
Thanks for the reference - I hadn't been aware of this book.

I suppose there's always some conflict between the visions of the original writer, and of the director who must translate a story to a visual medium. Still, Elia Kazan was one of the most important directors of the mid-20th century. In a sense he succeeded in pulling off a delicate balancing act between giving free reign to his own sense of social justice, and addressing issues that audiences preferred not to think about in the postwar period when Americans were retreating into middle-class complacency on the one hand and fear of communism on the other - while making challenging movies that were still box-office hits and Academy winners. A very tricky balance. Not all of his movies were entirely successful, artistically, or commercially; but they're all well worth seeing.

GreenCine lists what appears to be everything of his that had been available on DVD up until recently (but I didn't check their color bars, which are now meaningless anyway). Viva Zapata had been out of print for years, and was just re-released last month. Netflix has it now of course; and I thought GC would be jumping on it for their subscribers. Since they haven't, that's why I wondered whether they're buying anything new at all.
FGaipa
post #4  on June 17, 2013 - 6:30 AM PDT  
They're adding Marketa Lazarova (Criterion) on July 18, so I guess they are still buying new releases.

fg

> On June 15, 2013 - 1:22 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Thanks for the reference - I hadn't been aware of this book.
>
> I suppose there's always some conflict between the visions of the original writer, and of the director who must translate a story to a visual medium. Still, Elia Kazan was one of the most important directors of the mid-20th century. In a sense he succeeded in pulling off a delicate balancing act between giving free reign to his own sense of social justice, and addressing issues that audiences preferred not to think about in the postwar period when Americans were retreating into middle-class complacency on the one hand and fear of communism on the other - while making challenging movies that were still box-office hits and Academy winners. A very tricky balance. Not all of his movies were entirely successful, artistically, or commercially; but they're all well worth seeing.
>
> GreenCine lists what appears to be everything of his that had been available on DVD up until recently (but I didn't check their color bars, which are now meaningless anyway). Viva Zapata had been out of print for years, and was just re-released last month. Netflix has it now of course; and I thought GC would be jumping on it for their subscribers. Since they haven't, that's why I wondered whether they're buying anything new at all.
> ---------------------------------

kaream
post #5  on June 17, 2013 - 11:53 AM PDT  
Well, who knows what GC decides to buy, or forgo? Viva Zapata would have seemed an obvious pickup to me.

By the way, this new release is an authentic 20th Century Fox reissue, with new subtitles added; but it's clearly taken from video, so I guess Fox no longer has a usable master copy of it - that must be why it's been unavailable for so long. But still quite acceptable for watching.

And it's an impressive movie. What I didn't say, in mentioning the vision of the original author as opposed to the director's translation to film, is that in fact under the old studio system both writer and director were constrained by the studio and whatever rewrites or editing cuts might have been demanded. Does Steinbeck discuss this aspect at all in his book, or does he just complain about Kazan?

(I wish GC allowed editing of posts - of course I meant rein, not reign in my post that you copied here.)
kaream
post #6  on June 17, 2013 - 1:12 PM PDT  
> On June 17, 2013 - 6:30 AM PDT FGaipa wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> They're adding Marketa Lazarova (Criterion) on July 18, so I guess they are still buying new releases.
>
> fg
> > ---------------------------------

Good luck getting it. Unlike Netflix, GreenCine does buy Criterions, but apparently only a single copy for their entire membership. I just added Eclipse Series 38: Masaki Kobayashi Against the System to my queue here (NF doesn't even list it as a "Save" for later availability), and it came up nearly all red-barred. I'm tired of fighting both of these so-called rental services, and have to consider just buying the damn thing from Amazon at roughly half price. For what I've been paying GC every month and receiving zilch, I would have been better off just going to Amazon to start with.

What's so infuriating about GreenCine is their buying lots of junk, on the one hand, and on the other, their penny-wise-pound-foolish insistence on using crappy mailers and losing all of their important movies.
FGaipa
post #7  on June 19, 2013 - 6:54 AM PDT  
I made a telephone complaint to NF about their ignoring most Criterion and all or nearly all Eclipse Series. This was some time ago.

Went ahead and bought Series 38 because I've wanted to re-see The Inheritance for a something like two decades. In my memory it's like Kobayashi doing Antonioni. Anyway, at, if I recall, $25 plus 3.99 postage, it roughly equals four movie tickets plus transportation. SF's Silent Film Festival, for instance, charges $15 per film to nonmembers, though the Pacific Film Archive where I saw The Inheritance is more reasonable even today.

fg

> On June 17, 2013 - 1:12 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On June 17, 2013 - 6:30 AM PDT FGaipa wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > They're adding Marketa Lazarova (Criterion) on July 18, so I guess they are still buying new releases.
> >
> > fg
> > > ---------------------------------
>
> Good luck getting it. Unlike Netflix, GreenCine does buy Criterions, but apparently only a single copy for their entire membership. I just added Eclipse Series 38: Masaki Kobayashi Against the System to my queue here (NF doesn't even list it as a "Save" for later availability), and it came up nearly all red-barred. I'm tired of fighting both of these so-called rental services, and have to consider just buying the damn thing from Amazon at roughly half price. For what I've been paying GC every month and receiving zilch, I would have been better off just going to Amazon to start with.
>
> What's so infuriating about GreenCine is their buying lots of junk, on the one hand, and on the other, their penny-wise-pound-foolish insistence on using crappy mailers and losing all of their important movies.
> ---------------------------------

kaream
post #8  on June 19, 2013 - 1:55 PM PDT  
> On June 19, 2013 - 6:54 AM PDT FGaipa wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I made a telephone complaint to NF about their ignoring most Criterion and all or nearly all Eclipse Series. This was some time ago.
> ---------------------------------

I'm sure you know how much good a telephone complaint will do with that outfit. People screamed and yelled, first when they eliminated being able to compare queues with your friends, and then even more when they anonymized everyone's reviews. They do whatever they damn well want to.

I've seen a few hopeful souls posting "please please please put this movie in your queue," assuming that if enough people request it, NF just might buy some copies. I wonder if that might actually work.

They do carry a lot of weird stuff other than the obvious blockbusters that 90% of their subscribers will want, so I'm not sure what the problem is with Criterion and Eclipse, other than maybe they can't work out a steep discount deal with them. Come to think of it, it just might be more useful to try phoning Criterion and ask them. They're obviously discounting heavily with Amazon, but maybe won't come down enough to satisfy NF. Or, maybe Amazon is taking a loss on them - they definitely do that with some books, very controversially.

kaream
post #9  on June 25, 2013 - 1:41 PM PDT  
> On June 19, 2013 - 6:54 AM PDT FGaipa wrote:
> ---------------------------------

> Went ahead and bought Series 38 because I've wanted to re-see The Inheritance for a something like two decades. In my memory it's like Kobayashi doing Antonioni. Anyway, at, if I recall, $25 plus 3.99 postage, it roughly equals four movie tickets plus transportation. SF's Silent Film Festival, for instance, charges $15 per film to nonmembers, though the Pacific Film Archive where I saw The Inheritance is more reasonable even today.
>
> fg
> > > > ---------------------------------


I've decided to follow your lead on buying this Kobayashi set. As much as I hate to spend the money to buy DVDs, when 1) it seems pretty clear that I'm never going to be able to get hold of a copy of important films that I'm really interested in watching, either from GreenCine, Netflix, CafeDVD, or my local public library, and 2) I can find a movie priced at roughly the same cost as a month's 1-out rental subscription, I start to figure, Why not?

I tend to buy used discs from Amazon marketplace sellers when there's a significant savings (after all, rental copies epitomize "used", and a defective disc purchased can always be returned for full credit - I pay more attention to a seller's feedback rating, and check their negatives for poor or unresponsive service). It's also frequently worthwhile checking Amazon's foreign websites. For instance amazon.co.uk has what appears to be an essentially complete series of Theo Angelopoulos, from 1970's "Reconstruction" up through his 2008 "The Dust of Time", all very reasonably priced. Of course these are all R2 PAL format, but region-breaking software is cheap and widely available; I use Slysoft's AnyDVD. And if I want to watch on a freestanding player and TV instead of my computer, making a personal copy will play on any machine.



kaream
post #10  on July 6, 2013 - 10:18 PM PDT  
Oops - Artificial Eye's UK releases of Angelopoulos are actually region-free, not R2. But they are PAL rather than NTSC, so compatibility will still depend on your player.

about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.