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Public Discussions

topics
GreenCine Tech Talk
Hardware, Software, Tech.
The nuts and bolts of movie making, home theater, and DVD.
76

Video cables!!! AAAAHHHH!!!!
Topic by: dh22
Posted: October 13, 2003 - 2:33 PM PDT
Last Reply: October 20, 2003 - 10:52 PM PDT

page  1  2      prev | next
author topic: Video cables!!! AAAAHHHH!!!!
Cinenaut
post #21  on October 14, 2003 - 4:24 PM PDT  
I hear what you're saying about Sony. I bought two Walkmans (one for me and one for someone else) and they both ended up with the same bad connection for the headphone jack.

I have a Technics turntable from the 80s. Heh.
trencher
post #22  on October 15, 2003 - 12:31 AM PDT  
With a $300 budget I would suggest taking a listen to systems at Best Buy, Circuit City, etc.

If you can budget for more I would take a look at Denon, Yamaha receivers ($300-400). Speakers from Paradigm, Energy, Norh and Axiom are reasonable. A sub is a must for HT and deep, solid bass is preferable.

Audio enthusisasts generally say spend as much as you can on speakers because that technology doesn't advance as much as the electronics.

I know you probably want the whole 5.1 system now, but IMHO it's better to have a strong front 3 and then add a subwoofer and surrounds as your budget allows. Even a stereo setup is better than the speakers usually found in Televisions.
trencher
post #23  on October 15, 2003 - 12:58 AM PDT  
Anyway here's a $300 system.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?id=1056280871696&skuId=5693895&type=product&productCategoryId=cat03010

Remember with a combo system if the DVD player goes bad you have to replace that and the receiver; and vice versa. Same thing if you want to upgrade either one. Just something to think about.
msilenus
post #24  on October 15, 2003 - 7:14 AM PDT  
I got my 53' Panasonic HDTV back in May and couldnt be happier....I sing songs to it and give it a big hug every....wait a second thats too much info : |
gisellebill
post #25  on October 15, 2003 - 9:14 AM PDT  
> On October 15, 2003 - 7:14 AM PDT msilenus wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I got my 53' Panasonic HDTV back in May and couldnt be happier....I sing songs to it and give it a big hug every....wait a second thats too much info : |
> ---------------------------------

53 FEET!!?? you've got your own drive in theater! :>
dpowers
post #26  on October 15, 2003 - 10:27 AM PDT  
he meant 53°
dpowers
post #27  on October 15, 2003 - 10:28 AM PDT  
53°?
dh22
post #28  on October 15, 2003 - 11:17 AM PDT  
" would be correct.

Can we swing back to discussing cables? Anyone have any input on my original question?
Cinenaut
post #29  on October 15, 2003 - 11:21 AM PDT  
> On October 15, 2003 - 11:17 AM PDT dh22 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> " would be correct.
>
> Can we swing back to discussing cables? Anyone have any input on my original question?
> ---------------------------------

Anybody got a 53' cable?

From that one web page:
"In a nutshell, if your display device can support it, a component or RGB video connection will give you the best possible image from DVD. An S-Video connection is not far behind in quality. A composite connection, however, will result in a perfectly acceptable, but less than optimal result from your DVD player."

dh22
post #30  on October 15, 2003 - 12:06 PM PDT  
> On October 15, 2003 - 11:21 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> From that one web page:
> "In a nutshell, if your display device can support it, a component or RGB video connection will give you the best possible image from DVD. An S-Video connection is not far behind in quality. A composite connection, however, will result in a perfectly acceptable, but less than optimal result from your DVD player."
> ---------------------------------

Agreed, but the more important question is where to buy. The whole brand issue is what's really beyond me. I have never purchased anything beyond low-end.
hamano
post #31  on October 15, 2003 - 1:09 PM PDT  
I got my 50' S video cable here when I moved all my stereo and video components to the basement (my solution to babyproofing). I control everything from my family room with IR/RF signal repeaters. Everything works great, and the missus is very happy with the NO EQUIPMENT look.

Disclaimer: I'm in no way connected with this company! I'm just a customer!
trencher
post #32  on October 15, 2003 - 6:34 PM PDT  
I think for the DVD player you can go with a cheaper cable.

For your HD/cable box probably better to spend a little more, even though your cable company probably compresses the signal, giving you a lower standard HDTV signal. I have never seen it but I'm sure it's way better than standard cable.

So take a look at the all the cables at:
http://www.accessories4less.com/items.asp?CartId=8408197OE-EVEREST-FXB327&Cc=CLOSEOUT&tpc=

They carry quality cables.

Note I noticed your TV has a DVI input which would be even better than the component video signal because it keeps everything in the digital realm. Some HD boxes have these output. There are a few DVD players that do too. In fact there are some that will upscale a DVD to come closer to a HDTV picture. Of course you can't make a dog really look like a horse.

If intrested in learning about DVI just trying running a search on Google.

On the audio side of things just get a coaxial digital cable for both your DVD and Cable box. Looks just like an RCA cable. If it's provided than that cable is probably fine. There is also optical. Which since it is fiber optic (glass) you shouldn't go bending it. A $6-10 should suffice if needed.

For the budget oriented just go with affordable cables from the big electronic outlets or Radio Shack.
JJKazmer
post #33  on October 20, 2003 - 10:52 PM PDT  
> On October 15, 2003 - 11:17 AM PDT dh22 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
> Can we swing back to discussing cables? Anyone have any input on my original question?
> ---------------------------------

I'm pretty into the home theater scene, so I'll throw in my two cents worth. I've been selling home theater equipment for a few years now, so I've seen what works and what doesn't.

Cables make a huge difference when you hook your stuff up. You can get by with cheap cables for stuff that doesn't have that great of an output, i.e. a VCR, video games systems, etc. However, with an HDTV you really don't want to skimp. I figure you spent about $1800, $2000 on the TV- do you think that $10 cables will give you a $2000 picture? You don't put regular gasoline into a sports car, you put in premium. The same analogy applies for an HDTV. Now, since I work at an electronics store and get a great discount, I usually buy the best Monster cables we sell. I understand you may not want to sink that kind of cash into your setup, but I'm sure you want something that's good. How exactly you do it is up to you.

First off, make sure you have a progressive scan DVD player. Don't buy an integrated DVD/receiver unit, as it only leads to problems and a loss of functionality. For your DVD player, I would go for either Monster Video 2 or 3 component cables (RGB), or if you're on a budget, Acoustic Research component cables to hook it up with. The DVD player will give you the best picture on a consistent basis out of all of your components, so this is where to sink the money into. Monster 2 or 3 cables will be about $70-$90 depending on the distance, but make a visible difference. Make sure that you also set up your DVD player for progressive output and a 16:9 aspect ratio in the setup menu before you play any movies.

In terms of a home theater, you can pick up a decent Yamaha receiver and speaker package for about $300 at a Best Buy or comparable store. From there, you would need either a digital optical or coaxial cable to run from your DVD player into your receiver (really up to you which one to use, but for a lower end system the digital coaxial cable is probably the way to go.) You can pick up a decent digital coaxial cable anywhere from $13-$40 at Best Buy or Circuit City that will do the job. Don't buy a $10 optical cable, there is a good chance that it will just snap one day. Oh, and steer clear of Radio Shack, most of the cables they sell are junk.

Along with your home theater system, I would also pick up better speaker wire than what you get in the box- the packed in stuff is better to use as a radio antenna than wire. Good quality speaker wire isn't too expensive, plus once its run, you don't have to worry about it again. The cheap stuff in the box is more like to snap or break off of the speakers if it is moved around. One last cable you want to pick up would be a subwoofer cable to go from the receiver to the subwoofer. This will give you a better range and higher quality bass than if you just use the low end cable in the box. Likewise, you can pick up an adequate sub cable for as low as $15.

Basically, it comes down to this- don't cop out on cables when you buy good equipment; when you buy lower end stuff, you don't necessarily need to buy the best, but don't buy the worst. Oh, and just because a cable is gold plated doesn't matter that much. Better cables will have the gold plating, but they'll also have a tight connection at the end, thicker copper wire inside the cable, plus more shielding to filter out interference from other electronics around your house. If you can't see a difference between cables that you get for free in the box and cables that are over $50, you need a vision test.

Feel free to ask any other questions you have...

Joe
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