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General discussion about what's out for the couch.
274

Recommendation thread
Topic by: StealthJay
Posted: July 23, 2013 - 9:42 AM PDT
Last Reply: August 12, 2013 - 8:57 PM PDT

page  1  2  3      prev | next
author topic: Recommendation thread
Cinenaut
post #21  on August 2, 2013 - 11:56 AM PDT  
Here are some movies I've recently returned.

Zatoichi: On the Road (V) (1963)
Il Grido (1957)
The Tales of Hoffmann (Criterion Collection) (1951)
La Guerre Est Finie (1966)
The Son (2002)
The Wrong Man (1956)
Youth of the Beast (Criterion Collection) (1963)
The Vanishing (Criterion Collection) (1988)
Stage Fright (1950)
Goodbye, Mr. Chips (2002)
French Cancan (Criterion Collection) (1955)
The Grand Hotel (1932)
Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969)
Le Trou (Criterion Collection) (1960)
Il Generale Della Rovere (Criterion) (1959)
The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956)
Zatoichi: The New Tale of Zatoichi (III) (1963)
The 400 Blows (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray) (1959)
Un Flic (1972)
Cactus Flower (1969)
Touchez Pas au Grisbi (Criterion Collection) (1954)
Hey, Babu Riba (1986)
Zatoichi: The Tale of Zatoichi Continues (II) (1962)
Autumn Sonata (Criterion Collection) (1978)
Solas (1998)
Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (1972)
Do You Remember Dolly Bell? (1981)
Zatoichi and the Chess Expert (XII) (1965)
The Railroad Man (1956)
Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972)
La Ley De Herodes (2000)
The Taste of Tea (2004)
Zatoichi: The Festival of Fire (XXI) (1970)
Testament of Orpheus (Criterion Collection) (1960)
Surviving Desire (1991)
Top Hat (1935)
Love and Honor (2007)
Swing Time (1936)
Frenzy (1972)
Salvatore Giuliano (Criterion Collection) (1962)
Postwar Kurosawa Box: One Wonderful Sunday (1947)
kaream
post #22  on August 2, 2013 - 12:09 PM PDT  
These are a lot of great movies.

I had nightmares for weeks after watching Sluizer's "The Vanishing" (the original 1988 version).
Cinenaut
post #23  on August 2, 2013 - 12:16 PM PDT  
> On August 2, 2013 - 12:09 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> These are a lot of great movies.
>
> I had nightmares for weeks after watching Sluizer's "The Vanishing" (the original 1988 version).
> ---------------------------------

I was so over-hyped about that movie that it was totally anti-climatic for me. I don't know what I was expecting. It is a good movie, though.

Frownland, on the other hand, was nerve-wracking. ;)

Cinenaut
post #24  on August 2, 2013 - 12:35 PM PDT  
Recommendation: The Devil's Backbone.
kaream
post #25  on August 2, 2013 - 2:44 PM PDT  
> On August 2, 2013 - 12:16 PM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On August 2, 2013 - 12:09 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > These are a lot of great movies.
> >
> > I had nightmares for weeks after watching Sluizer's "The Vanishing" (the original 1988 version).
> > ---------------------------------
>
> I was so over-hyped about that movie that it was totally anti-climatic for me. I don't know what I was expecting. It is a good movie, though.
>
> Frownland, on the other hand, was nerve-wracking. ;)
>
>
> ---------------------------------

I went into "The Vanishing" totally cold - knew nothing at all about it. That makes a big difference in how you will react.

You can see why many viewers of "Frownland" walked out, hating it, while others thought it was extremely well conceived and acted. It's a tough movie.
Cinenaut
post #26  on August 3, 2013 - 11:40 AM PDT  
I did enjoy Frownland, after I adjusted to the raw twitchy performance. Thanks for the recommendation!
kaream
post #27  on August 3, 2013 - 5:09 PM PDT  
> On August 3, 2013 - 11:40 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I did enjoy Frownland, after I adjusted to the raw twitchy performance. Thanks for the recommendation!
> ---------------------------------

What I remarked at IMDb about this movie was

"Emotionally disabled people are all around us, but we barely see them; we want to put them out of sight and out of mind. And this movie shows us how cruelly we treat them."
kaream
post #28  on August 3, 2013 - 5:13 PM PDT  
Also this:

"See http://filmmakermagazine.com/4843-bleak-moments-by-david-lowery/, and also http://www.nysun.com/arts/scratching-at-a-city-of-strangers/61959/ for full discussions of the movie, cast, and script, with director Ronald Bronstein. These addressed my own questions, and gave me a better perspective on it. I'm all the more impressed with what they accomplished, and I'll need to watch the movie again sometime after my brain has calmed down from that first viewing."
kaream
post #29  on August 3, 2013 - 11:03 PM PDT  
"Animals, drums, illiterates, low castes and women are worthy of being beaten." --Quote from the "Manu Smriti" a book of Hindu religious scriptures."

This is the epigraph to Bandit Queen (1994), a movie based on the true story of Phoolan Devi.

"Low castes and women". Especially low caste women. "Worthy of being beaten". And raped. Repeatedly. Gang raped. Not to mention being given in marriage as a prepubescent.

Attitudes toward women in India have been in the news recently. Attitudes about beatings and gang rapes.

In this recommendations thread I've suggested another true story, about Jacques Mesrine; and I've suggested another difficult-to-watch movie, "Frownland". Here you get both together.

It's okay if you need to close your eyes during parts you didn't want to see. What this movie is really about is Hindu attitudes and culture. The culture of caste and clan, and the status of women in India. Now, today.

And don't say I didn't warn you. This is a very ugly movie. But see it anyway.
Cinenaut
post #30  on August 3, 2013 - 11:25 PM PDT  
It's really very much like a Mike Leigh film in the way it came about. I've wondered why nobody was making those kind of movies in the U.S.

> On August 3, 2013 - 5:13 PM PDT kaream wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Also this:
>
> "See http://filmmakermagazine.com/4843-bleak-moments-by-david-lowery/, and also http://www.nysun.com/arts/scratching-at-a-city-of-strangers/61959/ for full discussions of the movie, cast, and script, with director Ronald Bronstein. These addressed my own questions, and gave me a better perspective on it. I'm all the more impressed with what they accomplished, and I'll need to watch the movie again sometime after my brain has calmed down from that first viewing."
> ---------------------------------

kaream
post #31  on August 4, 2013 - 4:28 AM PDT  
> On August 2, 2013 - 11:56 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Here are some movies I've recently returned.
>
> [list, above]
> ---------------------------------

Antonioni: Il Grido
Becker, Jacques: Touchez Pas au Grisbi; Le Trou
Bergman: Autumn Sonata
Cocteau: Testament of Orpheus
Dardenne: The Son
Germi, Pietro: The Railroad Man
Hitchcock: Frenzy; The Wrong Man
Kurosawa: One Wonderful Sunday
Kusturica: Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
Melville: Un Flic
Renoir: French Cancan
Resnais: La Guerre est Finie
Rosi: Salvatore Giuliano
Rossellini: Il Generale Della Rovere
Suzuki, Seijun: Youth of the Beast
Truffaut: The 400 Blows

Others:
Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice -- I once invoked Alice and Bob in an online discussion, but no one understood my reference, and I got a lot of dumb comments about this movie instead. Carol is also a character in cryptography-speak; I should have found a way to include her. But poor Ted is way too far down the alphabet. The usual trio is Alice the sender, Bob the receiver, and Eve the eavesdropper.

Grand Hotel -- Garbo, Joan Crawford, both John and Lionel Barrymore, and Wallace Beery, in a beautifully photographed early talkie.

Solas Benito Zambrano (Spain) -- I've seen it, but remember almost nothing of it.

Top Hat -- Astaire, Rogers, with Irving Berlin songs; and
Swing Time -- with Kern & Fields songs - two of their best.

I'm impressed that you were actually able to get all of these good movies here unless you were on long waiting lists for some. (Speaking of waiting, I've never figured out why sometimes GC is fairly responsive, but as often as not each search takes agonizingly long. Or even just trying to preview, or post - goddam website timed out just now, and I lost half my comments. @#%*)
kaream
post #32  on August 4, 2013 - 4:30 AM PDT  
> On August 2, 2013 - 11:56 AM PDT Cinenaut wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Here are some movies I've recently returned.
>
> [list, above]
> ---------------------------------

Antonioni: Il Grido
Becker, Jacques: Touchez Pas au Grisbi; Le Trou
Bergman: Autumn Sonata
Cocteau: Testament of Orpheus
Dardenne: The Son
Germi, Pietro: The Railroad Man
Hitchcock: Frenzy; The Wrong Man
Kurosawa: One Wonderful Sunday
Kusturica: Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
Melville: Un Flic
Renoir: French Cancan
Resnais: La Guerre est Finie
Rosi: Salvatore Giuliano
Rossellini: Il Generale Della Rovere
Suzuki, Seijun: Youth of the Beast
Truffaut: The 400 Blows

Others:
Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice -- I once invoked Alice and Bob in an online discussion, but no one understood my reference, and I got a lot of dumb comments about this movie instead. Carol is also a character in cryptography-speak; I should have found a way to include her. But poor Ted is way too far down the alphabet. The usual trio is Alice the sender, Bob the receiver, and Eve the eavesdropper.

Grand Hotel -- Garbo, Joan Crawford, both John and Lionel Barrymore, and Wallace Beery, in a beautifully photographed early talkie.

Solas Benito Zambrano (Spain) -- I've seen it, but remember almost nothing of it.

Top Hat -- Astaire, Rogers, with Irving Berlin songs; and
Swing Time -- with Kern & Fields songs - two of their best.

I'm impressed that you were actually able to get all of these good movies here unless you were on long waiting lists for some. (Speaking of waiting, I've never figured out why sometimes GC is fairly responsive, but as often as not each search takes agonizingly long. Or even just trying to preview, or post - goddam website timed out just now, and I lost half my comments. @#%*)
kaream
post #33  on August 4, 2013 - 4:40 AM PDT  
STUPID WEBSITE!!! - wouldn't post, and then posted twice! Sorry about that. And pardon my French.
kaream
post #34  on August 4, 2013 - 5:10 AM PDT  
Sheesh. Trying again, if I can remember what got lost in GC's timeout:

Emir Kusturica (also a fine actor, BTW) is of course Yugoslav - Serbian, from Sarajevo - but he studied film in Prague, and his films remind me of the Czech New Wave. Including the early Milos Forman, who made such gems as The Firemen's Ball (1967). What's especially funny in this one is that these are not actors - they're the real townspeople, and real firemen, playing themselves.

Youth of the Beast, again with Jo Shishido, is one of Suzuki's craziest best. Japanese New Wave.

I don't know if anyone is interested, but I recently watched Francesco Rosi's The Moment of Truth (1965), and followed it up with the similar 2008 documentary The Matador. Both are fascinating looks at the choreography, nearly balletic, of bullfighting.

I don't dare try to preview this post - I'll just hit the post button and hope for the best.
StealthJay
post #35  on August 4, 2013 - 1:37 PM PDT  
I'm cancelling.1 shipment this billing cycle that is now over halfway through isn't worth $21
kaream
post #36  on August 4, 2013 - 11:56 PM PDT  
Adding to Cinenaut's excellent list I would suggest taking a tour of the works of the following directors. Obviously some of these will be of more interest to you than others. Some are pretty hit-and-miss in their films, so checking IMDb ratings may help winnow the field. And some directors may be difficult to understand what they're really getting at unless you immerse yourself in their output, preferably chronologically.

A through C in this post:
--Woody Allen
--Pedro Almodovar
--Robert Altman
--Lindsay Anderson
--Theo Angelopoulos (but few of his films are available in the US)
--Marco Bellocchio
--Claude Berri
--Bernardo Bertolucci
--Bertrand Blier
--Catherine Breillat - who is she and why does she make these films? - watch the extras.
--Robert Bresson - all very important.
--Clarence Brown's earliest films
--Tod Browning - check out Freaks (1932) if nothing else.
--Luis Bunuel - be sure to start with Un Chien Andalou (1929). I'm also intrigued by his sometimes denigrated Mexican period.
--Tim Burton
--Frank Capra
--Marcel Carne - everything of his, but Les Enfants du Paradis is indispensable; be sure to watch all the extras also.
--John Cassavetes (as director)
--Claude Chabrol - it's easy to overdose on him, gets to be much of a muchness. Look for best ratings.
--Charlie Chaplin, of course
--Vera Chytilova (not much available)
--Rene Clair
--Rene Clement's early films - don't miss Forbidden Games (1952).
--Henri-Georges Clouzot - get everything you can find.
--Coen Bros (but you already knew that); don't miss Blood Simple.
--Sebastian Cordero
--Costa-Gavras
--David Cronenberg
--George Cukor
--Michael Curtiz - do I even need to mention Casablanca? But lots of other great movies also.

Has everyone seen Remy Belvaux's 1992 Man Bites Dog? Wow. The DVD restores at least one horrifying scene that was cut from the theatrical release.

I left out Coppola as being too obvious (and elsewhere too Hollywood), but do see The Conversation.
kaream
post #37  on August 5, 2013 - 12:23 AM PDT  
D through G in this post:
--Jules Dassin - all up through at least Rififi (1955)
--Vittorio De Sica - there is no acceptable copy of Two Women available, and some are cut. Most but not all other films are well enough transferred.
--Jacques Demy, if he's to your taste.
--Nelson Pereira dos Santos
--Carl Theodor Dreyer - everything, but you must not miss his incredible The Passion of Joan of Arc.
--Sergei Eisenstein - everything, but watch out for some poor rip-off transfers. Be sure to include his unfinished and little-known Que Viva Mexico!.
--Rainer Werner Fassbinder, including the entire Berlin Alexanderplatz.
--Federico Fellini, of course.
--Marco Ferreri - not only the notorious La Grande Bouffe, but try others too; he takes some getting used to. The 2007 documentary Marco Ferreri: The Director Who Came from the Future is interesting.
--Louis Feuillade, I've already mentioned here; and I think that
--Robert Flaherty has already been suggested.
--Victor Fleming - I'm tossing his name in here because even if you've never heard of him, you certainly know at least a couple of his pictures, both from 1939. Some others are very worthwhile.
--John Ford, I suppose, although personally I've never quite understood what all the adulation comes from.
--Milos Forman, who I've mentioned in connection to his Czech films; but also the later American ones.
--Stephen Frears
--Samuel Fuller - always an interesting vision, but he usually strikes me as somewhat hapless.
--Abel Gance - some of these are recently becoming available.
--Terry Gilliam - pretty much all of these, including the Lost in La Mancha documentary.
--Jean-Luc Godard, in his various phases.
--Edmund Goulding, already mentioned for Grand Hotel, but worth investigating further.
--Peter Greenaway - his approach is frequently pretty far out, but fascinating; I ended up buying a box set of his otherwise unavailable films from the UK.
--D. W. Griffith - and not just Birth of a Nation.
--Tomas Gutierrez Alea - I've always specially enjoyed Guantanamera.

Try some (or all) of Alec Guinness's work with Ealing Studios - and later - as well as other Ealing films from that 1940s-'50s era.
kaream
post #38  on August 5, 2013 - 1:20 AM PDT  
H through K in this post:
--Michael Haneke - everything, except the English remake of Funny Games - you need the original 1977 in German.
--Howard Hawks
--Werner Herzog, especially the earlier ones; also the documentary Burden of Dreams by Les Blank, about the making of Fitzcarraldo.
--Hsiao-hsien Hou - Taiwan perspective
--John Huston
--Kon Ichikawa
--Shohei Imamura
--Jim Jarmusch, including Dead Man
--Jean-Pierre Jeunet
--Zhangke Jia
--Jaromil Jires
--Alejandro Jodorowsky, especially the earlier experimental ones.
--Mikhail Kalatozov - anything you can find.
--Aki Kaurismaki
--Elia Kazan
--Buster Keaton has already been mentioned; so has:
--Lodge Kerrigan
--Abbas Kiarostami
--Krzysztof Kieslowski - get everything you can find.
--Keisuke Kinoshita
--Masaki Kobayashi
--both Alexander Korda and his brother Zoltan Korda made some very interesting movies.
--Hirokazu Koreeda (or Kore-eda)
--Stanley Kubrick
--Koreyoshi Kurahara

I loved Waking Ned Devine, directed by Kirk Jones.
kaream
post #39  on August 5, 2013 - 1:22 AM PDT  
L through M in this post:
--Fritz Lang, both the German and later American films
--David Lean - many fine movies, but nothing ever surpassed his 1948 Oliver Twist, with Robert Newton, Alec Guinness, and Francis L Sullivan.
--Patrice Leconte
--Spike Lee
--Mike Leigh, already discussed.
--Richard Lester
--Yang Li
--Anatole Litvak made some interesting movies.
--Ken Loach
--Joseph Losey
--Chuan Lu
--Ernst Lubitsch, from whom Ninotchka has been my favorite.
--Sidney Lumet - check out The Pawnbroker, and his Eugene O'Neill.
--Bigas Luna - a thorough-going fascination with breasts :-)
--David Lynch
--Dusan Makavejev - I love Montenegro, but try them all.
--Karoly Makk
--Mohsen Makhmalbaf
--Terrence Malick
--Louis Malle - as with Greenaway, I had to buy a box set from the UK.
--David Mamet - very uneven in my estimation; for pure enjoyment I'd suggest The Spanish Prisoner.
--Rouben Mamoulian - some are better than usual Hollywood fare.
--Daniel Mann's Come Back, Little Sheba and The Rose Tattoo.
--Delbert Mann's Marty, and maybe a few others
--Chris Marker
--Lucrecia Martel
--Julio Medem
--Jiri Menzel
--Nikita Mikhalkov - everything, including his fascinating TV documentary Russians Deprived of Russia.
--Lewis Milestone - again, some great Hollywood movies.
--Hayao Miyazaki - I still think Spirited Away was the apex of his art.
--Kenji Mizoguchi - get everything.
--Paul Morrissey - probably Flesh is the best of his Andy Warhol series.
--F. W. Murnau

I thought Martin McDonagh's In Bruges was terrific.
kaream
post #40  on August 5, 2013 - 1:24 AM PDT  
N through SC in this post:
--Mikio Naruse
--Laurence Olivier - mostly Shakespeare.
--Max Ophuls
--Nagisa Oshima
--Francois Ozon
--Yasujiro Ozu
--Georg Wilhelm Pabst
--Sergei Parajanov
--Pier Paolo Pasolini
--Sam Peckinpah - always an interesting vision.
--Maurice Pialat
--Marcelo Pineyro
--Roman Polanski
--Michael Powell, alone, and together with Emeric Pressburger
--Vsevolod Pudovkin
--Nicholas Ray - I'm very ambivalent about his work.
--Satyajit Ray - the Apu trilogy.
--Carol Reed - everything.
--Lotte Reiniger - fantastic stop-motion with silhouette cut-outs.
--Tony Richardson - his 1960s films
--Leni Riefenstahl - including her very late documentaries, and also as a young actress before Triumph of the Will
--Arturo Ripstein
--Jacques Rivette
--Nicolas Roeg
--Eric Rohmer
--Walter Salles
--Claude Sautet
--John Schlesinger - mostly his earlier English films
--Volker Schlondorff
--Martin Scorsese

I skipped a bunch of N's here that I decided against listing: Nair, Neame, Negulesco, Nichols, Nolan, Nomura, Noyce. But there are some good movies scattered among these directors.

Wolfgang Petersen's Das Boot is very well done; Joseph Sargent's original 1974 The Taking of Pelham One Two Three is superb.
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