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General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

Books into Movies
Topic by: underdog
Posted: September 25, 2003 - 1:27 PM PDT
Last Reply: January 8, 2004 - 4:40 PM PST

page  1  2  3      prev | next
author topic: Books into Movies
hamano
post #41  on November 26, 2003 - 6:31 AM PST  
> On November 26, 2003 - 12:41 AM PST dpowers wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> it's uncomfortable that blade runner feels the same every time i see it. i want it to change and it doesn't.
> ---------------------------------

Even when it really changes?
dpowers
post #42  on November 26, 2003 - 2:20 PM PST  
that might be to blame. the fiddling with it was unreal, how many times...? i started feeling as though there would be a summer holiday version, where the whole thing was set in the bahamas and harrison ford delivered his narration drunk on mai-tais, dressed in sean young's bikini.

even then it would have been bo-ring sigh
Eoliano
post #43  on November 27, 2003 - 10:41 AM PST  
From Italy comes two of my favorite film adaptations: Luchino Visconti's The Leopard from the novel by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Francesco Rosi's Christ Stopped at Eboli.

Unfortunately, Fox has yet to release a region 1 DVD of The Leopard, though a region 2 DVD has been available in Italy for two years.

Christ Stopped at Eboli, Carlo Levi's novelistic account of his exile to a hilltown in Southern Italy during the Mussolini era is an astounding film. Although the DVD is pared down to 145 minutes from its original 224 minute running time, it still makes for worthwhile viewing, particularly for the performance of Gian Maria Volonté as Levi.
underdog
post #44  on November 28, 2003 - 1:03 PM PST  
I finally went and done it. I finally created a big ol' Adapation list, a collection of some of my favorite books/stories-into-movies. It will be an expanding list as I think of more. I plopped in a few of your suggestions as well, so... thanks!

C
underdog
post #45  on November 28, 2003 - 1:04 PM PST  
> On November 28, 2003 - 1:03 PM PST underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I finally went and done it. I finally created a big ol' Adapation list, a collection of some of my favorite books/stories-into-movies. It will be an expanding list as I think of more. I plopped in a few of your suggestions as well, so... thanks!
>
> C
> ---------------------------------

Er, *adapTation* that is. I hate when I hit send before previewing. Anyway, as I said this is my own list so there will surely be some missing, but I just think of it as a companion piece to this discussion.

Brockton
post #46  on November 29, 2003 - 10:13 AM PST  
Not a short story, but...

For me, a great example is the movie version of Night of the Hunter by Davis Grubb, which is exceptionally faithful to the novel, within the "moral" limits of the time, and uniquely asserts it's own vision for the story.
Eoliano
post #47  on November 30, 2003 - 8:29 AM PST  
And what of Cornell Woolrich aka William Irish?

Rear Window

The Bride Wore Black

The Night Has a Thousand Eyes

The Leopard Man

Black Angel
MKerce
post #48  on December 1, 2003 - 11:59 AM PST  
just a few of my favorites:

Fight Club (Chuck Palahniuk)
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Hunter S. Thompson)
Requiem For A Dream (Hubert Selby Jr.)
Trainspotting (Irvine Welsh)
Naked Lunch (William S. Burroughs)
The Virgin Suicides (Jeffrey Eugenides)
High Fidelity (Nick Hornby)
larbeck
post #49  on December 2, 2003 - 12:12 PM PST  
> On December 2, 2003 - 12:06 PM PST larbeck wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On September 26, 2003 - 11:37 AM PDT JHeneghan wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > I have 'Nightfall' by Isac Asimov in my queue. Haven't seen it yet so I don't know how it works.
>
Oh, gawd, if you love Asimov, delete it now. The Good Doctor seems to have been cursed that none of his works will get the treatment on film that they deserve - and this is perhaps the worst example. They managed to squeeze all of life and magic out of the story and hire some of the worst actors know to Lifekind. And I have a real bad feeling about Will Smith in "I, Robot" - ESPECIALLY since the lead character should be female! So, any of the Good Doctor's works are certainly in need of a great adaptation, PLEASE!

Something else I would love to see (okay, it is not a story story, but...) is Vonnegut's _Cat's_Cradle_. The makers of "Slaughterhouse V" did a wonderful job on adapting the book for that film and could serve as either guide or a challenge for that project!

And any of the works of John Varley or Spider Robinson could make fine films!

Just a few off the top of my head.
artifex
post #50  on December 2, 2003 - 5:53 PM PST  
If The Running Man hasn't been mentioned, let's add it, as well.

(Personally, I think Stephen King "borrowed" the concept from a lot of Robert Sheckley short science fiction about Murders, Inc. and the Hunter/Victim game, but can't prove anything)

It's time... to start... RUNNING!
AFleming
post #51  on December 22, 2003 - 10:17 AM PST  
I've always thought Kafka's "The Trial" would make a great Terry Gilliam movie (or rather Terry Gilliam would make a great version of "The Trial"). The Orson Well's version put me to sleep and lacked any of the surreal imagery in the book.

I know of some really great books that have been made into movies ("The Unbearable Lightness of Being", "Like Water for Chocolate", "The Joy Luck Club", "This Boy's Life," etc.), but I've never seen the film versions of them because I generally hate movies made from books I really like. I saw the previews for the monster they made last year from Graham Greene's "The Quiet American" and even the preview was painful to watch. I think they completely missed the point of the book and made it into a love story, which was a VERY minor point in the book! Ugh!

BTW, I love the Harry Potter movies! I thought it was really cool to see on film what I had imagined while reading the books. But then, I've always been much more of a reader than a movie fan. As a child, I boycotted all tv and film, deeming it what people who couldn't read did. A film can't possibly convey the depth of meaning gained from reading a novel. But then I dated a film fanatic for 5 years and was finally convinced that film can be artistic in its own right through a combination of visual art, acting, and writing. So, I tend to like the artsy films. I was going to mention "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" (yeah, I'm a big T. Gilliam fan!), but someone else already did.

AFleming
post #52  on December 22, 2003 - 11:57 AM PST  
Ok, I've thought of a few.

"O Brother, Where Art Thou?" from Homer's Odessy really deserves to be on the list, IMHO.

"Crash" Book by J.G. Ballard. I thought the movie (though maybe not the BEST movie ever), was an improvement on the book. I thought the book dragged on and wasn't one of Ballard's best works.



Eoliano
post #53  on December 22, 2003 - 4:31 PM PST  
Speaking of J.G. Ballard, what of Speilberg's underrated Empire of the Sun?

And has anyone mentioned the Peter Brook adaptation of William Golding's Lord of the Flies?

underdog
post #54  on December 24, 2003 - 10:15 AM PST  
> On December 22, 2003 - 10:17 AM PST AFleming wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> I know of some really great books that have been made into movies ("The Unbearable Lightness of Being", "Like Water for Chocolate", "The Joy Luck Club", "This Boy's Life," etc.), but I've never seen the film versions of them because I generally hate movies made from books I really like. I saw the previews for the monster they made last year from Graham Greene's "The Quiet American" and even the preview was painful to watch. I think they completely missed the point of the book and made it into a love story, which was a VERY minor point in the book! Ugh!

You might want to see the The Quiet American movie, because the preview was a bit misleading; there is emphasis on the love story, yes, but many of the other elements that gave the book so much depth are in the movie. I thought the movie was excellent, fascinating. Probably still doesn't hit all the layers of the book, but more than you might think.
>

All those other movies you mention above, though certainly inferior to the books, are still quite good in their own right. What's missing, besides obviously the language, the writing, is the psychological depth, particularly from stories that are told in first person. But although The Unbearable Lightness of Being movie isn't as incredible as the book, it's still pretty beautiful, captures the sadness and...the lightness.

> BTW, I love the Harry Potter movies! I thought it was really cool to see on film what I had imagined while reading the books.


I've enjoyed these as well! But the next one, Prisoner of Azkaban looks to be the most promising of all, because they finally have an interesting director (A Cuaron) attached. (And you gotta like casting Gary Oldman as Sirius Black.)
Eoliano
post #55  on December 25, 2003 - 8:10 AM PST  
How could I forget one of the finest film adaptations ever made, and arguably Bernardo Bertolucci's masterpiece, The Conformist, from the novel by Alberto Moravia.
manfarang
post #56  on December 27, 2003 - 8:35 PM PST  
> You might want to see the The Quiet American movie, because the preview was a bit misleading; there is emphasis on the love story, yes, but many of the other elements that gave the book so much depth are in the movie. I thought the movie was excellent, fascinating. Probably still doesn't hit all the layers of the book, but more than you might think.

I have to admit that I enjoyed the film The Quiet American. While not completely faithful to the book (which is one of my favorites), it was far more true to the book than Joseph Mankiewicz' 1958 version, which twisted the story into an anti-Communist propaganda piece. I thought Michael Caine captured Fowler very well, and Brendan Fraser was terrific as the wide-eyed not-so-innocent Alden Pyle.

RWaller
post #57  on January 8, 2004 - 4:40 PM PST  
My vote for all-time best adaptation from a book goes to To Kill a Mockingbird .. but what do you expect, it's Horton Foote....

I think a special award for Best Adaptation With Little Or No Budget could go to A Boy and His Dog (with the young Don Johnson) for their brave (and necessarily creative) attempt to tackle the Harlan Ellison novella. Anyway, Harlan liked it!
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