GREEN CINE Already a member? login
 Your cart
Help
Advanced Search
- Genres
+ Action
+ Adult
+ Adventure
+ Animation
+ Anime
+ Classics
+ Comedies
+ Comic Books
+ Crime
  Criterion Collection
+ Cult
+ Documentary
+ Drama
+ Erotica
+ Espionage
  Experimental/Avant-Garde
+ Fantasy
+ Film Noir
+ Foreign
+ Gay & Lesbian
  HD (High Def)
+ Horror
+ Independent
+ Kids
+ Martial Arts
+ Music
+ Musicals
  Pre-Code
+ Quest
+ Science Fiction
  Serials
+ Silent
+ Sports
+ Suspense/Thriller
  Sword & Sandal
+ Television
+ War
+ Westerns


What the Universe Tells Me: Unraveling the Mysteries of Mahler's Third Symphony back to product details

a mixed bag
12345678910
written by yaobong May 17, 2005 - 1:31 AM PDT
2 out of 2 members found this review helpful
The main documentary itself is rather disappointing and shallow. It's a mix of clips of musicians playing, scholars airing sound bites, and National Geographic type images with background commentaries on suffering, struggles, love, God, acceptance, blah, blah, blah - things you can say for just about any major symphonic work. Ironically it's in the extra features where I feel I learned something more about the symphony. There, the scholars and experts were given more space to explain their views and insight about the work (and Mahler in general) without getting edited away after 5 seconds.

"A Symphony Must . . . Embrace Everything"--Mahler
12345678910
written by JPielaszczyk November 1, 2004 - 1:52 PM PST
2 out of 4 members found this review helpful
"The Romantics thought of great art as a species of heroism, a breaking through or going beyond. Following them, adepts of the modern demanded of masterpieces that they be, in each case, an extreme case--terminal or prophetic, or both." Susan Sontag's words (from Under the Sign of Saturn) could be applied to Mahler's work, and, perhaps especially, to the Third, his biggest symphony, the most out of the ordinary in proportion and design, as well as the most massive of his insults to tradition--though he also craved being part of that same tradition (Joseph Steinberg, The Symphony: A Listener's Guide). Mahler (1860-1911) was the summa and the apotheosis of the Romantic tradition, and, with his researches into modern physics, psychoanalysis, and Eastern philosophy, very much a modern man. He swung for the fences, and this is his long drive ball to deep center field. He expected his audience--members of a wide socio-economic spectrum--to become transformed after hearing his music.

The "bonus disk" contains the straight-through performance of the Third. This disk contains all the excellent documentaries, with samples from the same performance, and might be enough for some.

The GC-supplied review of this CD is excellent, covering as it does the range and depth of the philosophical/artistic/historical facets surrounding this work. This is intellectual catnip with marrow.

The other--the so-called "bonus disk"--contains the straight-through performance of the Third. This disk contains all the excellent documentaries, with samples from the same performance, and might be enough for some. Others can check out the full-length version, which I've reviewed (The Whole Enchilschlaga).


Reviews for other titles in this product:
12345678910

(Average 6.80)
5 Votes
add to list New List


about greencine · donations · refer a friend · support · help · genres
contact us · press room · privacy policy · terms · sitemap · affiliates · advertise

Copyright © 2005 GreenCine LLC. All rights reserved.
© 2006 All Media Guide, LLC. Portions of content provided by All Movie Guide®, a trademark of All Media Guide, LLC.