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GreenCine Movie Talk
Foreign
From Albania to Zaire, there's a whole world out there.
183

Convert Woozy to Bollywood!
Topic by: woozy
Posted: December 4, 2005 - 2:48 PM PST
Last Reply: January 26, 2006 - 7:47 PM PST

page  <<  11  12  13      prev | next
author topic: Convert Woozy to Bollywood!
pooja
post #221  on December 29, 2005 - 7:07 PM PST  
> On December 29, 2005 - 12:05 PM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> The point being I couldn't do my job. I was not supposed to let anyone in without having them show id.

That's really just bad BAD luck, I guess. People working in security are usually understood to be able to recognize people. They should know the faces of people who are "OK" and be able to recognize "suspicious" strangers. After a crime the police will ask if any of the security personnel spotted any unusual people around. You were better off without such a job, with those particular requirements. A job working with "things" would be better, no?

> I was asking in sense of Bollywood Indians in unity whether nobility or villager against Alien British as a movie technique. I tend to find empathy between classes to be almost more difficult to believe.

I think in hindsight one would like to believe that national unity existed. That's the way we like to remember the American Revolution, right? Landowners and farmers united against the redcoats. I think in most countries unity and allegiance are placed above class differences in moral value. Since one function of the Bollywood film is to reaffirm while re-examining national moral values like patriotism and national pride, cultural pride, heritage, things like that.

You'll see more of that explored in Mangal Pandey: The Rising if GreenCine ever gets it in. It's about what the Indians call the "first war of independence"... soldiers, working class, princes and even untouchables (or so the movie would have you believe...) united against British rule and rebelled.
pooja
post #222  on December 29, 2005 - 7:09 PM PST  
> On December 29, 2005 - 5:38 PM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> *sigh* I think Rohit deserves to be the true lover. And Anjeli in KKHH deserves to be the first love. Not fairs...

Perhaps, but that's part of the plot convention. Besides, that would make the films much too short!
woozy
post #223  on December 29, 2005 - 8:09 PM PST  
> On December 29, 2005 - 7:07 PM PST pooja wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On December 29, 2005 - 12:05 PM PST woozy wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > The point being I couldn't do my job. I was not supposed to let anyone in without having them show id.
>
> That's really just bad BAD luck, I guess. People working in security are usually understood to be able to recognize people.

I thought they were just warm bodies paid $5.25 an hour (back then, 1986, the minimum wage was something like $4.95/hr). I thought it was just to make log reports and patrol. The general idea was to check everyones idea and make sure only authorized people were allowed and not buy their sob stories. In terms of recognizing the people I wasn't supposed to knew them from Adam. This one place for some reason had pissy people who thought it was demeaning to have to show id. If you want to have any type of security system you can't have gaping holes for higher-ups to waltz in and raise hell when questioned. It wasn't that these guys didn't have ids-- they were wearing them-- they just resented being questioned.

Well, I was bad at that assignment and so-so at the others but I *hated* security.

> They should know the faces of people who are "OK" and be able to recognize "suspicious" strangers.

That's assuming they actually work there on a regular basis rather than are temped out. A "suspicious" stranger is usually "the asshole nephew of the boss is *not* allowed after hours. Don't let him bully you." (That was another assignment. He did show up with a buddy, a six-pack, a bowling ball, a soldering kit and an eight-year old girl. I gave him the "hey, I'm just doing my job spiel" and he argued back and made threatening gestures, I said fine, fudged a report, then felt bad and narcked to the boss who chewed me out for not standing up to the bastard... and *that* was the *real* reason this was a bad job for me. I'm such a timid gentle person....) or someone who doesn't show id when asked. I was told under confrontation to just play the "I'm just a stupid goon who does what my instruction sheet says Mr. CEO and I'm not supposed to know you are the CEO or the janitor". Except this one assignment had a xerox paper that said "Do not ask these six people for id or question them in anyway. Do not let anyone else in without showing their ids" and I had no superior or anyone else at all to discuss this with. Man! I hated that job!

> After a crime the police will ask if any of the security personnel spotted any unusual people around. You were better off without such a job, with those particular requirements. A job working with "things" would be better, no?
>
I was lowest level. I was just supposed to make rounds and write reports. I wasn't supposed to confront anyone or identify anyone. Just seeing that someone was in the warehouse at night was all I was expected to do.


> I think in hindsight one would like to believe that national unity existed.

It's neat the "Indian pride" in Bollywood. I don't usually go for patriatism and jingoism but then again I come from an ethnocentric bullying first world super-power.

> That's the way we like to remember the American Revolution, right? Landowners and farmers united against the redcoats.

Yeah but everyone who knows anything about American history knows that's a bunch of crap. Still it's an interesting dynamic. The local nobility have a long history with villages and a varying degree depending on the particular provence of responsibility for and/or class and power struggle with, and then some bloody stupid foreigners come in with utter arrogance either belittling the silliness of your nobility or coercing it. Wierd dynamics and transferred evils. Actually I rather like how this village and prince are portrayed. And I like the prince's "Crush them" words of encouragements before the first day.

Ah, well. Need to get back to day two of the match.

> I think in most countries unity and allegiance are placed above class differences in moral value.

Sometimes. And sometimes one class uses the other. But that's a discussion for historians and sociologists.

woozy
post #224  on December 29, 2005 - 10:12 PM PST  
Whew! Good thing I looked up the rules for Cricket before seeing the end!

I think I was a bit put off a bit be the militant fight mentality of lagaan at first but it definately grew. Whoo-hoo!

Um, so
****LAGAAN SPOILER (mild) *****
Ramdh being an "ideal" love, means Elizabeth's love for Bhuvan is ideal and unconsumated? I guess that *would* fit into the Victorian mindset.

Good cricket!
****END SPOILER****

So what, my dear, should I put next in my queue?
woozy
post #225  on December 29, 2005 - 10:20 PM PST  
Oh, never mind. KKKG is next in my list and it has my cutie Kajol and little sister pooja so there's no question.
woozy
post #226  on December 29, 2005 - 10:47 PM PST  
BTW, did you see the special feature "Scene Unseen" of the deleted scene from Lagaan. It changes quite a bit.
pooja
post #227  on December 30, 2005 - 4:48 AM PST  
> On December 29, 2005 - 10:12 PM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I think I was a bit put off a bit be the militant fight mentality of lagaan at first but it definately grew. Whoo-hoo!

Well, it's more of a "sports" mentality I think... how about that ragtag team of misfits that came together to play, eh? With hidden talents that suddenly came in very handy...

As for the extras, I saw Lagaan so long ago it was on 2 VHS tapes. I guess I'll have to rent it again sometime. After K3G you should maybe try Sholay. Sholay is one of those breakthrough landmark films that many people still claim is their favorite. It stars Amitabh Bachchan, the Sean Connery of India, who plays the father in K3G. The woman who plays his wife in K3G is his real wife Jaya Bhaduri, who played his love interest Radha (the beautiful widow) in Sholay. Jaya was Naina's Catholic mother (another beautiful widow) in Kal Ho Naa Ho, so you've just seen her recently.

There are many films that pay homage to Sholay with little comments and visual jokes that seeing it will add more dimension to future Bollywood viewing.
woozy
post #228  on December 30, 2005 - 8:41 AM PST  
>
> Well, it's more of a "sports" mentality I think... how about that ragtag team of misfits that came together to play, eh? With hidden talents that suddenly came in very handy...
>
Well, I'm no sports fan... I guess, I knew this would be a film about underdog, underequiped, villagers against occupying, overconfident, british and I knew the stakes were exorberant taxes, but I wasn't expecting it to be a "band our fingers together in a fist and beat the foreign occupiers out of our land-- our very lives are at stake". It's actually been a while since I've seen a rebellion film. I used to thrive on them in my college days.

> As for the extras, I saw Lagaan so long ago it was on 2 VHS tapes. I guess I'll have to rent it again sometime.

Well, other than a text filmography, the only special feature was a sixteen minute "scene unseen" which was filmed and edited but not in the film. I'm not sure if it was cut in the editing process or earlier. It changes the story slightly but not greatly:

**extremely mild spoilers ahead**
the scene takes place between the last practice and beginning of the game. Elizabeth gives the village an entire set of Cricket equipment. Elizabeth is seen leaving a hut speaking with Ghauri's mother (I think it was Ghauri's mother) and the mother says "Daughter, you say such sweet things" (at the end of the film, Elizabeth bids farewell to the woman and there's a slight confussion over who kneels respectfully to whom, which was a nice scene but there was never any actual interaction between the two during the final form of the film-- in this deleted scene it isn't clear just what "sweet things" Elizabeth says). Bhuvan thanks her and asks her what the village can pay her for them. Bhuvan suggests two oxen. Elizabeth says she sees him, Bhuvan, but where's the other ox. Bhuvan is at first confused and then realizes she is joking, and insists they must pay something. Elizabeth says if she must take payment she'll take the locket around his neck. He protests that it has no value. She says maybe so but he's only saying that because he doesn't want to give it to her. He takes it off and gives it to her. Ghauri sees this and gets jealous and in a rather well written rhythmic dialog she confronts him and asks what Elizabeth had to say to him. He teases her and says Elizabeth said he a viral handsome man and she was in love with him. Ghauri takes this seriously until Bhuvan says he was just teasing. At night Lakha, the village spy, comes and tells the Captain that Elizabeth gave cricket equipment and that Elizabeth is in ishq with Bhuvan. Elizabeth who had seen Lakha sneak in hears this through the glass but doesn't see Lakha's face. (The scene of her seeing Lakha come in at night and over hearing through the glass is in the final movie but it is the placed between the first and second day of the match and it is given a quick voice over.) Elizabeth flees to the village and tells Bhuvan there is a spy but she didn't see his face but heard his voice say "My being on the team has been of no use" (actually he said "of some use" but one assumes her novice hini misheard). They have each of the team repeat the phrase (each giving his own interpretation, some funny, some nervous, some emotional) and are just about to hear Lakha speak when the captain rides up with his men on horseback and orders them to search the house. He says they have stolen cricket equipment. He arrests Bhuvan and four or five of the cricket team and just before he rides off he sneers at Elizabeth and lifts Bhuvans locket around her neck with his billy-club and says to Bhuvan but directs it to Elizabeth "You didn't really think my sister was on your side, did you?" He rides of with his prisoner and Elizabeth is left there shaken as the women of the village all turn against her and Lakha says "Well, now we know who the spy was". The captain is called to the British headquarters where he is asked by the British officers about the arrest. They present a letter Elizabeth had written claiming that she had given them the cricket equipment of her free will. They admonish him that he can not hold them prisoner without a charge and if there was any theft it was done by his sister. One officer calls him a coward and accuses him as using the arrest as a tactic. Another officer asks for the date of the match and tells him to make sure that they, the officers, get good seats. The officer who called him a coward says that he'll make certain to send two umpires as they wouldn't like any other "misunderstandings". The captain storms to the cantonment and bursts into Elizabeth's bedroom (she's wearing a full lengthed victorian undergarments that covers everything but leaves her shoulders bare and her hair is loose) and slaps her about a bit. He asks her how she dares write a letter, how he was humilated before his superiors, how could she possibly go against her own brother, and she's in love with him, isn't she. Looming above her he says as punishment he's postponing her departure (yeah, *that's* a great punishment) so that she'll have to watch the match and see her beloved lose and be humilated before her eyes. The prisoners are curtly dismissed and the captain tells them the match has been moved up to within two weeks rather than 30 days. Guran, the gigantic hirsute mystic, claims that unfair but Bhuvan says they'll be ready. They are ready to play right now. The Captain dismisses them with a sneer.



> After K3G you should maybe try Sholay. Sholay is one of those breakthrough landmark films that many people still claim is their favorite. It stars Amitabh Bachchan,

Okie-dokie.
Eoliano
post #229  on December 30, 2005 - 10:03 AM PST  
Pooja, is there anything here that you can recommend?
woozy
post #230  on December 31, 2005 - 12:39 AM PST  
> On December 20, 2005 - 3:51 PM PST pooja wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I would rent Dil Se next if I were you. If nothing else the image of Malaika Arora's amazing midriff will burn itself into your Bollywood memories brain cells. They should have given her some kind of special award for that "Chaiyya Chaiyya" item number on the train... best performance by a torso or something...
> ---------------------------------

!!Yowza!! You *weren't* kidding!!!

Okay, so now that you've been 90% successfull in this threads mission (and I'm only keeping the remaining 10% as an excuse to keep you talking to me) maybe you should work on the Get woozy a date for New Years Eve Thread. (*sigh* my sister's washing her hair... reminds me of my high school prom... well, not the actual prom, of course, ... they timed that for when I was being kenneled, ... the woozy fantasy prom ... )

pooja
post #231  on January 2, 2006 - 8:40 PM PST  
> On December 30, 2005 - 10:03 AM PST Eoliano wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Pooja, is there anything here that you can recommend?
> ---------------------------------

Out of those films I've only seen Paheli and Mangal Pandey, Eo Uncle. Mangal Pandey is a quite lavishly produced Bollywood historical drama, but it's quite formulaic and pandering to Indian nationalism. It superficially resembles Lagaan... Colonial India, starring Aamir Khan, Brits are the "bad guys" but for me it fell a bit short of the mark.

Paheli has been panned in India for being a cloying "fairy tale"... just what Westerners would expect from quaint old India for the Oscars. It did poorly at the box office too, as far as I know. However, I thought it was so charming I went and bought the DVD after seeing it the first time. It's a period fable with a bit of a feminist twist... nothing that beats you over the head like Lajja or Shakti. Excellent music by music director MM. Kreem and fantastic choreography. If I were you I wouldn't pass up the chance to see it on a big screen, if only to make me feel jealous!

Whew... I'm waiting for the advils to kick in so I could go back to bed. Otherwise I know I won't be able to sleep with my achy muscles... Maybe I'll watch Paheli again.
pooja
post #232  on January 2, 2006 - 9:38 PM PST  
> On December 31, 2005 - 12:39 AM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> They should have given her some kind of special award for that "Chaiyya Chaiyya" item number on the train... best performance by a torso or something...
> > ---------------------------------
>
> !!Yowza!! You *weren't* kidding!!!

What did I tell you? She's a great dancer. She seems to specialize in doing item numbers in some real turkeys though. Fortunately there's a thriving business of packaging the song&dance numbers from Bollywood films into "music video" compilations, and I have seen her in some amazing stuff in films I'd never think of buying or renting. She and ShahRukh got together again for a thriller called KAAL to do an over-the-top item number. They don't appear in the film otherwise at all... but ShahRukh's production company made the film so the item number was stuck in just to raise the film's profile a bit. The film is about some characters played by former male-models and nubile starlets who are picked off one by one by a man-eating tiger! Fortunately I was able to score a nice music video DVD with this item number plus a few others with ShahRukh.

So you've seen K3G too? I've lost track while in my bedridden stupor... what's the scorecard?
Let's see...
Bride & Prejudice
Devdas
KKHH
Kal ho naa ho
Lagaan
K3G
Dil se
???

> Okay, so now that you've been 90% successfull in this threads mission (and I'm only keeping the remaining 10% as an excuse to keep you talking to me) maybe you should work on the Get woozy a date for New Years Eve Thread.

Oh, sorry, missed that one. Also I'm not a miracle performer myself, despite what happens at the end of my favorite Bollywood movies. I will pray to Krishna and Rama to get a date for you someday, and also for you to watch a Bollywood film with your father. If you missed watching K3G with him, maybe Hum Tum or Amar Akbar Anthony... both of those have touching "Lost Father" plot arcs in them....

So what did you think of Dil Se? Your first exposure to the current top Bollywood composer (at least by reputation abroad), AR Rahman (dpowers mentioned him earlier) and some interesting choreography by Farah Khan, including the deadly looking "Chhaiya Chhaiya" and the "Martha Graham by a Lake" bit in "Satrangi Re"... some wonderful and beautiful location shooting in Sikkim and Ladakh. You have already seen Farah Khan's choreography in K3G and KKHH and Kal Ho Naa Ho.

Gorgeous cinematography by Santosh Sivan, who also lensed Bride&Prejudice and the forthcoming Mistress of Spices (he also directed Asoka). And our favorite girl-next-door Preity Zinta handled the thankless role of the also-ran bride role very well (did you notice she was Naina from Kal Ho Naa Ho?)... one of her best performances, I think.

Ah, Manisha Koirala... the beautiful actress who is Bollywood's go-to girl for playing a victimized woman. I wish you could see her in Paisa Vasool, my favorite "girl-power chick-flick" comedy where she has a happy ending for a change. What did you think of her, woozy? It must be her soulful eyes that project "sadness" so well...
woozy
post #233  on January 2, 2006 - 9:59 PM PST  
> > !!Yowza!! You *weren't* kidding!!!
>
> What did I tell you? She's a great dancer.

The Chaiya, Chaiya, on the train is pretty exhuberant. I like the piston action of her in the center of a circle of four men in a concentric circle of eight men pumping in alternating pistons. (as well as pistol pounding on her hips).

> She seems to specialize in doing item numbers in some real turkeys though. Fortunately there's a thriving business of packaging the song&dance numbers from Bollywood films into "music video" compilations, and I have seen her in some amazing stuff in films I'd never think of buying or renting.

Neat thing about Dil Se (so far) is the music & dance numbers are not part of the story-line but actual musical breaks.

> So you've seen K3G too?

No, it's on my list but somehow this little number is next.


I've lost track while in my bedridden stupor... what's the scorecard?
> Let's see...
> Bride & Prejudice
> Devdas
> KKHH
> Kal ho naa ho
> Lagaan
> K3G (not yet)
> Dil se (only up to intermission)
> ???
>
> I will pray to Krishna and Rama to get a date for you someday,

So, if I show up on your doorstep some day this spring will there be someone you might fix me up with when you take me out to the only good Indian restaurant in Topeka?

> So what did you think of Dil Se? >

> Gorgeous cinematography by Santosh Sivan,

I think the cinematography is stunning.

>And our favorite girl-next-door Preity Zinta handled the thankless role of the also-ran bride role very well (did you notice she was Naina from Kal Ho Naa Ho?)... one of her best performances, I think.
>
I haven't gotten that far but I saw her character's name in the scene index as "Preity". So does she have a dance number where she pairs off with Malaika Arora?


>What did you think of her, woozy? It must be her soulful eyes that project "sadness" so well...

I think so. She asked for tea in the rain so sadly and earnestly.

pooja
post #234  on January 3, 2006 - 7:11 AM PST  
I guess I had a pretty decent night's sleep... still tired. Call in sick today...

> On January 2, 2006 - 9:59 PM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> I like the piston action
> eight men pumping in alternating pistons
> pistol pounding on her hips

I'm beginning to get that you have a pretty one-tracked mind, woozy. Just don't forget to wipe up afterwards, okay? You don't want Daddy to feel embarrassed for you when he comes over for KKKG and chai tea.

> Neat thing about Dil Se (so far) is the music & dance numbers are not part of the story-line but actual musical breaks.

Really they're just a series of item numbers. My theory is that these are all the fevered "fantasies" of poor girl-obsessed Amar. At least the main dancers are for the most part actors that appear as characters in the main story.

> this little number is next.

Oh, that looks like fun. Technically it's Lollywood, not Bollywood.

> > Bride & Prejudice
> > Devdas
> > KKHH
> > Kal ho naa ho
> > Lagaan
> > Dil se (only up to intermission)

> > Sholay (I'd try to get this next)
> > K3G

> So, if I show up on your doorstep some day this spring will there be someone you might fix me up with

Hey, I said I'd PRAY! Performing miracles is up to Bollywood directors and the Gods. I'm not promising you ANYTHING!!
;-)

> I haven't gotten that far but I saw her character's name in the scene index as "Preity".

Yes, sometimes they get lazy and give the character the same name as the actor (or do they cast actors that have the same name as the characters?)

> So does she have a dance number where she pairs off with Malaika Arora?

I bet that would really get your piston going, eh? ShahRukh does go shirtless in one "period" dance number... I'm not sure what that's all about but who's complaining?
woozy
post #235  on January 3, 2006 - 10:36 AM PST  

> I'm beginning to get that you have a pretty one-tracked mind, woozy. Just don't forget to wipe up afterwards, okay?

Ew, gross.
It's not that I have a one track mind. It's just that when confronted with the unrealistically bizaar (i.e. and yes in this case I do mean i.e. and not e.g. people dangerously breaking out into dance on top of moving trains) it is fun to look at the supposed symbolism (i.e. sex) and the more blatent and obvious the more fun. I mean, that was hilariously obvious, right.

> > this little number is next.
>
> Oh, that looks like fun. Technically it's Lollywood, not Bollywood.
>
Yes, well. It wasn't part of my Bollywood experiment so much as my campy obscure horror and foreign story-telling and possible (although highly unlikely in this one) gratuitous nudity experiment. I don't entirely remember what I was thinking when I put this on the list. I think it was a coincidence that it was from the general part of the world as we were discussing Bollywood so I got curious.

> > So, if I show up on your doorstep some day this spring will there be someone you might fix me up with
>
> Hey, I said I'd PRAY! Performing miracles is up to Bollywood directors and the Gods. I'm not promising you ANYTHING!!
> ;-)
>
Actually, I was only asking for a date for New Years Eve and that's long gone and forgotten now. I just wanted someone to accompany me to the bar so I could have someone to chat with wile I drink awkwardly and hopefully not feel alienated, or to be invited somewhere where I'd know someone. As for dates other time of the year you needn't worry your graceful little head.

Although, it would be nice for me to practise the social graces. And for our dinner together in Kansas, I thought you might like a little back-up. I had only your best interests at heart. However if it's just the two of us I'd be content with that.... I suppose.

> > So does she have a dance number where she pairs off with Malaika Arora?
>
> I bet that would really get your piston going, eh?

Really, I haven't played with model trains in a very long time. I was merely giving you a straight line to comment on your belief of Priety's dance skills and to contemplate the visual spectical of a duet number with her and Malaika Arora of whose dance skills you have an equally strong opinion.

>ShahRukh does go shirtless in one "period" dance number... I'm not sure what that's all about but who's complaining?

Well, as I have it on fair authority that neither Malaika nor Priety go topless in any Bollywood film nor are likely to in my lifetime, I suppose I could but ... I won't. Even I can be reasonable and give it a break once in a while. (...as long as I know in the begining not to get my hopes up...)

(By the way, It is interesting to see that they never kiss in Bollywood which is kind of fun as there is so much more left to the imagination. Although I was surprised to see the simulated kiss, or was ShahRukh attempting to strangle her, in Dil Se. Is Jism the only kiss in Bollywood, or just the first?)

pooja
post #236  on January 3, 2006 - 11:25 AM PST  
> On January 3, 2006 - 10:36 AM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Actually, I was only asking for a date for New Years Eve

Yes, well that means there's still 362 days of praying in your favor! Or is this a leap year?

> However if it's just the two of us I'd be content with that.... I suppose.

Well if you're not sure you needn't bother. There are hundreds of people who would be delighted to have afternoon tea with pooja.

> Well, as I have it on fair authority that neither Malaika nor Priety go topless in any Bollywood film nor are likely to in my lifetime, I suppose I could

There IS a new Bollywood film called TOPLESS which is being seeded on a torrent now, I think. However, I think the reviews said that the actress doesn't actually go topless. She's just confronted with the opportunity to do so in return for fame, money, etc.

> Is Jism the only kiss in Bollywood, or just the first?)

Is?
Isn't?
woozy
post #237  on January 3, 2006 - 11:49 AM PST  
>
> > However if it's just the two of us I'd be content with that.... I suppose.
>
> Well if you're not sure you needn't bother. There are hundreds of people who would be delighted to have afternoon tea with pooja.
>
Oh, I'm definately one of those. Hundreds? I suppose that isn't impossible or even unusual but ... hundreds ... I certainly would love to but I'm waiting an invitation. You *did* invite me to dinner (although I can't remember if it was to have you cook, which would be delightful and a great honor for me, or whether it was to go to the best Indian restaurant in Topeka, which would be delightful but not as delightful and a great honor for me but not as great an honor). As to whether you'd like to invite a third to accompany us, or whether we it'll be just the two of us is up to you.

If you ever come out to California to go sailing with me (by the way, what are you doing in July? Would you like to sail in Tahiti for 12 days with me? Would you like to pay money to sail in Tahiti for 12 days with me?) I'll probably invite a third, fourth, and fifth to accompany us.

> There IS a new Bollywood film called TOPLESS which is being seeded on a torrent now, I think. However, I think the reviews said that the actress doesn't actually go topless. She's just confronted with the opportunity to do so in return for fame, money, etc.
>
Well, I'll wait and see if my Bollywood expert gives it a positive review for me before I seek it out.

pooja
post #238  on January 3, 2006 - 8:58 PM PST  
> On January 3, 2006 - 11:49 AM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Would you like to pay money to sail in Tahiti for 12 days with me?

What are you now, Deuce Bigalow? I'd pay ShahRukh to go sailing with me, but I think that's where I put my limit in terms of paying for it...

Going back to Dil Se, they managed to corral some real heavy hitters in terms of playback singers. Sonu Nigam, Sukhwindher Singh, Sapna Awasthi... I want to call your attention to Sapna Awasthi in particular. She's the female voice in Chaiyya Chaiyya. She used to be a pretty normal housewife who was popular at her relatives' weddings because she sang well. She has a very distinctive voice, well suited for the more "folk" sounding or "traditional" sounding songs as opposed to your typical Bollywood pop concoction. Well, I love her voice... she's a great contrast to more traditionally Bollywood playback singers like Shreya Ghoshal with the high pitched very clear and beautiful voice.

woozy
post #239  on January 3, 2006 - 10:08 PM PST  
> On January 3, 2006 - 8:58 PM PST pooja wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> > On January 3, 2006 - 11:49 AM PST woozy wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> > Would you like to pay money to sail in Tahiti for 12 days with me?
>
> What are you now, Deuce Bigalow? I'd pay ShahRukh to go sailing with me, but I think that's where I put my limit in terms of paying for it...
>
I meant would you like to go sailing in Tahiti with me and pay your share of expenses. Sheesh. And if you don't want to pay your share of the expenses, would you like to go sailing in Tahiti for 12 days and have rob a bank to pay all your expenses? I wouldn't say no, if you wanted to pay all my expenses but I didn't see any point in asking if you would be willing to do that.

Oooh, but do you have a rich friend who'd like to not come along but pay your, mine, and everyone else's expenses? If you did that'd be really cool!

> Going back to Dil Se, ...

Poor Preeti! Will she *ever* find true love?!
pooja
post #240  on January 4, 2006 - 12:50 PM PST  
> On January 3, 2006 - 10:08 PM PST woozy wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Poor Preeti! Will she *ever* find true love?!
> ---------------------------------

You might have to wait until GreenCine gets Salaam Namaste where she and Saif Ali Khan (Rohit in KHNH) give it another go. Fun film although the music was just so-so.
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