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General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

The Criterion Collection, Boutique Labels & Film Classics
Topic by: Eoliano
Posted: January 5, 2006 - 1:47 PM PST
Last Reply: January 29, 2007 - 3:50 PM PST

page  <<  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18      prev | next
author topic: The Criterion Collection, Boutique Labels & Film Classics
PHavel
post #221  on June 8, 2006 - 1:49 PM PDT  
> On June 8, 2006 - 1:10 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Updating the home page link as we speak, E. Thanks for the reminder!
>
> > On June 6, 2006 - 11:22 PM PDT PHavel wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Hey,
> > I just got Dazed and Confused today in the mail. It is a fantastic box with the cover art and the small poster. My girlfriend and I started watching it, but we kind of got bummed out by the beating the junior high kids stuff. Maybe we are justing having a rough day but it kind of made me blue. I will have to watch the rest of the movie later. Patrick
> > ---------------------------------
>
> Keep watching! Although parts of it are almost too realistic it's really funny. Painful, painfully funny. Keep watching! Then listen to Linklater's commentary. Classic.
> ---------------------------------
I finished watching the whole movie and I did really like it. I read some of the first essay in the booklet and I felt the despair he was talking about. It is a great expression of the waiting nature of being a teen. I liked when the intellectual guy slugged the jerk without warning. I can't wait to check out all of the extras.
P

Eoliano
post #222  on June 8, 2006 - 4:40 PM PDT  
Craig, have you delved into Mr. Arkadin yet?

Iain Blair has an interesting piece at Studio Daily about the challenge Criterion faced in putting together this extraordinary three-disc set: Reconstructing Orson Welles' Mr. Arkadin.
underdog
post #223  on June 8, 2006 - 4:59 PM PDT  
> On June 8, 2006 - 4:40 PM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Craig, have you delved into Mr. Arkadin yet?
>
> Iain Blair has an interesting piece at Studio Daily about the challenge Criterion faced in putting together this extraordinary three-disc set: Reconstructing Orson Welles' Mr. Arkadin.
> ---------------------------------

I haven't, alas. Haven't had time. :-( (I wish Criterion sent out more review copies, sigh.) Great piece by Blair, though; thanks for pointing that out. I almost feel like I've seen the set after reading all these things about it. Definitely seems like one to buy since you want to sit with it for so long and check out all the extras, read, etc...

PHavel
post #224  on June 8, 2006 - 11:09 PM PDT  
> On June 8, 2006 - 4:59 PM PDT underdog wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On June 8, 2006 - 4:40 PM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Craig, have you delved into Mr. Arkadin yet?
> >
> > Iain Blair has an interesting piece at Studio Daily about the challenge Criterion faced in putting together this extraordinary three-disc set: Reconstructing Orson Welles' Mr. Arkadin.
> > ---------------------------------
>
> I haven't, alas. Haven't had time. :-( (I wish Criterion sent out more review copies, sigh.) Great piece by Blair, though; thanks for pointing that out. I almost feel like I've seen the set after reading all these things about it. Definitely seems like one to buy since you want to sit with it for so long and check out all the extras, read, etc...
>
>
> ---------------------------------
I watched the new revised version of the movie by Criterion the other day and the short doc on the versions. The story line felt very clear and understandble which I gues was a complaint about the other versions. Welles is fantastic playing his usual proud, intelligent genius type who is full of hubris and destined for a fall. A great look at a type of human character. But I wonder how different this guy was from the guy in citizen kane, Harry Lime in the thin man and himself in F is for Fake. No doubt a great movie in my book, especially with the flashback motif.
Patrick

Eoliano
post #225  on June 10, 2006 - 12:38 PM PDT  
_
Bill Gibron reviews Criterion's new 2-disc set of Equinox at DVD Talk

"As a celebration of old school F/X melded with lessons on realizing your dreams, the Criterion Collection presentation of Equinox is above reproach. While both movies may be marred by under realized ambitions and commerce minding missteps, this is still an important primer to the varying facets of filmmaking. Easily earning a Highly Recommended rating, this two disc DVD set stands as one of the premiere preservationist's most significant statement on cinema. Not every movie can be a foreign film classic, an influential documentary or a historically important entry in the artform. No, in the case of Equinox (in either arrangement), the movie is minor at best. But with the connection to Famous Monsters of Filmland, the eventual effects stardom of the original brotherhood of first time filmmakers, and the clearly illustrated lessons in how one group's grandiose vision can be varied  and even violated  by another's need for saleable merchandise, this is an electrifying education. In one of the first cases where Criterion's digital dimensions clearly outshine the film being featured, Equinox is a must own part of any genre fan's collection. It proves that, with perseverance, anyone can achieve their cinematic goals, even if, in the end, it's merely a saleable shadow of it's former flight of fancy self."
Eoliano
post #226  on June 10, 2006 - 1:10 PM PDT  
> I watched the new revised version of the movie by Criterion the other day and the short doc on the versions.

Btw, in case anyone is interested in renting all three versions, here is my recommended viewing order:

Confidentail Report

The Corinth Version

The Comprehensive Version

Meanwhile, you might find David Cornelius' review at DVD Talk very helpful for its thorough breakdown of all three discs and their respective supplements.

Keep in mind that the Corinth Version includes a lively and extremely insightful commentary by Jonathan Rosenbaum and James Naremore.
Eoliano
post #227  on June 10, 2006 - 1:45 PM PDT  
Better late than never, here is the link to Criterion's June newsletter.

2006 newsletters:

January

February

March

April

The May 2006 newsletter is not available online.
Eoliano
post #228  on June 12, 2006 - 7:34 PM PDT  
_
That George Hickenlooper's documentary, Hearts of Darkness, is conspicuously absent from Paramount's upcoming release of Apocalypse Now - The Complete Dossier, represents something of major gaffe, deeming this so-called complete dossier incomplete. And although I have a sneaking suspicion that Hickenlooper's film might just turn up somewhere down the line, and very possibly attached to another version of this set, I think Paramount and Coppola should have included the film this time around. After all, exactly how many times do they expect Apocalypse fans to dig into their pocketbooks anyway?
Eoliano
post #229  on June 13, 2006 - 4:51 PM PDT  
Universal will be releasing the second wave of single discs from the Alfred Hitchcock Masterworks Collection next week, which will include Frenzy, Rope, Saboteur, Topaz, and Trouble With Harry. Earlier in the year Universal released Family Plot, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, Shadow of a Doubt, and Torn Curtain, so I guess we can expect The Birds, Psycho, Rear Window, Rope and Vertigo to arrive just in time for the holidays.
Eoliano
post #230  on June 13, 2006 - 4:55 PM PDT  
At Sight and Sound:

An appreciation of Japanese character actor Takeshi Shimura by filmmaker Alex Cox.

"In Donald Richie's book The Films of Akira Kurosawa Shimura speaks briefly about the director for whom he did his greatest work. "Kurosawa never tells an actor how a thing should be done. Rather, he looks at the actor's interpretation and may then make suggestions such as: 'I don't think that's quite enough' or 'How would this way be?' or 'Perhaps we'd better not do that'." A hands-off approach from a famously exigent director suggests enormous respect for the actor: respect that was reciprocated and well deserved."
Eoliano
post #231  on June 14, 2006 - 9:21 AM PDT  
Announced for September!

Seven Samurai

3-Disc Special Edition

One of the most beloved movie epics of all time, Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (Shichinin no samurai) tells the story of a sixteenth-century village whose desperate inhabits hire the eponymous warriors to protect them from invading bandits. This three-hour ride - featuring legendary actors Toshiro Mifune and Takashi Shimura - seamlessly weaves philosophy and entertainment, delicate human emotions and relentless action into a rich, evocative, and unforgettable tale of courage and hope.

Special Features

All-new restored, high-definition digital transfer
Commentary by film scholars David Desser, Joan Mellen, Donald Richie and more
Commentary by Japanese film expert Michael Jeck
50-minute making-of documentary, Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful To Create
Two-hour conversation between Kurosawa and Nagisa Oshima
New documentary, Seven Samurai: Origins and Influences
Theatrical trailers and teaser
New and improved English subtitle translation
Essays by Peter Cowie, Philip Kemp, Kenneth Turan, Sidney Lumet and more


New cover art and final details coming soon...
Eoliano
post #232  on June 14, 2006 - 9:36 AM PDT  
Brazil

Single-Disc Edition

Special Features

All-new, restored high-definition digital transfer
Audio commentary by Terry Gilliam
All-new, restored high-definition digital transfer
Optional English subtitles
Essay by Jack Mathews

3-Disc Special Edition

All-new, restored high-definition digital transfer
Audio commentary by Terry Gilliam
Optional English subtitles
30-minute on-set documentary, What Is Brazil?
The Battle of Brazil: A Video History
Storyboards, drawings, and publicity and production stills
Raw and behind-the-scenes footage
Video interviews with the production team
Theatrical trailer
94-minute Love Conquers All version
Audio essay by journalist David Morgan
An essay by Jack Mathews and more
Eoliano
post #233  on June 14, 2006 - 9:41 AM PDT  
Spirit of the Beehive

The Criterion Collection is proud to present Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive (El espiritu de la colmena), widely regarded as the greatest Spanish film of the 1970s. In a small Castilian village in 1940, directly following the country's devastating civil war, six-year-old Ana attends a traveling movie show of Frankenstein and becomes haunted by her memory of it. Produced by one of cinema's most mysterious auteurs as Franco's long regime was nearing its end, The Spirit of the Beehive is both a bewitching portrait of a child's inner life and an elusive, cloaked meditation on a nation trapped under tyranny.

Special Features

New, restored high-definition digital transfer
The Footprints of a Spirit documentary featuring Erice, Torrent and more
Director interview, Victore Erice in Madrid
Interview with film scholar Linda Ehrlich
Interview with actor Fernando Fernan Gomez
New and improved English subtitle translation
New essay by film scholar Paul Julian Smith
Eoliano
post #234  on June 14, 2006 - 9:46 AM PDT  
Jigoku

Shocking, outrageous, and poetic, Jigoku (Hell) is the most innovative creation from Nobuo Nakagawa, the father of the Japanese horror film. After a young theology student flees a hit-and-run accident, he is plagued by both his own guilt-ridden conscience and a mysterious, diabolical doppelganger. But all possible escape routes lead to Hell - literally. In the gloriously gory final third of the film, New, restored high-definition digital transferNakagawa offers up his vision of the underworld in a tour-de-force of torture and degradation. A striking departure from traditional Japanese ghost stories thanks to its truly eye-popping (and gouging) imagery, Jigoku created aftershocks that are still reverberating in cinema around the world today.

Special Features

New, restored high-definition digital transfer
Building the Inferno, a new documentary on Nakagawa and the making of the film
Galleries of posters from selected Nakagawa and Shintoho Studio films
New and improved English subtitle translation
Theatrical trailer
New essay by noted Asian cinema critic Chuck Stephens
Eoliano
post #235  on June 14, 2006 - 9:50 AM PDT  
Amarcord

2-Disc Special Edition

Special Features

All-new, restored high-definition digital transfer
Commentary by scholars Peter Brunette and Frank Burke
New 45-minute documentary, Fellini's Homecoming
Video interview with star Magali Noel
Fellini's drawings of characters in the film
Felliniana collection devoted to the film
Audio interviews with Fellini, his friends and family
New restoration demonstration
American release trailer
Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
New and improved English subtitle translation
A book featuring Fellini's memoir La Mia Rimini and essay by Sam Rohdie
underdog
post #236  on June 14, 2006 - 10:39 AM PDT  
> On June 14, 2006 - 9:36 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Brazil
>
> Single-Disc Edition
>
> Special Features
>

Wow, another Criterion edition of Brazil! It'll be good to have it back in circulation, too.
Eoliano
post #237  on June 14, 2006 - 11:29 AM PDT  
> Wow, another Criterion edition of Brazil! It'll be good to have it back in circulation, too.

In a way, I expected it because the older edition is non-anamorphic, although it did come as something of a surprise, since, unlike all of their other recent re-issues, Criterion never bothered to discontinue the old edition of Brazil beforehand. I think the single disc is a good idea, too. Meanwhile, I'm guessing that Image will be announcing the long-awaited arrival of a new edition of Tati's Playtime sometime soon. Also, new anamorphic editions of Yojimbo and Sanjuro will likely follow later in the year, though I'm surprised that Kurosawa's High and Low is lagging so far behind. I'm very excited about the Seven Samurai 3-disc set, not to mention the new edition of Amarcord, especially since I sold my copies several months ago in anticipation of these new releases.
artifex
post #238  on June 15, 2006 - 5:59 AM PDT  
> On June 14, 2006 - 9:41 AM PDT Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Spirit of the Beehive
>
> The Criterion Collection is proud to present Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive (El espiritu de la colmena), widely regarded as the greatest Spanish film of the 1970s. In a small Castilian village in 1940, directly following the country's devastating civil war, six-year-old Ana attends a traveling movie show of Frankenstein and becomes haunted by her memory of it. Produced by one of cinema's most mysterious auteurs as Franco's long regime was nearing its end, The Spirit of the Beehive is both a bewitching portrait of a child's inner life and an elusive, cloaked meditation on a nation trapped under tyranny.

Looks intriguing. I don't know anything about Erice's work, though.
Eoliano
post #239  on June 15, 2006 - 7:40 AM PDT  
> Looks intriguing. I don't know anything about Erice's work, though.

There's not much of it, only three full-length films, Spirit of the Beehive, El Sur, and Quince Tree of the Sun, all of which are highly regarded. Unfortunately, I have only seen Beehive, and that was too many years ago, so I'm unable to give a fresh appraisal, but you're certain to like it. I bet it will be a very a popular rental and strong seller.

I picked out a few articles that might give you some idea about Erice and his work. The first, from Senses of Cinema, is an overview of his films, the second, a Bfi interview from 2003, and the third, from Rouge, a piece by Erice, Writing Cinema, Thinking Cinema ...
Eoliano
post #240  on June 15, 2006 - 10:31 AM PDT  
New Cover Art


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