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Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (1999)

Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Bonus Disc 1) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.

This special fanclub edition contains two bonus discs, featuring three live table readings of key episodes, interviews with the cast and show creators, more deleted scenes, exclusive behind the scenes footage, an unshot script and other things that are weird and hard to describe.

GREENCINE STAFF PICK: May 14, 2004: These two discs (bonus disc 1; disc 2), part of the special, ultra-geeky eight-disc "fan edition," are an amazing treasure trove of extra goodies that will at least temporarily placate any Freaks and Geeks fan, like myself, who still pine for the show. It wasn't unusual for a beloved program to be canceled before given a fair shake by clueless TV programmers (most recently, see: Wonderfalls), but in the case of the 1999-2000 show Freaks and Geeks, the lengths that fans went in an ultimately futile attempt to convince NBC to continue airing the show topped went above and beyond the call. Count me as one of those rabid fans writing emails and signing petitions, loving every minute of the show's spot-on recapturing of adolescent awkwardness. Freaks and Geeks was the brain(love)child of Judd Apatow and Paul Feig, and you can see them both in the

Some ultra-hip cameos added to the show's mystique: Likely due to the presence of one-time Mystery Science Theater collaborator Josh Weinstein as occasional writer, the show featured cameos from MST's Joel Hodgson (hilarious as a disco-lovin', lounge suit salesman) and Trace "Dr. Clayton Forrester/Crow T Robot" Beaulieu (as a befuddled science teacher), not to mention Ben Stiller (who is featured in an amusing bonus disc outtake ad libbing an extended scene as a forlorn member of the Vice President's Secret Service), Jason Schwarzman and Kevin Corrigan (in the fake ID episode), among others. And I took some comfort in the presence of SCTV's Joe Flaherty as Sam's befuddled dad (and who offers up some amusing in-character commentary on one of the main disc's audio tracks). But what really made the show was the entirely winning young cast of unknowns -- these guys were my friends from school. Again, in that roundtable Q&A, as well as in the table readings (a whopping three are included on these discs), you can see how strong the camraderie was and how well the actors (and writers) really knew these characters.

The bonus discs offer the usual assortment of deleted scenes and outtakes, the best of which is a scene where bashful Sam (John Daley) kisses his girlfriend in the stairwell while his friends look on; you can hear the director offscreen shout, "Now actually kiss!" For an easter egg treat in this section, look for a mirror to guide you to some cute commentary by geeks Daley (whose voice now sounds disconcertingly deep) and Bill Haverchuck (Martin Starr), mostly kibbutzing with each other rather than commenting on the scenes. Then there ae the audtions, which provide an interesting look at this process, and provide further proof at the talent of the young actors, even those who weren't eventually cast.

Although it would have been nice to get a bit more background or commentary on much of the raw footage and "odds and sods," they're still amusing tidbits for fans -- plus, it may be asking for too much, as there is a ton of commentary on the six main discs. And I haven't even touched on the photo galleries, the script, music videos (of sorts) featuring groovy counselor Mr. Rosso, the "alternate universe" (where cast members read other characters), and a touching montage of scenes. This and the six discs worth of F&G episodes almost make up for the show's premature cancellation. Almost. -- Craig Phillips


Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Bonus Disc 2) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.

This special fanclub edition contains two bonus discs, featuring three live table readings of key episodes, interviews with the cast and show creators, more deleted scenes, exclusive behind the scenes footage, an unshot script and other things that are weird and hard to describe.

GREENCINE STAFF PICK: May 14, 2004: These two discs (bonus disc 1; disc 2), part of the special, ultra-geeky eight-disc "fan edition," are an amazing treasure trove of extra goodies that will at least temporarily placate any Freaks and Geeks fan, like myself, who still pine for the show. It wasn't unusual for a beloved program to be canceled before given a fair shake by clueless TV programmers (most recently, see: Wonderfalls), but in the case of the 1999-2000 show Freaks and Geeks, the lengths that fans went in an ultimately futile attempt to convince NBC to continue airing the show topped went above and beyond the call. Count me as one of those rabid fans writing emails and signing petitions, loving every minute of the show's spot-on recapturing of adolescent awkwardness. Freaks and Geeks was the brain(love)child of Judd Apatow and Paul Feig, and you can see them both in the first bonus disc's likeable Q&A session from when the Museum of Radio and Television honored the show, while it was still on the air but on life support.

Some ultra-hip cameos added to the show's mystique: Likely due to the presence of one-time Mystery Science Theater collaborator Josh Weinstein as occasional writer, the show featured cameos from MST's Joel Hodgson (hilarious as a disco-lovin', lounge suit salesman) and Trace "Dr. Clayton Forrester/Crow T Robot" Beaulieu (as a befuddled science teacher), not to mention Ben Stiller (who is featured in an amusing bonus disc outtake ad libbing an extended scene as a forlorn member of the Vice President's Secret Service), Jason Schwarzman and Kevin Corrigan (in the fake ID episode), among others. And I took some comfort in the presence of SCTV's Joe Flaherty as Sam's befuddled dad (and who offers up some amusing in-character commentary on one of the main disc's audio tracks). But what really made the show was the entirely winning young cast of unknowns -- these guys were my friends from school. Again, in that roundtable Q&A, as well as in the table readings (a whopping three are included on these discs), you can see how strong the camraderie was and how well the actors (and writers) really knew these characters.

The bonus discs offer the usual assortment of deleted scenes and outtakes, the best of which is a scene where bashful Sam (John Daley) kisses his girlfriend in the stairwell while his friends look on; you can hear the director offscreen shout, "Now actually kiss!" For an easter egg treat in this section, look for a mirror to guide you to some cute commentary by geeks Daley (whose voice now sounds disconcertingly deep) and Bill Haverchuck (Martin Starr), mostly kibbutzing with each other rather than commenting on the scenes. Then there ae the audtions, which provide an interesting look at this process, and provide further proof at the talent of the young actors, even those who weren't eventually cast.

Although it would have been nice to get a bit more background or commentary on much of the raw footage and "odds and sods," they're still amusing tidbits for fans -- plus, it may be asking for too much, as there is a ton of commentary on the six main discs. And I haven't even touched on the photo galleries, the script, music videos (of sorts) featuring groovy counselor Mr. Rosso, the "alternate universe" (where cast members read other characters), and a touching montage of scenes. This and the six discs worth of F&G episodes almost make up for the show's premature cancellation. Almost. -- Craig Phillips


Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 1 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.

Please Note: This 8 disc version of Freaks and Geeks is currently Out Of Print. To purchase the 6 disc version please click here Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (6 Discs)
Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 2 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.
Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 3 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.
Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 4 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.
Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 5 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.
Freaks and Geeks: The Complete Series (Disc 6 of 6) (1999)
Rating: Not Rated
Running Time: 1080 min.
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