Articles

By Jeffrey M. Anderson

Bruce Campbell's newest film, My Name Is Bruce, is a mini-masterpiece that fans will no doubt rank near his Evil Dead trilogy and up with Bubba Ho-Tep (2003). It's a kind of post-modern, meta-film, in which Bruce plays "Bruce Campbell," a B-movie star who is called upon to help battle a real-life monster, though he believes he's just putting on a show. As with his best work, it's a combination of sheer enthusiasm for the horror genre, some clever jokes, and some sidesplitting, infectiously stupid jokes. It comes out on DVD this week, complete with the requisite Bruce Campbell commentary track. Jeffrey Anderson had the chance to sit down with Bruce when he was in San Francisco last December, to talk about the film.

Page 02/09/2009 - 11:12am

(Updated Note: Wray's documentary was not only finished but released and is now out on DVD. We're proud to say we both have the DVD and were following the film since long before it was finished. -- ed. 11/14/08 )

By David Hudson

Tara Wray had been writing stories and editing a literary journal when she decided one story would be best told as a film. Working with co-producer Michel Negroponte and a grant from the Anthony Radziwill Documentary Fund, she's now tackling her troubled relationship with her mother. David Hudson talks to her about Manhattan, Kansas.

Page 11/14/2008 - 3:00pm

By Sean Axmaker
December 16, 2005

"In the mid-1950s, director Budd Boetticher and actor Randolph Scott teamed up for a series of finely etched, elegiac westerns which count among the greatest glories of American cinema of the time." That's how the New York Film Festival announced the screening of the newly restored Seven Men From Now in 2000, finally out on DVD [Update, 11/4/08: And now the addition of five more of his films on disc! -- ed.]. Between 1988 and 1992, Sean Axmaker conducted a series of interviews with the late director. In these highlights, Boetticher talks about his work with two unique men, Scott and writer Burt Kennedy, 18-day shoots and gunslingers in love.

Page 11/03/2008 - 3:00pm

Ramin Bahrani By David D'Arcy

Ramin Bahrani has followed up his widely acclaimed Man Push Cart with Chop Shop, and we've been watching the accolades pour in at GreenCine Daily. Currently screening at New York's Film Forum through March 11, this "low-budget vérité triumph" (David Edelstein, New York) will make its way throughout the country over the next several weeks.

David D'Arcy talks with Bahrani about Abbas Kiarostami's admiration for the film, how it differs from the Dardenne brothers's work, nailing the sound of New York and about why kids could get just as much out of the movie as adults.

Chop Shop is now out on DVD.

Blog entry 07/07/2008 - 5:22am

By Michael Guillen Pedro Costa

"Let's not make this pretentious; but in some ways my films are dangerous because I work within limited financial means," Pedro Costa tells Michael Guillen. "They're dangerous in the sense that I have to risk each shot of my film. There's a French writer, Celine, who I like a lot. He wrote Journey to the End of the Night, a classic novel. He used to frequently say that the writer should 'put his skin on the table'; that was his expression. I feel the same way."

The interview touches on several of the films that have traveled the country as a retrospective that is currently screening at the Pacific Film Archive as Still Lives: The Films of Pedro Costa (through April 12). Fortunately for us, neither Michael nor the Portuguese director are in any rush to move on from one topic to the next.

Blog entry 04/02/2008 - 1:28pm

By Ladd Ehlinger Jr.

Ladd Ehlinger Jr. produced and directed the 2007 animated cult film Flatland [dvd]. The first feature film to be completely CGI animated by one person in Lightwave 3D, it received rave reviews. Phil Hall of Film Threat stated that "Flatland is a work of genius, and animation has a new force of power in Ehlinger," and Paul Di Phillipo of Scifi.com called it a "glorious mathematical mystery tour."

When Green Cine picked up Flatland for inclusion in our library, we thought it would be cool for Ladd to write a series of articles providing a filmmaker's perspective to the world of independent and classic film.

Subsequent blog articles will deal with the future of animated film; the films that most influenced him; and more.

Blog entry 03/31/2008 - 9:05am

The idea of two men directing a documentary about a summer camp for pre-teen girls might inevitably raise some red flags. But Arne Johnson and Shane King use their outsider status to craft an incredibly thoughtful and creative film about the Portland-based Rock'n'Roll Camp for Girls. The result, Girls Rock!, is a moving portrait of (to quote the luminous philosopher, Madonna) what it feels like for a girl, holding equal appeal for documentary film lovers, parents, fans of rock'n'roll and anyone who grew up as a weird kid in a town without pity.

Girls Rock! focuses on four girls attending the camp for the first time. Over the course of one week campers create bands, learn instruments, write songs and then perform for a sold out crowd. Because the concept of Rock'n'Roll camp grew out of a third wave feminist ethos, the campers are also taught basic media literacy, self-defense and how to communicate feelings of isolation or frustration that young people (especially girls) are often told to squelch. Erin Donovan spoke to Arne Johnson before he headed off to the True/False documentary film festival in Columbia, MO.

Girls Rock! opens in select cities March 7th.

Page 03/05/2008 - 3:23pm

Ramin Bahrani By David D'Arcy

Ramin Bahrani has followed up his widely acclaimed Man Push Cart with Chop Shop, and we've been watching the accolades pour in at GreenCine Daily. Currently screening at New York's Film Forum through March 11, this "low-budget vétériumph" (David Edelstein, New York) will make its way throughout the country over the next several weeks.

David D'Arcy talks with Bahrani about Abbas Kiarostami's admiration for the film, how it differs from the Dardenne brothers's work, nailing the sound of New York and about why kids could get just as much out of the movie as adults.

Blog entry 03/01/2008 - 5:22am

Tony Gilroy

By Michael Guillé

Tony Gilroy had been writing screenplays and watching directors turn them into movies for about a decade when he wrote Michael Clayton. For six years, the project simply would not get up off the ground. Then along came Jason Bourne. With the help of, among others, George Clooney, Sydney Pollack and Steven Soderbergh, he was finally able to get Michael Clayton made - and direct it himself.

The film was well-received when it premiered at the Venice Film Festival and lauded in Toronto. But when it hit theaters... well, you may have missed it. Now's your chance. It's out on DVD next week, just in time for the Oscars. It's been nominated for seven of those, including Best Picture. And Gilroy's been nominated for Best Director and Best Screenplay. Michael Guillé/a> spoke with him on the eve of its theatrical run.

Blog entry 02/11/2008 - 12:17pm

By Sean Axmaker

Adrienne Shelly

Adrienne Shelly blossomed onto the indie film scene with her 1989 screen debut in Hal Hartley's debut feature The Unbelievable Truth. In the succeeding years, the diminutive, red-headed actress proved to be very picky about her screen roles, appearing largely in idiosyncratic indie films and guest-starring in East Coast-based TV shows like Homicide and Law and Order. She had come from the stage and continued writing, directing, and performing numerous stage productions in the independent theater scene in New York, and she was making a name for herself as a film director.

(Note: Her final film as director, Waitress, is now out on DVD.)

Blog entry 11/23/2007 - 12:55am

* You can comment on articles

* Private messaging to others in the GreenCine community -- and more features coming soon!

* Keep apprised of happenings in the world of films festivals, independent, international, cult, classic, horror movies and more!

* As a free registered member, you can upgrade your account to a rental subscription -- or if you want a rental subscription right away, click here.