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Discuss all topics related to anime.
561

New Fansubs!
Topic by: Battie
Posted: October 11, 2005 - 5:35 PM PDT
Last Reply: October 14, 2006 - 4:25 AM PDT

page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  >>      prev | next
author topic: New Fansubs!
Battie
post #181  on February 14, 2006 - 9:33 AM PST  
> On February 13, 2006 - 3:29 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I saw it. I was pretty lukewarm to it after watching it twice. The gay robot partner (does that come across in the fansubs?) is a hoary old stereotype and neither the situation nor the characters managed to hook me in. I'll give it a couple more episodes before I decide to keep watching it.
> ---------------------------------

Well, it's pretty, which counts with me. >:P I don't think I really picked up on the gay part. Aren't gay robots usually more effeminate? (sp?) As for the characters...One episode usually doesn't have enough to actually get me interested in the characters. I was mostly impressed by #1 prettiness, and #2 the possibility that the plot will develop into an interesting sci-fi mystery (though we all know that pretty much every possible sci-fi plot has been exhausted in movies, series, books, or animation). Or, at least, it seems that way to me.
hamano
post #182  on February 14, 2006 - 1:50 PM PST  
> Well, it's pretty, which counts with me.

It IS nicely rendered but the character designs are a bit boring. And the whole tone of what's on screen is too busy and a bit dull at the same time somehow. Maybe it's the color palette they use or the general darkness of tone.

> I don't think I really picked up on the gay part. Aren't gay robots usually more effeminate?

There are several gay stereotypes that often show up in anime other than the usual bishies and boys. There are two main types of older gay guys, one is the "macho man" who is shaped like a body builder. The other is the taller thinner guy with the goatee or beard. The robocop in Ergo Proxy is of the latter type. The dead giveaway with these characters is the very effiminate speech (there is a pronounced difference in masculine and feminine speech in Japanese) often paired with an incongruously deep voice. Recent other examples include:

Bob, in Speed Grapher (taller thinner bearded variety)

Reeves, the battle robot turned housekeeper and maternal caregiver in Kurogane Communications, is a good example of the "macho man" stereotype gay character.

> #2 the possibility that the plot will develop into an interesting sci-fi mystery (though we all know that pretty much every possible sci-fi plot has been exhausted in movies, series, books, or animation). Or, at least, it seems that way to me.

Yeah... like I said, I'll give it a couple more episodes to try and hook me. Hopefully it'll still get me interested, but I think I can sense when the voice actors are either too confused or too uncaring to provide a convincing "character"... when everyone is just "phoning it in" it's hard for the show to hold my interest.
Battie
post #183  on February 14, 2006 - 3:20 PM PST  
> On February 14, 2006 - 1:50 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> It IS nicely rendered but the character designs are a bit boring. And the whole tone of what's on screen is too busy and a bit dull at the same time somehow. Maybe it's the color palette they use or the general darkness of tone.
>

I'm going to agree with you on the character designs. Looks like the most effort went into the designs of the monsters.

And what's up with the Ringu rip-off? Rotfl.

> There are several gay stereotypes that often show up in anime other than the usual bishies and boys. There are two main types of older gay guys, one is the "macho man" who is shaped like a body builder. The other is the taller thinner guy with the goatee or beard. The robocop in Ergo Proxy is of the latter type. The dead giveaway with these characters is the very effiminate speech (there is a pronounced difference in masculine and feminine speech in Japanese) often paired with an incongruously deep voice. Recent other examples include:
>

Ahhh...See, now I understand why I missed it, lol.

> Bob, in Speed Grapher (taller thinner bearded variety)
>
> Reeves, the battle robot turned housekeeper and maternal caregiver in Kurogane Communications, is a good example of the "macho man" stereotype gay character.
>
>
> Yeah... like I said, I'll give it a couple more episodes to try and hook me. Hopefully it'll still get me interested, but I think I can sense when the voice actors are either too confused or too uncaring to provide a convincing "character"... when everyone is just "phoning it in" it's hard for the show to hold my interest.
> ---------------------------------

LOL! Possibly they're going for the bored disaffectation of goths? *snicker*
Shaky
post #184  on February 14, 2006 - 6:26 PM PST  
I liked Rec, but that guy turned out to be just a bit sleezy.

I don't know what to think of Ergo Proxy.

I just watched the first episode of Rescue Wings, about an SDF pilot who wanted to fly jets but ended up being assigned to a rescue squad flying helicopters instead. It wasn't at all what I expected. Rather than immediately immersing us in aerial adventure, this first episode really focused more on the little details of moving to a place away from friends and family, as Uchida arrives at his new base and tries to get settled. I enjoyed the fact that the bad gifts Uchida brings his new colleagues seem more important to his future happiness than whether he can fly the aircraft. There may be something interesting happening here.

Ech. I should be hitting the sack early, seeing as how I have an interview tomorrow for a job in Japan. And yet all this anime on my hard drive keeps calling to me...
hamano
post #185  on February 15, 2006 - 12:34 AM PST  
> On February 14, 2006 - 6:26 PM PST Shaky wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I liked Rec, but that guy turned out to be just a bit sleezy.

I thought the circumstances just turned out that way, without him really meaning to be sleazy. He seems to have more moral fiber than that wimp-ass from Suzuka, anyway. But if you mean that the rest of the series might turn out to be about his preoccupation to get Aka back into the sack, then I agree it might get tiresome really quick. At least the guy doesn't seem to be the type who'd screw his own sister, like the sleazebag in Koihime...

> I don't know what to think of Ergo Proxy.

I saw a raws file bracketed with this nice wholesome "studio" lady doing both an intro and outro. She tried to look edgy and cool wearing all Matrix-black but she was as moon-faced and cute as any other J-TV announcer. She seemed all excited about how innovative and edgy Ergo Proxy was going to be, but she seemed just as confused by the content as you or me. After she slogged through the copy she seemed relieved, not exactly in anticipation of episode two either. Maybe I'm just projecting my own thoughts...

> I just watched the first episode of Rescue Wings, about an SDF pilot who wanted to fly jets but ended up being assigned to a rescue squad flying helicopters instead.

That's kinda like the Bollywood film Veer-Zaara! Have the characters started singing/dancing yet? Actually it sounds a bit like the set up that made Patlabor really good in that it was more about the members of the squad than the robots.

> Ech. I should be hitting the sack early, seeing as how I have an interview tomorrow for a job in Japan.

Good luck with that!
hamano
post #186  on February 15, 2006 - 12:49 AM PST  
> On February 15, 2006 - 12:34 AM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > Ech. I should be hitting the sack early, seeing as how I have an interview tomorrow for a job in Japan.
>
> Good luck with that!
> ---------------------------------

Er... I meant good luck with your interview, not spending the night of Valentine's Day with your hard drive!
^_^

Next year you'll have to remember to wait for White Day to give chocolates to Japanese girls. I'm sure the curious young female coworkers will be lining up to give the new American arrival something to remember them by on Feb. 14, you lucky devil!
Shaky
post #187  on February 15, 2006 - 12:35 PM PST  
> On February 15, 2006 - 12:49 AM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Next year you'll have to remember to wait for White Day to give chocolates to Japanese girls.
> ---------------------------------

Well, since I'll have Gaijin Power, I'm sure that I can give them chocolates whenever I damned well feel like it.
Shaky
post #188  on February 16, 2006 - 8:24 PM PST  
> On February 13, 2006 - 3:29 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I watched the first installment of the Hellsing OVA and I actually loved it! I was not too happy with the TV series, but this version (it's actually like a really fancy recap episode, with bits of the story from a few TV series eps crammed together) had a lot of funky forward momentum and it was FUNNY! Seras Victoria has a clearer, better defined character arc, which I also thought was a big improvement. She does a lot of comic relief but I think that's a GOOD thing, eh? Basically it's like all the good things about the TV show mixed with some of the good qualities of the recent Cutie Honey OVA.
> ---------------------------------

Did you watch the actual first episode, or the abridged "Digest for Fleaks?"

Man, I love this. I actually liked the teevee version, but this version is much better. My least favorite character in the teevee version was Father Alexander Anderson. But they fixed him in this one by getting Norio Wakamoto, the voice of Chiyo-chan's dad from Azumanga Daioh, to voice it. That guy's voice just cracks me up. His part as Mechazawa was the only thing that kept me watching Cromartie High School. The promise of a reappearance by that character alone is enough to keep me watching.

I like Integra more this time around also. She's butch, and yet somehow feminine. And she smiles more.

The one disappointment in this version that I thought the teevee version handled a little better was Seras Victoria's transformation. I always thought this should be her story. This time around they really seem to be glossing over the choice she made to live, and how she comes to grips with it. She doesn't fight her new instincts nearly as much in this version, and it makes her seem a little less human than before. It's harder to identify with this Seras than the teevee Seras, and without that dramatic element it seems like it's lost a layer of depth.

But that's okay, as long as we keep getting to hear Chiyo-chan no otou-san no "AAAAAAAmen!"
hamano
post #189  on February 16, 2006 - 10:29 PM PST  
> On February 16, 2006 - 8:24 PM PST Shaky wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Did you watch the actual first episode, or the abridged "Digest for Fleaks?"

It clocked in at 50 minutes, so I think it's the actual ep.

> Man, I love this. I actually liked the teevee version, but this version is much better. My least favorite character in the teevee version was Father Alexander Anderson. But they fixed him in this one by getting Norio Wakamoto, the voice of Chiyo-chan's dad from Azumanga Daioh

Too bad they didn't get Kouji Ishii to do Alucard's voice this time! That would have made it even better...

> The one disappointment in this version that I thought the teevee version handled a little better was Seras Victoria's transformation. I always thought this should be her story.

I disagree with that a bit, although I also think the story is primarily about Seras. Despite her being bitten she was a bit too wimpy and "human" in the TV version... her reluctance or her "struggle" to hang on to her humanity or whatever made her a bit boring to me. It was the same old same old, and I was just left wondering why the producers didn't take better advantage of her outlandish physique.

The new version dispensed with that weird sense of propriety right off and used the undead groping to effectively introduce the whole virgin -> draculina concept right off the bat.

After that I found Seras Victoria's progression quite pleasing. I really thought it was much better to do away with all the angst stuff and deal with what this transformation means to a former human who is going through it. There's an aspect to her newly undead personality that's crazy and intoxicated. She has new powers but a lot of what's happening to her is beyond her control. So this time we're not watching her trying to rationally control what she's going through (the ego vs. id) like in the TV show. We're just watching her change from the old human Seras into the new undead Seras. It's like watching someone do drugs or dying of rabies or something. I guess in a way that's more voyeuristic and cruel (watching her rather than identifying with her) but I've seen the inner-conflict/angst thing a hundred times before so this is more fun. And her Renfieldesque devotion to her "Master" is amusing and pathetic at the same time.

> It's harder to identify with this Seras than the teevee Seras, and without that dramatic element it seems like it's lost a layer of depth.

Exactly! In the TV version Seras agonized over whether it would have been better to die human rather than "live" as a vamp. This time it's just about survival. It's not "glossing over the choice she made to live" rather we're experiencing her "choice to live" every step of the way with her. She feels frenzied delight at her new super-human strength and senses, a feeling that she's indeed still "alive" and then some. And her panic as she runs from Father Anderson, thinking that Alucard is dead and unable to save her, is palpable. "I have to run, I have to run... I'm going to be killed, I'm going to be killed..." I liked that shot of her hugging Alucard's severed head, too... an echo of Salome with the head of John the Baptist, eh? Very nice touch. So I do believe that a layer of depth has been ADDED, not subtracted.
hamano
post #190  on February 16, 2006 - 10:53 PM PST  
Akagi continues to wind up the tension as they head into a very high-stakes Mah Jong match with a blind genius that the Yakuza hired. The title character is a bit unbelievable, but hey, he's a "legend"...

I'm totally besotted with REC. Such a cute show!

I've seen up to Ep. 3 of that Rescue Wings thingie... not much humor but a lot of nice human drama. It would have been too expensive to make as a live action series, but the script and "acting" (voice) are just as good, one of the beauties of the art that is anime. The telephone tag plot arc reminds me of Voices of a Distant Star.
hamano
post #191  on February 22, 2006 - 12:05 AM PST  
Rescue Wing Ep. 6&7 Anachronism?

This 2 episode story arc begins and ends with the theme song from the NHK children's show Hyokkori Hyoutan Jima. When I was a little kid in Japan this was one of my favorite shows. It's a puppet show about these characters who live on a floating gourd-shaped island.

Anyway, the song is introduced as a favorite of a fighter pilot named Inoue... Hongo, the tough rescue helicopter pilot and flight instructor who loves to make life miserable for Uchida, was Inoue's co-pilot. 12 years before the Rescue Wings story takes place, Hongo and Inoue were piloting a jet that collided with a bird and went down in the sea. Inoue died, Hongo survived but was transferred out of flying jets. Inoue had requested that the theme from "Hyokkori Hyoutan Jima" be played at his funeral. At the time of the crash, Hongo was apparently 23 years old. So that makes this crusty old geezer... 35? He seems older than that.

HHJ was very popular during its run from 1964 to 1969. It's a bit of a legendary show since there were many fans, but NHK didn't preserve their film of the show. Today, only 8 episodes of the original show remain, which had been kept in the NHK archives as "samples". This was before home video, so there are no copies of the other original episodes except in the memories of people who were children in the 1960s. The show was revived with new episodes in 1991, so if you were born in Japan in the late 80's you might also have fond childhood memories of this show.

Anyway, the question is how much older than Hongo Inoue was when he died. Hongo himself was born in 1970 apparently, so without his connection to Inoue he wouldn't have much of a personal memory of HHJ. I guess Inoue must have been about 5 years older than Hongo... he would have had to be between 5 and 10 years older to have nice childhood memories of the show and its theme song. So I guess it's possible... why am I thinking about this at 3 in the morning?

Anyway, Rescue Wings is much more serious and realistic compared to Patlabor, but it's a really good show. It's funny how Uchida and Noa, the spunky girl robot pilot from Patlabor, are both from Sake Shop families...
Shaky
post #192  on February 23, 2006 - 9:36 AM PST  
> On February 22, 2006 - 12:05 AM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Anyway, Rescue Wings is much more serious and realistic compared to Patlabor, but it's a really good show.
> ---------------------------------

Still eagerly awaiting new fansubs, which are still stuck at episode 1.

Yes, I can now watch raws and get a pretty good idea of what's going on. (I did that with the first episode of this new live action version of Saiyuuki. A chick playing Sanzo? Densha Otoko playing Pig? And Monkey's too tall!) But I still miss too much in the conversation, so I still prefer the subs. Also, I'm lazy, and the active listening for translation takes too much effort.

I figured out what really bothers me about Ergo Proxy. It's that it's inconsistent. The animation one minute looks really good. The next minute it's terrible. I think they're intentionally putting their resources into the more involved action sequences and skimping on the scenes in between. That can work in some shows as long as the minimum standards for the in between scenes aren't set too low, but I think they've missed the mark in a few places with this one. The story seems to be a bit incoherent, but I'm guessing that will be remedied as we learn more about what's going on.

I am really happy that someone decided to pick up and continue subbing Kamichu. The recently released episode on the deserted beach (was it #6 or #7?), where Yurie brings back all the old memories of the townspeople, was brilliant. It had all the magic and heart of any Miyazaki film, and I would rank that episode as among the best half hours of television ever committed to tape.

On a whim I started downloading Kashimashi. I've only watched the first episode, but I liked it. The promise of teenage lesbianism will probably bring me back for more.

I am also still enjoying Zipang. The sub group that was handling that show seems to have gotten itself organized again, so I'm looking forward to new episodes. It's a great idea, and so far it continues to go in a really interesting direction. I'm wondering how this show was received in Japan, because it deals with some issues I would expect to be uncomfortable.

Pesky job and classes are taking way too much time away from my more important anime viewing.
hamano
post #193  on February 23, 2006 - 10:35 AM PST  
> On February 23, 2006 - 9:36 AM PST Shaky wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On February 22, 2006 - 12:05 AM PST hamano wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Anyway, Rescue Wings is much more serious and realistic compared to Patlabor, but it's a really good show.
> > ---------------------------------
>
> Still eagerly awaiting new fansubs, which are still stuck at episode 1.

They do some great voice acting on this show. I'm enjoying listening to Megumi, Uchida's GF. She's a perfect example of typical feminine speech in modern Japan. In Ep. 4 she visits Uchida and they go on a "date" and try to figure things out. She uses her normal "friends" voice when talking with Uchida. Then you hear her talking on the phone with her boss, and she's more self-assured as well as respectful. Later (ep 6 or 7) there's a scene where Uchida's mother calls her to ask about her son and she answers thinking it's someone else. When she realizes it's Mrs. Uchida her voice goes up an octave which is very typical of feminine speech in Japan, where a woman's tatemae voice is much higher than her "normal" voice. Megumi (as well as Uchida) also fall in and out of their Okayama dialect depending on who they're talking to.

But you realize how well-made this show is if you watch Megumi's body language throughout episode 4. The way she stands, watching Uchida blowing off steam on video games or in the batting cage, speak volumes about her feelings for him and her state of mind, and this contrasts with later scenes where Uchida realizes she's there for him and begins to behave like a model boyfriend. It's pretty amazing how anime can express these subtleties maybe even better than live action shows, and it's certainly an entertaining way to observe Japanese culture close up.

> I am really happy that someone decided to pick up and continue subbing Kamichu. The recently released episode on the deserted beach (was it #6 or #7?), where Yurie brings back all the old memories of the townspeople, was brilliant.

Maybe I'll start watching this again... The first few episodes felt like Miyazaki-Lito so I stuck to Peto-peto San which was more directly funny and heartwarming. I thought Peto-peto San and Ichigo Mashimaro were much better shows last season.

> It had all the magic and heart of any Miyazaki film, and I would rank that episode as among the best half hours of television ever committed to tape.

Do they still actually commit anything to TAPE? You'd think TV shows would be on big hard drives nowadays...

> The promise of teenage lesbianism will probably bring me back for more.

If she's really a guy is it still Yuri?
Ayato4me
post #194  on March 9, 2006 - 3:07 PM PST  
> On February 23, 2006 - 9:36 AM PST Shaky wrote:
> ---------------------------------

> I figured out what really bothers me about Ergo Proxy. It's that it's inconsistent. The animation one minute looks really good. The next minute it's terrible. I think they're intentionally putting their resources into the more involved action sequences and skimping on the scenes in between. That can work in some shows as long as the minimum standards for the in between scenes aren't set too low, but I think they've missed the mark in a few places with this one.
> ---------------------------------

This seems like a fad in anime these days! I've noticed the same thing with the only show I'm still following this season, Noein. As the series has progressed, the overall quality of the animation seems to have declined as a whole also. Which sucks, but the story still has me totally hooked. Some scenes are just beautiful, great color and scenery. The music is well-chosen too, IMO. I could just strangle the character designer as well as the inbetweeners on this one though. It looks like every character had a different designer actually. They are all in different styles, no consistantcy. Some look cool and others look retarded. And the character's eyes are just silly. The main male lead, Karasu, has eyes are just simple pencil sketches, no details, and they rarely change expression at all. it has great fight scenes however, and I usually don't go for that kind of stuff but in this one they are just beautifully rendered. A great story is essential to a good anime, I think, but beautiful art and music can really push it over the edge from good to great.

Samurai Champloo did the weird, shifty inbetween scenes also, but they were very consistant and had very striking color palettes (I thought anyway). Combine that with the great comedy/characters, cool character designs, well chosen music, and totally on-the-mark voice acting, it worked for them and was very "artsy".
Ayato4me
post #195  on March 9, 2006 - 3:14 PM PST  
Oops, I meant to ask, what should I check out now, hamano? Noein is coming out s-o--s-l-o-w that I really want to watch something else while I wait. But the new Hellsing is only remotely tempting. What else is there that I sould see?

Oh, and for those of you who are into romance anime with a little action thrown in, Noein is really turning out to be great on the "very twisted" romance theme. I'm thinking/hoping that it's going to end as a really great romance story. It's at least headed that direction atm.
Shaky
post #196  on March 9, 2006 - 6:32 PM PST  
I have been watching Noein and like it. It has a little something for everybody. The animation is a dog's breakfast of styles and techniques, but it all seems to work together somehow.

A few nights ago I watched the first episode of Shinigami no Ballad ("Ballad of the Death God"). The show appears to be about a young (teenage) girl who is a death god (shinigami). Her function is to come around at the point of death and take the soul away. But this first episode was hardly about her at all, instead focusing on a couple of young people and a cat. It's hard to tell how these characters may fit into the continuing story, but it looks like it might have some promise.

This looks like a slower, more thoughtful type show and apparently will deal with some heavy issues concerning death. The shinigami is more like the western version of Death (except cute and not bony) than the shinigami in something like Bleach. She seems to just take souls instead of having to fight monsters or vampires like in Bleach. And she weeps for those she takes, which is kind of nice.

I also am really digging Ayakashi, which is based on old Japanese ghost stories and plays. It actually tells three different horror stories over twelve episodes, each story spanning four episodes. The first four episodes retell the story from Toukaidou Yotsuya Kaidan, a classic kabuki play written in 1826. In it, a ronin samurai is haunted by the ghost of his wife, Oiwa, when he marries a younger woman. The real kabuki play has a reputaton for being cursed; bad things tend to happen to people involved in productions of it.

The next segment to hit the fansub community will be the Legend of Tenshu, which begins with episode 5 of the series. I'm looking forward to it.
hamano
post #197  on March 9, 2006 - 8:07 PM PST  
> On March 9, 2006 - 6:32 PM PST Shaky wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> A few nights ago I watched the first episode of Shinigami no Ballad ("Ballad of the Death God"). The show appears to be about a young (teenage) girl who is a death god (shinigami).

I liked this... a bit of Risky Safety mixed with a bit of Aa Megami-sama, maybe. Very cute if a tad melancholy...

> I also am really digging Ayakashi...
> The next segment to hit the fansub community will be the Legend of Tenshu, which begins with episode 5 of the series. I'm looking forward to it.

Oh, man, this show both sucks and blows! A big letdown after Honey&Clover and ParaKiss. Anyone who ventures into the horror genre in anime is taking a big risk, I'm convinced now. Mushi-shi almost succeeds just because it's so frikkin thought-provoking and resonant and layered/textured (but Mushi-shi isn't so "horror" scary, more "concept" scary). I now believe that dance and horror are the two genres that are impossible to do well in anime, and that's why j-horror is one of the few interesting segments of Japanese live-action cinema today, and why I like Bollywood. Curiously you can't make a good horror movie in Bollywood, either. And the only good Japanese musical was Happiness of the Katakuris, which was very Bollywood.

Here are the current shows where I will eagerly download a RAW file which I will watch as soon as I have it:

Mushi-shi
REC
Yomigaeru Sora Rescue Wings
Glass Mask

Add a couple of old shows trickling out:
Windy Tales (up to Ep. 8 now!)
Yawara!
Akagi (still new, but the fansubs are only now trickling out)

And... egad...
Binchou-tan

Binchoutan really makes me gag, but I can't help watching it. She has a piece of coal tied to the top of her head, for heaven's sake! It gives me the same sort of happy buzz that Teletubbies used to when Mao-chan was a baby...

Oh, and for all you CLAMP-o-holics, the Tsubasa Movie and the xxxHolic Movie fansubs just came out.

Tsubasa Movie - What is CLAMP narratively bankrupt now? The animation was stunning, as usual, but the plot wasn't much more sophisticated or interesting than the Pokemon movies. Well, at least Mokona is still cute, although he seemed a lot smaller for some reason...

xxxHolic Movie - This was the winner in my book, although still a bit weak on the plot side. The character designs were a bit funky, really exaggerating CLAMP's tendency to make their main characters tall, thin and small-headed. You'll laugh at one shot of Yuuko, Watanuki and Doumeki walking down a hallway... their heads are so small and their arms are so long and their hands are so big they look like the missing links from that old TIME-LIFE graphic of the EVOLUTION of MAN. The character designs look more like a cross between Samurai Champloo and something from Studio 4C than CLAMP, especially the side-characters who are not from the regular xxxHolic cast. But once Watanuki and friends are trapped in what seems to be a giant multi-dimensional haunted house things start to be really fun. The surrealness of the settings and the couple of genuinely creepy/scary moments are the reward for sticking with the story, although the ending is rather lame. I liked the Hellsing OVA more than this, but I can think of worse ways to spend an hour in anime-land.

Shaky
post #198  on March 10, 2006 - 6:31 AM PST  
> On March 9, 2006 - 8:07 PM PST hamano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Oh, man, this show both sucks and blows! A big letdown after Honey&Clover and ParaKiss.
> ---------------------------------

I disagree. It's a classic Japanese ghost story based on theater. It's GOING to be a little bit corny. Remember the Kaidan movie that consisted of four individual stories? That was corny too, but it was cool in its own way. I was willing to give this a lot of leeway, since it's based on old Japanese theater.

Each individual story is written and directed by different people, so the next one may be something different. I'm still looking forward to it.
hamano
post #199  on March 10, 2006 - 10:14 AM PST  
Yeah, well, all I can say is don't get too attached to the show, Shaky... wait till you see the next ep!

> It's a classic Japanese ghost story based on theater. It's GOING to be a little bit corny.

I don't mind the corny artificiality so much. What I disliked about the Yotsuya-Kaidan installment was the hokey framing device with the spirit of the dead playwright with his speculative narration and ploddingly existential mumblings. It's like a bad Halloween special on a prime time magazine show ("Next we pay a visit to the REAL Amityville Horror House!"). By the time the "play" reached its conclusion I was like, "who cares???" I'd rather go through a haunted house exhibit at a Japanese high school cultural festival.

> I was willing to give this a lot of leeway, since it's based on old Japanese theater.

I thought that was the attitude the producers were praying for, that the audience would say, "okay, it's good because this is theatuh!" but I didn't fall for it. It's more interesing to watch and compare the "Helen Keller: Miracle Worker" arc in Glass Mask, and the Amitabh Bachchan/Rani Mukerjee not-really-Bollywood film Black. Now THAT'S theatuh! I think Ayakashi is just resting on the laurels of Yoshitaka Amano's designs and the "this is classic theatuh" effect.

> Each individual story is written and directed by different people, so the next one may be something different. I'm still looking forward to it.

Ep. 9 finally got a bit good. It's got a Vulcan-eared onmiyoji who looks like the brother of Haydee from Gankutsuou. The characters are drawn really flat, and they've overlaid a rice paper texture over the screen so everything looks like a Japanese print come-to-life. But the texture is fixed while the images move, so after the initial novelty wears off it just looks like an animated film projected on a rice-paper screen. So at first you think, "cool!" but after a while you just ignore it or think, "oh, just a gimmick"...

Also, the round-eyed flat 2D characters sometimes look like the cartoons from Monty Python. I was expecting a giant foot to drop down and squish them all half the time. Thank god they kept the same ED song, not replacing it with a Sousa's "Liberty Bell" march.

Oh, the onmiyoji is disguised as a edo/meiji-period medicine seller, hauling a big box on his back. That's the look they were going for with Ginko in Mushi-shi, and Kenshin also posed as a medicine-seller in the Trust/Betrayal OVA series.

If you got here after liking Honey&Clover and ParaKiss, instead of watching this one try Rescue Wings (the understated romance story-line between Uchida and Megumi is done very well).
Ayato4me
post #200  on March 11, 2006 - 7:39 PM PST  
Hamano, you ever thought about writing movie/anime reviews somewhere? You've totally got the lingo and additude down, lol.
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