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Garcon Stupide back to product details

Stupid or Just Vain?
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written by pscheck2 December 26, 2012 - 4:02 PM PST
Movies, like this one, do not enthrall me like it does to some reviewers. The first part of the movie seems coherent, but about halfway through, it becomes muddled and confusing! The photography is as muddled as the script: overuse of night scenes and low light levels so that many important scenes are barely preceptible! I know, this seems to be the advant guarde of French movie making (artsy-fartsy!) but just give me clarity and let me set the mood of the film--I just don't want to strain my eye-balls in trying to figurre out what is going on! The acting by Chatnagy was above par and he does exibit sexual chemistry in his acting!. Hope we see more films with him as a major character.

On the Brink
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written by talltale May 29, 2006 - 7:20 AM PDT
4 out of 4 members found this review helpful
Lionel Baier's GARCON STUPIDE offers an unusual look at the coming-of-age of a young Swiss man/boy, Loic, as he negotiates a very strange and tricky life. The movie's strengths are many, beginning with its viewpoint--almost documentary--as the director and his star Pierre Chatagny collaborate and draw from Chatagny's life to create this look at a rather severely troubled youth. I don't recall another film that reminded me so much of my own youth and decisions I made, which seem both foolish and understandable in retrospect, and I would not be surprised if many other viewers feel this, too (not so much via the specifics of Loic's life but more in the way Baier captures that point in time when a young gay man comes to terms with impending adulthood and what this can mean and bring).

Loic, attractive and alert (though untutored), is pulled by various forces--friends, sexual encounters, work--as he begins to wonder about and then discover who he is. Highly impressionable ("impressionist," as he might call it), he flirts with everything from violence and extreme sex to stalking and suicide before finding--perhaps--some pathway toward autonomy.

Ironically, the biggest problem with the film also resides in its viewpoint, which is jumbled between that documentary sense (in which the director intrudes as a character and voice) and narrative storytelling. Certain events--death, a visit to what appears to be Loic's parents (did they adopt him?), a car crash--aren't given the weight they deserve. Since this jumble is part of what gives the film its strength and originality, I guess we must chalk this up as an exercise in growth for the writer/director. I wholeheartedly recommend and would not want to have missed "Garcon Stupide" (which translates perfectly as "Stupid Boy"), and I look forward to Mr. Baier's next step.

12345678910

(Average 5.71)
35 Votes
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