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For when your thoughts are drifting to things not so movie, or if you're feeling trivially inclined.
591

What Are You Reading? (2004 edition)
Topic by: RHorsman
Posted: March 26, 2004 - 10:12 AM PST
Last Reply: April 23, 2004 - 10:43 AM PDT

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author topic: What Are You Reading? (2004 edition)
Scooter
post #41  on April 14, 2004 - 6:44 AM PDT  
> On April 13, 2004 - 8:41 PM PDT AFleming wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I've gone link happy lately so here's a link to The Wheel of Time. I was mistaken. Book 10 is the last one published, I guess I was thinking of the prequel as book 11. Anyway.
> ---------------------------------


Wheel of Time rocks!!
I've had no time really for fiction books the last few years, unfortunately, but I always make time for the next installment of WoT.

A simplistic way of describing WoT is more believable magic, real developed characters and overall just a more rich story than that imposter Tolkien series. ;-)
oldkingcole
post #42  on April 14, 2004 - 9:18 AM PDT  
> On April 12, 2004 - 3:32 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On March 29, 2004 - 2:15 AM PST oldkingcole wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > - Hergé's "Tintin in America", "The Cigars of the Pharaoh" and "Blue Lotus" (three early Tintin adventures, originally published in Belgium in the early 1930s)
> >
> > Now I'm working my way through Michael Farr's "TINTIN The Complete Companion";
> Ahhh, Herge, Tintin. One of my favorites when I was a kid. I loved his artwork, his drawing style, in particular, the level of detail and the depiction of character -- as well as the humour, not to mention the exciting (if preposterous) storylines. I loved them. Do they seem slightly dated to you? They did to me when I picked them up again recently, as far as depiction of races and such -- but in many other respects just as fresh and exciting as they did years ago.

Underdog, the Tintin books do seem a bit dated, especially since I am reading them in chronological order of their original release, and I'm still in the earliest books of the series. These are about 70 years old! The world was a different place then, and well, that's part of what's interesting about reading them now.

The "clear line" style art is phenomenal, though most of the books were redrawn and colored by Herge in the 1940s and after, so the art reflects Herge's skills 10 years or more *after* these early stories were first conceived. That makes comparing them with their US contemporaries (for example, Milton Caniff's "Terry and the Pirates" newspaper strip) somewhat difficult. The original Herge Tintin art from the 1930s is somewhat primitive. The redrawn art is fantastic. Cannif's art falls somewhere in between.
RRappuhn
post #43  on April 14, 2004 - 10:59 AM PDT  
Discipline and Punishment
Why they Kill
Mind; an essay on Human Feeling
Amusing ourselves to Death
MIA; Mythmaking in America
Collected works of E.A. Robinson
Pattern Language

that is about it; with the exception of
The Atlantic, The New Yorker; Scientific American and various labels, warnings, and other gibberish
underdog
post #44  on April 14, 2004 - 11:14 AM PDT  
> On April 14, 2004 - 9:18 AM PDT oldkingcole wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On April 12, 2004 - 3:32 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > > On March 29, 2004 - 2:15 AM PST oldkingcole wrote:
> > > ---------------------------------
> > > - Hergé's "Tintin in America", "The Cigars of the Pharaoh" and "Blue Lotus" (three early Tintin adventures, originally published in Belgium in the early 1930s)
> > >
> > > Now I'm working my way through Michael Farr's "TINTIN The Complete Companion";
> > Ahhh, Herge, Tintin. One of my favorites when I was a kid. I loved his artwork, his drawing style, in particular, the level of detail and the depiction of character -- as well as the humour, not to mention the exciting (if preposterous) storylines. I loved them. Do they seem slightly dated to you? They did to me when I picked them up again recently, as far as depiction of races and such -- but in many other respects just as fresh and exciting as they did years ago.
>
> Underdog, the Tintin books do seem a bit dated, especially since I am reading them in chronological order of their original release, and I'm still in the earliest books of the series. These are about 70 years old! The world was a different place then, and well, that's part of what's interesting about reading them now.
>


Yes, and they do seem a bit less dated as you get to the later ones -- that is The Blue Lotus is quite dated, and some of the other earlier works, but as they go on, get a little less so. I love a few of the two-parters, the Moon one in particular.
loucyphre
post #45  on April 14, 2004 - 12:55 PM PDT  

AFleming, I have heard of the WHEEL OF TIME series, since my older brother is the fantasy fan in the family.

One of the entertainment producers I was working with a couple years back had an interview with Robert Jordan and he asked me if I had any questions for him. I told him I had never read THE WHEEL OF TIME, but if he needed questions about the CONAN books he did in the mid-eighties and early nineties, I could help. Nope, had to be WHEEL OF TIME. "I'll ask my brother," I said. Since we were sharing an apartment at the time, I asked him if he had any questions for Robert Jordan. "Yeah, when he is going to get on with it already?" I didn't know my brother had angerly tossed the sixth book in the series aside. I guess his patience ran out.

Personally, I'm not huge into fantasy fan. I tried to start the SWORD OF TRUTH series, but I put it away. One major exception is the SONG OF ICE AND FIRE by George R. R. Martin. I only read the first in the series so far, A GAME OF THRONES, but I thought it was excellent. I also love some of the classic pulp writers - Robert E. Howard, Edgar Rice Burroughs and such.


jstack
post #46  on April 15, 2004 - 6:55 AM PDT  
I am currently reading "The World According to Garp" again. One problem though ever since I saw the movie awhile back, when I read the book I have nightmare flashbacks of John Lithgow dressed as a woman... not the best looking transsexual the world has known.
AFleming
post #47  on April 15, 2004 - 8:40 AM PDT  
> On April 14, 2004 - 12:55 PM PDT loucyphre wrote:
> ---------------------------------
>
I asked him if he had any questions for Robert Jordan. "Yeah, when he is going to get on with it already?" I didn't know my brother had angerly tossed the sixth book in the series aside. I guess his patience ran out.
>
> Personally, I'm not huge into fantasy fan. I tried to start the SWORD OF TRUTH series, but I put it away. One major exception is the SONG OF ICE AND FIRE by George R. R. Martin. I only read the first in the series so far, A GAME OF THRONES, but I thought it was excellent. I also love some of the classic pulp writers - Robert E. Howard, Edgar Rice Burroughs and such.
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------

So, did Robert Jordan answer that question? LOL. I'm sure that's on everyone's mind who is a fan of the books. The last book was pretty weak actually. Well, not exactly weak, but VERY slow. It was something like 1000 pages and covered 2 weeks story time. Maybe he's created a monster and doesn't know what to do with it? Even with what ever issues the series has, it is still the best I've read by a wide margin. The character's are very well developed, the story, even though it's incredibly long, it's extremely consistant (I've read it 3 times now and haven't noticed any contradictions, and I usually notice things like that!). The world is so detailed and the plots so absurdly interwined. It's all like a great mystery. I love the main characters. Of course, in typical fantasy style, it's about a huge battle between the light and dark. But the main character, the messiah, is just nuts and cynical. Yet he's still the hero, and well.... I'm not doing it justice, but it's really so intriguing!

I was very into fantasy and sci-fi when I was a kid. Dune was my favorite novel when I was 11 and I read it something like 7 times in one year. In highscool, I read mostly philosophical texts like Walden and various religious texts. And I read the Beat literature. In the last 10 years, I've read mostly modern literature, Vonnegut, Garcia-Marquez, Kundera, Kosinski, etc. Recently, I've begun reading the classics as well. I really hated Dickens when I was a kid (had a 6th grade teacher that persuaded me to read both Oliver Twist and David Copperfield), but now I've decided he's pretty good. I think 10 is just too young to appreciate the messages in a lot of adult literature. I'm not sure why these novels are on reading lists for teenagers since it probably only serves to make them hate the classics!

My brother suggested the George R.R. Martin books to me. My husband read them and quoted some of the more particularly violent scenes to me. I guess I've put off reading them myself because that sort of gorey violence doesn't appeal to me. Even my husband said that once you get past that, they are good books though. Maybe next time I have a free slot in my book line-up, I'll slip the first one in.
sinisterguffaw
post #48  on April 15, 2004 - 12:35 PM PDT  
> On April 15, 2004 - 8:40 AM PDT AFleming wrote:
> ---------------------------------
Maybe next time I have a free slot in my book line-up, I'll slip the first one in.
> ---------------------------------

Am I the only one having a hard time holding his tongue on this one? NLee? Anyone? The innuendo is right there in front of me, but I dare not say anything!

Sorry, AFleming. I wasn't going to take this thread into the gutter, but I have a reputation to uphold!

Back on topic, my brother used to read the Wheel of Time books, but much like many others have mentioned before, he stopped after a while too. He does rave about G.R.R. Martin though. I've always been a fan of a good violent book, so I may have to try him sometime.

so I may have to try him sometime. Now who's spouting off innuendo...

Hah! beat you to the punch!
sinisterguffaw
post #49  on April 22, 2004 - 5:01 PM PDT  
I finally finished Lullaby. One year and five months later. But it only took the equivilent of maybe 24 hours to read, and that's being generous (as I am apt to do!).
RHorsman
post #50  on April 23, 2004 - 9:22 AM PDT  
For some reason, I am now reading Left Behind. I feel kind of the same way I did while I was reading Atlas Shrugged: like it's been a few days since my last shower, and I'm standing on a corner watching the police clean up a terrible road accident. I'm getting all grimy, but I can't look away...
RalphPhillips
post #51  on April 23, 2004 - 10:18 AM PDT  
I'm *trying* to read The Comics: Since 1945 but I keep getting distracted by these little green envelopes sitting on my desk.

The book is damn good, though. Just as fun to get lost in as a movie is.

manfarang
post #52  on April 23, 2004 - 10:43 AM PDT  
Last night I polished off Niccolo Ammaniti's I'm Not Scared - very entertaining. The film version just opened here in WashDC to very good reviews.
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