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GreenCine Movie Talk
In The Theaters
I just saw it and boy does it...
318

28 Days Later
Topic by: ColonelKong
Posted: June 25, 2003 - 8:37 PM PDT
Last Reply: November 15, 2003 - 2:39 AM PST

author topic: 28 Days Later
ColonelKong
post #1  on June 25, 2003 - 8:37 PM PDT  
Who else here is really looking forward to seeing this film? I'll definitely be seeing it on Friday night. Of course, what I'd really love to do is see Night of the Living Dead in a theater again, but the one where I saw it at midnight closed a few years ago. :( Hey, if there's a new zombie movie out, chances are that I'll see it opening weekend, I guess the last "zombie" movie to be released by a major Hollywood studio was Ghosts of Mars, which I enjoyed, Carpenter's Vampires was also pretty much a zombie movie despite the vampire label.

I've actually never seen a Danny Boyle movie before, It'll be interesting to see how someone who isn't a established horror director takes on a "zombie" film (I'm putting it quotes, because it doesn't sound like these are exactly George Romero-type zombies), of course, The Shining was directed by someone who had never done horror before, so I don't think being a "horror" director is a necessary qualification for doing a good horror film.

I was kind of curious as to why it was shot on video, I wondered "was the budget that low?", but I read somewhere that Boyle and his DP chose digital cameras so they could set up shots quickly because they had a very narrow window of time in which to shoot the scenes where the streets of London were completely empty at 4 am. I guess it also gives you a gritty, grimy look appropriate for such a film. Hopefully, Boyle and his DP brought along a tripod so it won't look like The Blair Witch Project, which I hated.
Cinenaut
post #2  on June 27, 2003 - 4:45 PM PDT  
The official website posted the first six minutes of the movie. It looks like it could be good. I'm interested to see some reviews here.
dpowers
post #3  on June 27, 2003 - 6:36 PM PDT  
> Hopefully, Boyle and his DP brought along a tripod so it won't look like The Blair Witch Project, which I hated. <

no no, get rid of this thought. banish it from your head. tons and tons of super super movies are being shot on mid-range digital formats. a fantastic example of this is atanarjuat, which has won all kinds of awards for photography. it's very smooth to watch.

blair witch project was intentionally trying to recreate the look and feel of bad camcorder photography, somewhat to parody the film students, you know, a typical horror setup, rule #38, "poseurs are the first to die." digital video doesn't have to look like that and actually much of what was shot was shot on Hi8, not a digital format.

i've bitched and moaned about an abstract issue, that we are living in a accessible, chemical world and video is opaque and electric and might lead us away from sympathy with our organic selves and social systems, but before we get to that point, DV is useful and beautiful and can produce really good results.
Cinenaut
post #4  on June 27, 2003 - 6:47 PM PDT  
I have to second what dpowers said about atanarjuat. The digital video gave the movie a feeling of realism with none of those annoying handheld motion sickness shots.

The same goes for the Dogme 95 film Italian for Beginners, but in a much different way, of course.
ColonelKong
post #5  on June 27, 2003 - 9:23 PM PDT  
> no no, get rid of this thought. banish it from your head. tons and tons of super super movies are being shot on mid-range digital formats. a fantastic example of this is atanarjuat, which has won all kinds of awards for photography. it's very smooth to watch.

I've seen Atanarjuat and I liked it quite a bit. Spy Kids 2 was another movie shot on HD-DV that had a nice look to it

> blair witch project was intentionally trying to recreate the look and feel of bad camcorder photography, somewhat to parody the film students, you know, a typical horror setup, rule #38, "poseurs are the first to die." digital video doesn't have to look like that and actually much of what was shot was shot on Hi8, not a digital format.

Maybe I'll give The Blair Witch Project another chance one of these days, the last time I saw it was in the theater, and I have a couple of years distance from the ridiculous amount of hype when it first came out. I just remember rooting for the witch to eat the kids, which I think is a sign that horror movie is not doing it's job. I passed on seeing Blair Witch 2, obviously.

BTW, I just got back from seeing 28 Days later, which I liked a lot. Boyle and DP Anthony Dod Mantle did bring a tripod along, and actually achieved a pretty nice look for having been shot on DV. The movie borrowed a lot of zombie/apocalypse movie tropes, but I don't really mind since I think those are things that are hard to improve upon. All art is imitative to some extent, and some things are cliches for a reason.

I probabaly should've waited a couple of days to see it or have gone to a later show, because I had the misfortune of seeing it with an especially obnoxious bunch of people. Such are the pitfalls of modern moviegoing I suppose. One thing that particularly irritated me was people laughing uncomfortably during a couple of nude scenes, I really wanted to tell them to grow up a little.

I highly recommend 28 Days Later to all the horror fans here, just try to see it at a weekday matinee or a really late showing if you can.
dpowers
post #6  on June 27, 2003 - 9:54 PM PDT  
yeah i've been wanting to see that one.

i think, i have to check... just to make atanarjuat look a little better, i don't think it was HD. yeah, it was digital Beta.
msilenus
post #7  on June 28, 2003 - 1:18 PM PDT  
I got back from seeing the movie in question a few hours ago. Right before I started the third disc of Lain which arrived today. Im thinking about Lain now but 28 Days Later keeps popping into my head. I really enjoyed it. The DV was a nice touch as it gave the film kind of that Saving Private Ryan realism look. The editing was fantastic and the characters you really gave a crap about not like any of the so called "horror" drek being made in the US (hopefully Cabin Fever will change my mind about that). But all in all definitely worth a see. The only problem is a few of the scenes really were totally biopsied from the Romero films. Anyway Im off-MS
larbeck
post #8  on June 29, 2003 - 7:02 AM PDT  
> On June 25, 2003 - 8:37 PM PDT ColonelKong wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Who else here is really looking forward to seeing this film?
I AM!

>Carpenter's Vampires was also pretty much a zombie movie despite the vampire label.
Just it was and a damn good one, too. Saw it twice at the theater and own the DVD. Carpenter's commentary on the film is cool one - the man has no illusions about his potential at the Oscars. He credits James Wood especially for making "Vampires" special with his great adlibs. I agree! AND you get to hear Capenter's first all guitar band, The Texas Toad Liquors.

I will see "28 Days Later" Right Soon Now.
ColonelKong
post #9  on June 29, 2003 - 7:38 AM PDT  
> Just it was and a damn good one, too. Saw it twice at the theater and own the DVD. Carpenter's commentary on the film is cool one - the man has no illusions about his potential at the Oscars. He credits James Wood especially for making "Vampires" special with his great adlibs. I agree! AND you get to hear Capenter's first all guitar band, The Texas Toad Liquors.

Carpenter is one of my favorite movie composers, who also happens to be one of our last great American no-BS genre filmakers. Of course, one of his few films that he didn't score (The Thing) had a nice score by Ennio Morricone (another one of my favorites). Something that would probably be cool is if Carpenter played with frequent Dario Argento musical collaborators Goblin on his next film (whatever that turns out to be, I've yet to hear anything).

Speaking film soundtracks, I liked 28DL's music a lot too, I liked that it used that same Brian Eno piece that's at the end of Traffic.
underdog
post #10  on June 29, 2003 - 6:10 PM PDT  
Saw 28 Days Later this afternoon myself and also thought it was quite good, though, yes, it was certainly derivative of the "Dead" films by Romero. But, hey for what it's worth, the screenwriter admitted as such, he was "updating" it for our times -- and one of the scariest things about it is how current it feels, or how believable it seems. The "rage" virus makes SARS look like a hangnail in comparison, but it's almost believable that something like this could happen.

They also do a good job of making the characters real having you care about them. All the more disturbing and nervewracking because of that. The climatic scenes in the compound (not wanting to reveal much in the way of spoilers here) were a bit messy and certainly a rip off, or homage?, of Day of the Dead, but still pretty gripping. I guess the filmmaker's feel that if you don't give the public what they want in a zombie flick, they'll be madder than if you do get a bit derivative. There are enough twists here to make it feel okay.

I also liked the music, it's the kinda stuff I like anyway. There was only one part where the music felt too overbearing and unnecessary (in that aforementioned climactic part), but I forgave it.

And yes, the DV looked good -- I was afraid it would look too gimmicky but it worked to the film's advantage. Gave it an immediacy and (faux)reality that added to the tension. But Boyle was also, for the most part, surprisingly restrained here, too, compared to his earlier films, and in some ways this may be his most mature work as a director.

In the graphic vein of Dog Soldiers, part of a new British graphic horror movement?

C
Truetrunks
post #11  on June 30, 2003 - 9:08 AM PDT  
Does he not know how to use a Britsh L85A1 Bullpup rifle?
aloft
post #12  on July 9, 2003 - 1:38 PM PDT  
I agree, the DV look, which is often abused, worked exceptionally well in this movie. I put it this way, it has the same gritty realism that good black and white does for me. For some reason black and white feels more real than colour, perhaps because colour is usually so -- I don't know how to describe it -- it just feels fake to me. But 28 days didn't have that effect, and the subconscious feeling of reality just made it all the more spooky. Good stuff!
minordv8
post #13  on July 15, 2003 - 3:16 PM PDT  
Just to add my praise for this movie, which by the way I was able to see at an early sneak preview screening in Mountain View, I was particularly impressed with the composition of most of the establishing shots in this film. The flash of exterior scene spliced in for just a second out of context worked really well to throw off the continuity and kept me on edge. Coming out of the theater after watching the movie I wasnt quite sure that I liked the movie that much but after having a machete nightmare I decided that I definitely liked this movie.

On a side note Ive heard that theres a remake of Dawn of the Dead in the works and nobody from the first picture is involved. My hopes are buried 6under but if anyone else has heard anything different please share.
larbeck
post #14  on July 15, 2003 - 9:38 PM PDT  
> On July 15, 2003 - 3:16 PM PDT minordv8 wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> On a side note Ive heard that theres a remake of Dawn of the Dead in the works and nobody from the first picture is involved. My hopes are buried 6under but if anyone else has heard anything different please share.
>
> ---------------------------------
OOO! Was "Dawn of the Dead" the one in the shopping mall? With the line, "The only sonabitch who could shot anything with this rifle is the only bastrad who could afford it"?

Pure poetry and a great statement on the American Dream - to be trapped in a shopping mall!
larbeck
post #15  on July 15, 2003 - 9:39 PM PDT  
Correction

"The only sonabitch who could NOT shoot anything with this rifle is the only bastard who could afford it"?

I sure wish I had an edit button.
Gradalis
post #16  on July 24, 2003 - 11:39 PM PDT  
Perhaps a few of you have already noticed this but 28 DAYS LATER will have a second ending starting this weekend. Since I found it to be one of the most enjoyable films at Sundance this year, I am a little disappointed at this crass maneuver.
aloft
post #17  on September 16, 2003 - 8:42 PM PDT  
> On July 24, 2003 - 11:39 PM PDT Gradalis wrote:
> ---------------------------------
> Perhaps a few of you have already noticed this but 28 DAYS LATER will have a second ending starting this weekend. Since I found it to be one of the most enjoyable films at Sundance this year, I am a little disappointed at this crass maneuver.
> ---------------------------------

What ever happened with this? I saw the film when it first came out, and just a week or two ago, and the ending looked the same to me.
Cinenaut
post #18  on September 17, 2003 - 4:51 PM PDT  
> On September 16, 2003 - 8:42 PM PDT aloft wrote:
> > ---------------------------------
> What ever happened with this? I saw the film when it first came out, and just a week or two ago, and the ending looked the same to me.
> ---------------------------------

The new ending was supposed to be after the credits. Did you stay till the end?

MrBunBun
post #19  on November 15, 2003 - 2:39 AM PST  

>
> The new ending was supposed to be after the credits. Did you stay till the end?
>

I saw this movie on DVD (loved it) and saw all the alternate endings. What was the original ending? Please tell!

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